Journal of allied health (J Allied Health)

Publisher: Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions; American Society of Allied Health Professions, Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions

Journal description

The Journal of Allied Health is the official publication of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) . The Journal is the only interdisciplinary allied health periodical, publishing scholarly works related to research and development, feature articles, research abstracts and book reviews.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Journal Of Allied Health website
Other titles Journal of allied health
ISSN 1945-404X
OCLC 1785629
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions

  • Pre-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Permission must be obtained from the publisher
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • On institutional server only
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used
    • Applies to Journal of Allied Health
  • Classification
    white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: To examine the change in nutrition and dietetic students' perceived readiness to practice after completing three Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE). Subjects: 37 students (mean age 26.6±5.4 yrs, 95% female) from the Schools of Public Health and Allied Health Professions enrolled in a medical nutrition therapy course. Methods: Using a pre-post test design, 37 students completed the first 3 weeks of the laboratory section of the course at the medical center, followed by 3 weeks of OSCE. OSCE stations included reviewing a chart, counseling a standardized patient, and discussing findings with other healthcare professionals. Students answered the Perceived Readiness for Dietetic Practice questionnaire before and after the OSCE. Results: OSCE significantly improved students' mean readiness to practice their role as clinical dietitians (4.9±2.5 vs 5.8±1.9, p=0.03). There was a significant improvement in the professional role (p=0.04) and charting (p=0.01). Students improved in all areas, but not all areas reached statistical significance. Seventy-six percent of students found the OSCE to be superior to the medical center experience, and 78% of students agreed that collaboration with other healthcare professionals helped prepare them for the dietetic role. Conclusion: The OSCE experience improved students' perceived clinical skills. The OSCE format can provide a realistic patient experience for dietetic students to develop their patient evaluation and counseling skills.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To examine the characteristics of effective preceptors, using the perceptions of students who are enrolled in a Dietetic Internship (DI), and to evaluate the influence of the following factors on preceptor behavior: a preceptors' area of practice, credentials, and type of DI program where the student is enrolled. Methods: Three hundred fifty-one students from 129 randomly selected DI programs completed an online survey to evaluate their preceptors, using a 40-item Preceptor Behavior Scale that included four categories: knowledge and professional competence, interpersonal skills, personality characteristics, and teaching ability. Results: The students ranked knowledge and professional competence as the most important category for effective preceptors. Teaching ability had the largest difference in mean scores between an effective and ineffective preceptor. Preceptors who were considered more effective included: a) preceptors in clinical and "other" practice areas such as community and private practice vs those in food service; b) preceptors who were registered dietitians (RD) vs non-RD; and c) preceptors in hospital-based DI programs vs university-based DI programs. Conclusions: Preceptor training should emphasize skills in all of the categories from the Preceptor Behavior Scale so that preceptors can effectively help students meet the competencies required for entry-level practice. A web-based preceptor training module that can reach offsite preceptors should be developed that includes scenarios for all areas of practice, teaching skills based on the principles of adult learning, and a credential and/or a professional incentive.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: Methods: Twenty-six articles relating to physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), radiologist assistants (RAs), and nuclear medicine advanced associates (NMAAs) were reviewed to discern similarities and differences in history, scope of practice, and roles in the medical imaging field. Results: The literature showed PAs and NPs are working mostly in interventional radiology. PAs, NPs, and RAs perform similar tasks in radiology, including history and physicals, evaluation and management, preprocedure work-up, obtaining informed consent, initial observations/reports, and post-procedure follow-up. NPs and PAs perform a variety of procedures but most commonly vascular access, paracentesis, and thoracentesis. RAs perform gastrointestinal, genitourinary, nonvascular invasive fluoroscopy procedures, and vascular access procedures. The review revealed NMAAs are working in an advanced role, but no specific performances of procedures was found in the literature, only suggested tasks and clinical competencies. Conclusion: PAs, NPs, and RAs are currently the three main midlevel providers used in medical imaging. These midlevel providers are being used in a variety of ways to increase the efficiency of the radiologist and provide diagnostic and therapeutic radiologic procedures to patients. NMAAs are being used in medical imaging but little literature is available on current roles in clinical practice. More research is needed to assess the exact procedures and duties being performed by these medical imaging physician extenders.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: Some members of the Editorial Board for the Journal of Allied Health met in Scottsdale, AZ, on October 28, 2015. All agreed that it is not advisable to have an Impact Factor for our publication. Part of the reasoning for this decision is that the Journal already fares well in a meaningful way. According to data compiled by the firm Publishing Technology, among 16,200 journals, the Journal ranked 41st as measured by the number of downloads from September 1 to September 30, 2015. The fact that the Journal of Allied Health consistently is listed among the top 100 indicates that some readers find value in accessing some of its articles.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Students who enter a physical therapist (PT) entry-level program with weak critical thinking skills may not be prepared to benefit from the educational training program or successfully engage in the future as a competent healthcare provider. Therefore, assessing PT students' entry-level critical thinking skills and/or disposition toward critical thinking may be beneficial to identifying students with poor, fair, or good critical thinking ability as one of the criteria used in the admissions process into a professional program. Participants/methods: First-year students (n=71) from the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center completed the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST), the California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory (CCTDI), and demographic survey during orientation to the DPT program. Three students were lost from the CCTST (n=68), and none lost from the CCTDI (n=71). Outcomes: Analysis indicated that the majority of students had a positive disposition toward critical thinking, yet the overall CCTST suggested that these students were somewhat below the national average. Also, individuals taking math and science prerequisites at the community-college level tended to have lower overall CCTST scores. Conclusion: The entering DPT class demonstrated moderate or middle range scores in critical thinking and disposition toward critical thinking. This result does not indicate, but might suggest, the potential for learning challenges. Assessing critical thinking skills as part of the admissions process may prove advantageous.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Teamwork has become an integral part of health care delivery. Such emphasis on teamwork has generated the need to systematically measure and improve the learning and performance of health care teams. The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive assessment instrument, the Interprofessional Education and Practice Inventory (IPEPI), to evaluate learning and performance in interprofessional health care teams. Methods: The 12-month study commenced in three 4-month phases: (1) a panel of 25 national and international experts participated in the Delphi process to identify factors influencing team learning and team performance; (2) the research team analyzed the findings from the two Delphi rounds to develop the IPEPI; and (3) a cohort of 27 students at the university engaged in clinical simulations to test and refine the IPEPI. Results: Findings suggest key factors that significantly influence team learning and performance include whether the group is able to foster a climate of mutual respect, adopt effective communication strategies, develop a sense of trust, and invite contributions from others. Additionally, in assessing organizational factors, participants indicated those factors that significantly influence team learning and performance include whether the organization is patient-centered, creates a culture of safety (not blame), and supports individual and team learning. Conclusions: These findings highlight the critical role assessment plays in enhancing not just interprofessional education or interprofessional practice, but in essence advancing interprofessional education and practice--which requires an integrated examination of how health care professionals learn and perform in teams.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: The Interprofessional Professionalism Collaborative has proposed the concept interprofessional professionalism to integrate professionalism, traditionally interpreted as a standard of conduct internal to each health profession, with the growing importance of interprofessional collaborative practice. To date, however, concepts and theories promoting interprofessionalism have had difficulty overcoming powerful centripetal forces that draw health professions students ever deeper toward the center of their separate professional identities. Professional identity does not form by concepts and theories alone. Compelling images and narratives that portray the sources and means of health and healing also shape and motivate professional identity formation. In the literature on social support and the social determinants of health, health and healing are social processes, the results of people's embeddedness in supportive social structures and community. In this narrative, becoming a health professional is, metaphorically, the act of "joining the healing community." This is an alternative to dominant narratives in which health and healing appear to be products of technical prowess wielded by individual experts. Reinforcing the metaphor of "joining the healing community" through the formal and informal curriculum might enhance the ability of health professions education to promote professional identity formation that intertwines excellence and mastery in one's own chosen profession with a sincere commitment to collaborative colleagueship.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: Botulinum toxin A (Botox A) is widely prescribed for the management of spasticity due to stroke, and many patients receive repeated injections because the paralyzing effect diminishes after 3 to 4 months. There are many studies that report local complications of Botox A at the injected site. However, little is known about non-local or systemic adverse events with repeated injections. The purpose of this research was to examine published data about adverse effects of repeated Botox A injections. MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PEDro databases were searched for articles that report adverse effects from Botox A injections for reduction of post-stroke spasticity in adults. Based on studies selected for review, the adverse effects from Botox A injections can be classified into local, systemic, and subclinical types. Systemic and subclinical adverse effects are not commonly reported and need further studies. Therapists and the rehabilitation team need to be aware of the potential of these risk factors that may affect the participation of patients undergoing rehabilitation, and therefore other alternatives to these injections may need to be considered.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the perceptions of deans and faculty members of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) concerning the degree to which their institutions implement and integrate the structural, human resource, political, and symbolic frames or dimensions of interprofessional education (IPE). The study identified correlations among these frames/dimensions, including their relationship with overall IPE program progress and success. This study utilized a nonexperimental comparative descriptive and correlational survey design. The instrument was developed by the researchers and administered online using a readily accessible data collection process. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Content validity and reliability were established prior to full implementation of the survey. Results revealed high levels of interest but lower levels of progress and success in implementing the various frames/dimensions of IPE. Strong correlations existed between the structural, human resource, political, and symbolic dimensions of IPE, and these dimensions individually and collectively predicted overall IPE program progress and success. The differences between interest and performance raised important questions and led to conclusions about leadership effectiveness, organizational clarity, and the process of implementing the organizational change needed for effective IPE at ASAHP institutions.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: While health professions educators espouse the need to develop lifelong learning skills in students, little is written about such attempts. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of educational and awareness interventions designed to promote self-regulated learning processes as a means to improve lifelong learning skills. First-year students in respiratory care and radiologic imaging sciences took the Learning and Study Skills Inventory (LASSI) in fall and spring semesters. They made the decision to use or not use educational resources in an online course focused on self-regulated learning skills. All students maintained a journal and responded to prompts about changes in their study skills. Final grades, reported in percentages, from selected required courses for fall and spring semesters were recorded. There were no substantive effects of the intervention (LASSI and online resources) as measured by the LASSI and course averages. Qualitative analysis indicated that students valued the LASSI and the online resources and that they altered their study skills as they perceived the need. Suggestions for future work include continued use of the LASSI, integration of self-regulated learning strategies into courses with role-modeling by faculty, and the use of microanalytic protocols.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: Postsecondary education institutions have enjoyed increased access to student populations with the advent of online programs. Diploma mills have also been able to proliferate in this newly realized and ever expanding academic market. In response, the US Department of Education implemented new regulations in 2010 that require institutions to adhere to state authorization requirements to continue eligibility to receive Title IV funding. The regulations were challenged in federal court and the regulations were rescinded, due to a failure to properly vet the regulations. The Department of Education has drafted and vetted a new set of regulations that have yet to be implemented. State authorization has left institutions scrambling to find a pragmatic solution to conform to the regulations, which has led to the creation of the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements. These agreements permit states to acknowledge the accreditation merit of institutions from other states and satisfy federal requirements. It will likely be several years before the full effect of state authorization and online education will be realized.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: Assessing the learning styles of nontraditional graduate students and their adaptation to the fieldwork context is important for the achievement of educational success. A non-experimental mixed-methods design examining learning styles, fieldwork performance, and adaptation to the clinical setting in a sample of 84 graduate nontraditional occupational therapy students. Kolb's Learning Style Inventory and the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation were the outcome measures. Select participants completed a 1-hr interview and reflection on their fieldwork. The Accommodating style was favored (n=37, 44%) with a strong preference for the active experimentation phase of learning (n=38, 45%). MANOVA tests confirmed a significant relationship of learning styles (F(7,71)=2.62, p=0.018) and phases of learning (F(21,198.7)=2.10, p<0.01) with fieldwork performance. Qualitative data indicated that students experiencing difficulty during fieldwork conveyed low self-awareness about their learning approach and used limited diversity of methods to adapt to the fieldwork setting. Recognizing learning styles and adjusting the approach to the learning conditions have relevance for maximizing outcomes. Educators in allied health fields may consider designing instructional activities that advance students' awareness of their preferences and support the use of diverse approaches for success in various learning contexts.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: Proficiency in areas of task completion, information processing, and time management are important attributes for successful academic performance and can be assessed using the Learning Assessment Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). The purpose of this study was to determine if there were differences in learning strategies across four behavioral profiles using the DISC style analysis (Dominance, Influence, Steadiness, Compliance). Graduate health professions students (n=247) were administered the DISC and LASSI to assess study strategy categories based on their natural DISC behavioral style. A one-way ANOVA was used to assess differences for 10 LASSI category scores across the four DISC profiles; scores were also compared with national percentile scores. The D and C profiles were above the 75th percentile for information processing, but below the 50th percentile for self-testing. The S profile had significantly lower scores (p<0.005) for information processing and was below the 50th percentile for anxiety (i.e., higher anxiety). The I profile was below the 50th percentile for time management and concentration to academic tasks. The data are in close agreement with recognized behaviors specific for each behavioral style and suggest that behavioral style should be considered an important factor in academic performance.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of allied health
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    ABSTRACT: While the ink still was drying on this issue of the Journal of Allied Health, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) reached the ripe old age of 5-and-1/2 years. Simply mentioning this law to a great many members of Congress is the equivalent of administering a prick with a hot needle. Depending on whose opinions are sought, this significant piece of social legislation is considered either a monumental health policy triumph (according to a majority of Democrats) or a pitiful debacle (according to a majority of Republicans) in both chambers. Their respective points of view are aided and abetted by a small army of cheerleaders on the sidelines who inhabit pundit domains in foundations, think tanks, university policy centers, and radio/TV talk shows. Except in rare instances, neither side will admit that their opponents might be correct about some aspects of the law, because there really is not much pleasure derived from doing so. Despite their many enthusiastic proclamations regarding the ACA, it is not possible for both sides of the present controversy to be entirely correct. Hence, this essay represents an effort to describe various benefits associated with this key piece of legislation, along with some of its shortcomings.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of allied health