The Angle Orthodontist (ANGLE ORTHOD)

Publisher: Angle Orthodontists Research and Education Foundation; Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists

Journal description

The official publication of the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists published bimonthly in February, April, June, August, October and December by the EH Angle Education and Research Foundation.

Current impact factor: 1.23

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.225
2013 Impact Factor 1.277
2012 Impact Factor 1.184
2011 Impact Factor 1.207
2010 Impact Factor 1
2009 Impact Factor 0.937
2008 Impact Factor 1.166
2007 Impact Factor 0.972
2006 Impact Factor 0.777
2005 Impact Factor 0.778
2004 Impact Factor 0.782
2003 Impact Factor 0.612
2002 Impact Factor 0.656
2001 Impact Factor 0.594
2000 Impact Factor 0.704
1999 Impact Factor 0.648
1998 Impact Factor 0.442
1997 Impact Factor 0.46

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.58
Cited half-life 9.70
Immediacy index 0.29
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.49
Website Angle Orthodontist, The website
Other titles Angle orthodontist (Online), The Angle orthodontist
ISSN 1945-7103
OCLC 60639114
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate the effect of experimental prenatal and postnatal hypothyroidism (HT) on the craniofacial structure in rats. Materials and methods: Female Wistar albino rats were mated with males for fertilization. Pregnant rats were divided into three groups. Group 1 (methimazole [MMI]-induced prenatal hypothyroidism group) mother rats were given MMI water during and after pregnancy. Group 2 (MMI-induced postnatal hypothyroidism group) mother rats were given MMI water after pregnancy. After the breast-feeding period, group 1 and 2 rat pups received the same water as their lactating mothers drank. Group 3 (control group) pregnant rats and rat pups were given normal tap water. When the rat pups were 90 days of age, lateral cephalometric and posteroanterior films were taken under anesthesia. Results: Posteroanterior radiographs revealed that palatal, cranial, bizygomatic arch, and bigonial width measurements were significantly shorter in prenatal HT and postnatal HT groups compared to the control group (P < .001). Intragroup comparisons in lateral cephalometric radiographs showed that, nearly all of the comparisons were statistically significant (P < .05), with the exception of the Co-Gn, E-Pg/S-Gn measurements between the prenatal and postnatal HT groups. Conclusions: Sagittal and transverse measurements showed that untreated HT has detrimental effects on the growth of the maxilla and mandible.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To ascertain the dimensional accuracies of some commonly used ceramic self-ligation brackets and the amount of torsional play in various bracket-archwire combinations. Materials and methods: Four types of 0.022-inch slot ceramic self-ligating brackets (upper right central incisor), three types of 0.018-inch ceramic self-ligating brackets (upper right central incisor), and three types of rectangular archwires (0.016 × 0.022-inch beta-titanium [TMA] (Ormco, Orange, Calif), 0.016 × 0.022-inch stainless steel [SS] (Ortho Technology, Tampa, Fl), and 0.019 × 0.025-inch SS (Ortho Technology, Tampa, FL)) were measured using a stereomicroscope to determine slot widths and wire cross-sectional dimensions. The mean acquired dimensions of the brackets and wires were applied to an equation devised by Meling to estimate torsional play angle (γ). Results: In all bracket systems, the slot tops were significantly wider than the slot bases (P < .001), yielding a divergent slot profile. Clarity-SLs (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) showed the greatest divergence among the 0.022-inch brackets, and Clippy-Cs (Tomy, Futaba, Fukushima, Japan) among the 0.018-inch brackets. The Damon Clear (Ormco, Orange, Calif) bracket had the smallest dimensional error (0.542%), whereas the 0.022-inch Empower Clear (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, Wis) bracket had the largest (3.585%). Conclusions: The largest amount of theoretical play is observed using the Empower Clear (American Orthodontics) 0.022-inch bracket combined with the 0.016 × 0.022-inch TMA wire (Ormco, Orange, Calif), whereas the least amount occurs using the 0.018 Clippy-C (Tomy) combined with 0.016 × 0.022-inch SS wire (Ortho Technology, Tampa FL).
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To compare, through cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), the root resorption and treatment efficiency of two different mini-implant-assisted modalities in intruding the maxillary incisors. Materials and methods: Thirty-two adults who had deep bite and elongated maxillary incisors were randomly allocated to two groups: anterior mini-implant group (AMG) and posterior mini-implant group (PMG). In the AMG, approximately 40 g of force was applied per side with elastic chains from mini-implants placed between the lateral incisors and canines and in the PMG, with beta-titanium wires from mini-implants placed between the second premolars and first molars. This study was conducted on CBCT scans taken before intrusion and after 4 months of intrusion. Data were analyzed by means of a paired t-test, independent t-test, and Pearson's correlation test. Results: One patient was excluded from the AMG due to mini-implant loosening. While the incisors showed a significant reduction in length and volume, this amount was greater in the AMG, especially in the central incisors (P < .05). Together with the mean intrusion rates of 0.62 and 0.39 mm/mo in the AMG and PMG respectively, the center of resistance of the incisors showed distal movement with labial tipping; these changes were greater in the PMG (P < .001). Volumetric root resorption was correlated with the amount of intrusion (P < .05). Conclusions: Intrusion anchoring from posterior mini-implants is preferred in cases of upright incisors, as the use of such mechanics directs the roots into the spongiosa where they undergo less root resorption and more labial tipping.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate the effect of low-frequency mechanical vibration (LFMV) on orthodontically induced root resorption. Materials and methods: Forty male CD1, 12-week-old mice were used for the study. The mice were randomly divided into five groups: group 1 (baseline)-no spring and no mechanical vibration, group 2-orthodontic spring but no vibration, group 3-orthodontic spring and 5 Hz of vibration applied to the maxillary first molar, group 4-orthodontic spring and 10 Hz of vibration applied to maxillary first molar, and group 5-orthodontic spring and 20 Hz of vibration applied to maxillary first molar. In the different experimental groups, the first molar was moved mesially for 2 weeks using a nickel-titanium coil spring delivering 10 g of force. LFMVs were applied at 5 Hz, 10 Hz, and 20 Hz. Microfocus X-ray computed tomography imaging was used to analyze root resorption. Additionally, to understand the mechanism, we applied LFMV to MC3T3 cells, and gene expression analyses were done for receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Results: Orthodontic tooth movement leads to decreased root volume (increased root resorption craters). Our in vivo experiments showed a trend toward increase in root volume with different frequencies of mechanical vibration. In vitro gene expression analyses showed that with 20 Hz of mechanical vibration, there was a significant decrease in RANKL and a significant increase in OPG expression. Conclusion: There was a trend toward decreased root resorption with different LFMVs (5 Hz, 10 Hz, and 20 Hz); however, it was not more statistically significant than the orthodontic-spring-only group.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the overbite correction of fixed palatal crib (FPC) and bonded lingual spur (BLS) in the early treatment of anterior open bite (AOB) in mixed dentition (primary outcome) as well as its influence on dental and skeletal cephalometric measurements (secondary outcome). Materials and methods: The selected patients had AOB and a mean age of 8.23 years. They were divided into the following three groups by casting lots: control (n = 13), palatal crib (n = 13), and spur (n = 13). Data from the lateral teleradiography was obtained at the beginning, at 6 months, and after 1 year. The cephalometric analysis was performed by Cef-X program, recording the values of SNA, SNB, ANB, SnG oGn, 1.PP, IMPA, nasolabial angle, overbite, and overjet. Intergroup and intragroup comparisons were obtained via one-way analysis of variance. Results: The degree of AOB was similar at baseline (P > .05). At 6 months and then after 1 year all groups showed improvement in the overbite. However, only the crib and spur groups showed positive overbite. No cephalometric measurements changed significantly over the period analyzed. Conclusions: We conclude that the FPC and BLS are simple and effective for the treatment of anterior open bite, with the advantage given to the FPC.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To produce buccal translation and determine whether buccal bone forms on the cortical surfaces. Materials and methods: Eleven patients requiring maxillary first premolar extractions participated in this prospective, randomized, split-mouth study. Pre- and posttreatment records included models, photographs, and small field of view CBCT images. One randomly chosen maxillary first premolar was moved buccally with 50 g of force applied approximately at the tooth's center of resistance. The other premolar served as the control. Forces were re-activated every 3 weeks for approximately 9 weeks, after which the teeth were held in place for 3 weeks. Pre- and posttreatment records were analyzed and superimposed to evaluate changes in the dental-alveolar complex. Results: There was significant (P < .05) movement of the experimental premolar with minimal buccal tipping (2.2°). Changes in maximum bone height were bimodal, with 6 patients showing 0.42 mm and 5 patients showing 8.3 mm of vertical bone loss. Buccal bone thickness 3 mm apical to the CEJ decreased 0.63 mm. Direct measurements and CBCT superimpositions showed that buccal bone over the roots grew 0.46 mm and 0.51 mm, respectively. Conclusions: It is possible to produce buccal bodily tooth movement with only limited amounts of tipping. Such movements are capable of producing buccal bone apposition, but there are potential limitations.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the effects of functional appliance treatment on the oropharyngeal airway volume, airway dimensions, and anteroposterior hyoid bone position of growing Class II patients. Materials and methods: Twenty Class II white patients (mean age, 11.7 ± 1.75 years) treated with the MARA followed by fixed appliances were matched to an untreated control sample by cervical vertebrae maturation stage at pretreatment (T1) and posttreatment (T2) time points. Cone beam computed tomography scans were taken at T1 and T2. Dolphin3D imaging software was used to determine oropharyngeal airway volume, dimensions, and anteroposterior hyoid bone position. Results: Multivariate ANOVA was used to evaluate changes between T1 and T2. Oropharyngeal airway volume, airway dimensions, and A-P position of the hyoid bone increased significantly with functional appliance treatment. SNA and ANB decreased significantly in the experimental group (P ≤ .05). Changes in SNB and Sn-GoGn failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Functional appliance therapy increases oropharyngeal airway volume, airway dimensions, and anteroposterior hyoid bone position in growing patients.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the morphologic features and the relative position of the incisive canal with regard to the maxillary incisor roots using computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: Morphologic evaluation of the incisive canal and its proximity to the maxillary central incisors were measured using CT images of 38 adults with skeletal and dental class I normal occlusion. Linear measurements were performed on the axial cross-sectional images corresponding to three vertical levels, the palatal opening of the incisive canal (L1), midlevel between the opening level and the root apex of the maxillary central incisors (L2), and the root apex of the maxillary central incisors (L3). Results: The percentage of subjects with an incisive canal width greater than the interroot distance of the central incisors was 86.8% and 63.2% at levels L1 and L2, respectively. The anteroposterior distance between the maxillary incisor roots and the boarder of the incisive canal was approximately 5-6 mm at levels L1 and L2. Conclusion: The anteroposterior distance between the maxillary central incisor roots and the incisive canal was approximately 5-6 mm. More than 60% of the subjects had an incisive canal width greater than the interroot distance. Evaluation of the proximity of the incisive canal to the maxillary incisors, along with its dimensional characteristics, may be helpful when a considerable amount of maxillary retraction is planned.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on orthodontically induced tooth root resorption caused by torque in human subjects. Materials and methods: Ten healthy patients (12-35 years of age) who required extraction of all first premolars as a part of their routine orthodontic treatment were recruited. A 15° twist was applied in the arch wire using 0.019 × 0.025-inch TMA in a 0.022-inch bracket system (Synergy R) that produced a buccal root torque of approximately 5 N/mm at the bracket level. Using a split mouth design, randomization, and blinding, one side of the arch received LIPUS for 20 minutes per day for 4 weeks at an incident intensity of 30 mW/cm(2) of the transducers' surface area. The other side served as a self-control, which received a sham transducer. After 4 weeks, all first premolars were extracted and micro-computed tomographic analysis was performed on these extracted teeth. A linear mixed-model statistical analysis was used. Results: LIPUS-treated teeth showed significantly less total volume of resorption lacunae compared to control teeth by a mean difference of (0.54 ± 0.09 mm(3)) (P < .001) and percentage of root resorption by a mean difference of (0.33 ± 0.05 mm(3)) (P < .001). In addition, significantly fewer resorption lacunae were found on all root surfaces in the LIPUS group compared to the control except in the instance of the distal surface. Limitations: This study was performed on limited number of cases during a 4-week period. Conclusions: LIPUS minimizes root resorption when applied during torque tooth movement over a 4-week period.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To analyze the initial changes in salivary levels of periodontal pathogens after orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Materials and methods: The subjects consisted of 54 adult patients. The Simplified Oral Hygiene Index, Plaque Index, and Gingival Index were measured as periodontal parameters. Both the plaque and gingival indexes were obtained from the central and lateral incisors and first molars of both arches. Whole saliva and periodontal parameters were obtained at the following four time points: immediately before debonding (T1), 1 week after debonding (T2), 5 weeks after debonding (T3), and 13 weeks after debonding (T4). Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to determine salivary bacterial levels and periodontal parameters among the four time points after quantifying salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), and total bacteria using the real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: All periodontal parameters were significantly decreased immediately after debonding (T2). The salivary levels of total bacteria and Pg were decreased at T3, while Pi and Tf levels were decreased at T4. However, the amount of Aa and Fn remained at similar levels in saliva during the experimental period. Interestingly, Aa and Fn were present in saliva at higher levels than were Pg, Pi, and Tf. Conclusion: The higher salivary levels of Aa and Fn after debonding suggests that the risk of periodontal problems cannot be completely eliminated by the removal of fixed orthodontic appliances during the initial retention period, despite improved oral hygiene.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the psychosocial impact of the first 6 months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance among young adults and compare the results with those of a control group of patients awaiting treatment for malocclusion. Materials and methods: A study was conducted with a sample of 120 patients on a waiting list for orthodontic treatment at a university. The participants were allocated to an experimental group submitted to treatment and a control group awaiting treatment. The groups were matched for sex and age. All participants were instructed to answer the Brazilian version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) at baseline and after 6 months. Statistical analysis involved the Wilcoxon test for the total PIDAQ score and the score of each subscale. All patients participated until the end of the study. Results: Significant differences between baseline and the 6-month evaluation were found for the total PIDAQ score as well as the dental self-confidence and social impact subscales in both groups. No differences between baseline and the 6-month evaluation were found regarding the psychological impact or esthetic concern subscales in the control group. The patients in the experimental group reported greater esthetic impact 6 months after beginning treatment (P < .001). The first 6 months of orthodontic treatment seem to improve psychosocial impact. Conclusion: The first 6 months of orthodontic treatment seem to improve the psychosocial impact of malocclusion. The patients analyzed in the present study reported a greater esthetic impact and less psychological impact after 6 months of using an orthodontic appliance.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To evaluate age- and gender-related changes in the soft tissues, incisors, and gingival display during rest, speech, and posed smile. Materials and methods: A total of 265 participants (122 men, 143 women) ranging in age from 19 years to 60 years were recruited for this study. Participants were divided into one of the following four age groups: 19 to 24 years, 25 to 34 years, 35 to 44 years, and 45 to 60 years. Image capture was performed using standardized videographic methods. Each video produced pictures where measurements were performed: rest, speech, and smile positions. Results: A statistically significant gender dimorphism was apparent in most of the variables. There was a significant increase in the upper lip length and lip commissures height with aging and more markedly in men. A greater exposure of mandibular incisor with increasing age was a feature in both genders. With increasing age there was a significant decrease in maxillary incisor display, especially for men. Conclusions: After 25 years of age there is significant difference in the aging process between men and women. Gingival and maxillary incisor display during speech and smile is a youthful and feminine characteristic.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate cranial base characteristics in malocclusions with sagittal discrepancies. Materials and methods: An electronic search was performed in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. A fixed- or random-effect model was applied to calculate weighted mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) according to statistical heterogeneity. Outcome measures were anterior, posterior, and total cranial base length and cranial base angle. Sensitivity analysis and publication bias were conducted. Results: Twenty studies that together included 1121 Class I, 1051 Class II, and 730 Class III cases qualified for the final analysis. Class III malocclusion demonstrated significantly reduced anterior (95% CI: -1.74, -0.53; P < .001 vs Class I; 95% CI: -3.30, -2.09; P < .001 vs Class II) and total cranial base length (95% CI: -3.33, -1.36; P < .001 vs Class I; 95% CI: -7.38, -4.05; P < .001 vs Class II). Further, Class II patients showed significantly greater anterior and total cranial base length than did Class I patients (95% CI: 0.51, 1.87; P < .001 for SN; 95% CI: 2.20, 3.30; P < .001 for NBa). Cranial base angle was significantly smaller in Class III than in Class I (95% CI: -3.14, -0.93; P < .001 for NSBa; 95% CI: -2.73, -0.68; P = .001 for NSAr) and Class II malocclusions (95% CI: -5.73, -1.06; P = .004 for NSBa; 95% CI: -6.11, -1.92; P < .001 for NSAr) and greater in Class II than in Class I malocclusions (95% CI: 1.38, 2.38; P < .001 for NSBa). Conclusions: This meta-analysis showed that anterior and total cranial base length and cranial base angle were significantly smaller in Class III malocclusion than in Class I and Class II malocclusions, and that they were greater in Class II subjects compared to controls.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To compare the effects of different remineralization procedures on the surface roughness of teeth, shear bond strengths (SBSs), and Adhesive Remnant Index scores of self-etching primer (SEP) used to bond orthodontic brackets to previously treated demineralized enamel surfaces. Materials and methods: A total of 140 extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into seven equal groups. Group I was the control group. A demineralization procedure was performed in the other six groups. A remineralization procedure was performed before bonding by using casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate, fluoride, a microabrasion mixture (18% hydrochloric acid-fine pumice), a microabrasion agent, and resin infiltration in groups III to VII. Brackets were bonded using a self-etching primer/adhesive system. The specimens were tested for SBS. The roughness and morphology of the enamel surfaces were analyzed using profilometer and scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance, Tukey, and G-tests at the α = .05 level. Results: Significant differences were found in the SBS values among the seven groups (F = 32.69, P = .003). The lowest SBS value was found in group II (2.62 ± 1.46 MPa). No significant differences were found between groups I, III, and VII, between groups III and IV, or between groups V and VI. The differences in the roughness values were statistically significant among the groups (P = .002). Conclusions: Remineralization procedures restore the decreased SBS of orthodontic brackets and decrease surface roughness caused by enamel demineralization. SEPs provide clinically acceptable SBS values for bonding orthodontic brackets to previously treated demineralized enamel surfaces.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Angle Orthodontist