Population Health Management

Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert

Current impact factor: 1.51

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.509
2013 Impact Factor 1.347
2012 Impact Factor 1.182
2011 Impact Factor 1.024
2010 Impact Factor 0.754
2009 Impact Factor 0.529

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.48
Cited half-life 3.20
Immediacy index 0.11
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.58
ISSN 1942-7905
OCLC 231763671
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Mary Ann Liebert

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website
    • On institutional repository, pre-print server or research network after 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Set statement to accompany deposit (see policy)
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • NIH authors will have their final paper, (post peer review, copy-editing and proof-reading) deposited in PubMed Central on their behalf
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a principal cause of serious illness, including bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia, worldwide. Pneumococcal immunization is proven to reduce morbidity and mortality in high-risk adult and elderly populations. Current pneumococcal vaccination practices are suboptimal in part because of recommendation complexity, the high cost of provider-driven immunization interventions, and outreach methods that are not patient-centric. These barriers are amplified within the safety net. This paper identifies efforts by the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services to increase pneumococcal immunization rates for adult indigent patient populations. A 4-part approach will be used to increase vaccination rates: (1) protocol driven care, (2) staff education, (3) electronic identification of eligible patients, and (4) automated patient outreach and scheduling. The proposed analytics plan and potential for scalability are described. (Population Health Management 2016;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Population Health Management

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: Regular physical activity is strongly linked to prevention of costly chronic health conditions. However, there has been limited examination of the impact that level of participation in physical activity promotion programs has on health care costs. This study examined a fitness reimbursement program (FRP) offered to small employers. FRP participants received $20 reimbursement every month they visited their fitness center ≥12 days. Visits were recorded electronically. Participants were assigned to 4 mutually exclusive cohorts by mean monthly fitness center visits: low (<4 visits); low-moderate (≥4 and <8 visits), high-moderate (≥8 and <12 visits), and high (≥12 visits, which qualified for reimbursement). Cohorts were matched by inverse propensity score weighting on demographic, health status, health care supply, and socioeconomic characteristics. Between-cohort differences in propensity score-weighted health care costs, starting from FRP program sign-up, were examined with a generalized linear model. Analyses were conducted with and without high-cost outliers during the pre- and post-FRP period. A total of 8723 participants (mean follow-up: 11.1 months) were identified during October 2010-June 2013. With high-cost outliers removed (n = 226), a pattern of lower per-member-per-month health care costs was observed with increasing participation: compared with the low cohort, monthly savings were: $6.14 (2.6%) for low-moderate (P = 0.60), $16.40 (6.9%) for moderate-high (P = 0.16), and $20.01 (8.4%) for high (P = 0.08). With high-cost outliers included, significant monthly cost savings were observed for the moderate-high ($43.52, P < 0.01) and high ($52.66, P < 0.001) cohorts. These results indicate directionally positive cost outcomes associated with increasing level of fitness center participation. (Population Health Management 2015;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: A common acute condition seen by providers in retails clinics is the evaluation and treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) in children younger than age 20. Annual direct treatment costs for AOM were US $5.3 billion in 1998 dollars. Based on the experience of a large retail pharmacy employer, the authors compared AOM episodes in covered dependents younger than age 20 in retail clinic states to those in states without retail clinic access. Relative costs as well as frequency of visits and antibiotic prescriptions were analyzed for both retail clinic-based, and non-retail clinic-based episodes. Rates of AOM episodes were lower in retail clinic than in non-retail clinic states (62.5 vs. 76.9 per 1000 members per year; P < .0001). The average number of visits per episode was similar between retail clinic and non-retail clinic states (1.417 vs. 1.430, respectively; P = 0.657), suggesting that retail clinics do not result in an increase in overall utilization. On a risk-adjusted basis, retail clinic episodes cost approximately $30-$130 less than community episodes, depending on year. In retail clinic states, the antibiotic prescription fill rate was 95.4% for retail clinic episodes and 82.8% for community episodes, consistent with rates in the literature. This study confirms results of earlier studies that retail clinics are a less costly setting than the community for the treatment of episodes of otitis media There also is little evidence that retail clinics lead to duplication of services (patients receiving follow-up care in other settings). (Population Health Management 20xx;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: This is a single-arm, pre and post effectiveness study that evaluated the impact of a comprehensive workplace lifestyle program on severe obesity among high cardiovascular disease risk individuals in a large, diverse employee population. Employees of Baptist Health South Florida were considered eligible to participate if they had 2 or more of the following cardiometabolic risk factors: total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL, systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%, body mass index ≥30kg/m(2). Participants received a personalized diet plan and physical activity intervention, and were followed for 1 year. Data on anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood glucose, and other biochemical measures were collected. Participants' body mass index was calculated and their eligibility for bariatric surgery (BS) also assessed. A total of 297 persons participated in the program; 160 participants completed all procedures through 12 months of follow-up. At baseline, 34% (n = 100) of all participants were eligible for BS. In an intention-to-treat analysis, 27% (n = 27) of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible after 12 months. Considering program completers only, 46% of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible. Irrespective of BS eligibility at 12 months, mean values of cardiometabolic risk factors among program completers improved after the follow-up period. Workplace wellness programs provide an important option for weight loss that can obviate the need for BS, reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and potentially reduce costs. However, in designing future worksite lifestyle interventions, measures should be taken to improve participation and retention rates in such programs. (Population Health Management 2015;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Population Health Management

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: Well-being is linked to important societal factors such as health care costs and productivity and has experienced a surge in development activity of both theories and measurement. This study builds on validation of the Well-Being 5 survey and for the first time applies Item Response Theory, a modern and flexible measurement paradigm, to form the basis of adaptive population well-being measurement. Adaptive testing allows survey questions to be administered selectively, thereby reducing the number of questions required of the participant. After the graded response model was fit to a sample of size N = 12,035, theta scores were estimated based on both the full-item bank and a simulation of Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). Comparisons of these 2 sets of score estimates with each other and of their correlations with external outcomes of job performance, absenteeism, and hospital admissions demonstrate that the CAT well-being scores maintain accuracy and validity. The simulation indicates that the average survey taker can expect a reduction in number of items administered during the CAT process of almost 50%. An increase in efficiency of this extent is of considerable value because of the time savings during the administration of the survey and the potential improvement of user experience, which in turn can help secure the success of a total population-based well-being improvement program. (Population Health Management 2015;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: Health coach programs using low-cost unlicensed providers have largely targeted uninsured or underserved populations, raising questions about uptake and effectiveness for insured patients. This observational study evaluated the referral process, uptake, and effectiveness of a health coach program for patients with diabetes and/or hypertension at a multispecialty clinic. Data included appointment observations; interviews with patients, physicians, and health coaches; patient and physician characteristics; and measures of utilization and clinical outcomes. Out of 1313 eligible patients, 308 (23.5%) were referred over a 12-month period and 169 (54.9%) had at least 1 health coach appointment. Although the health coach program did not change patients' biometrics, physicians and patients reported improved care processes and reduced physician workload. Barriers to enrollment included variability in physician referral practices, patient willingness, and scheduling difficulties. Modifications to physician and health coach workflow are needed to determine the program's true effectiveness. (Population Health Management 2015;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: Several countries with highly ranked delivery systems have implemented locally-based, publicly-funded primary health care organizations (PHCOs) as vehicles to strengthen their primary care foundations. In the United States, state governments have started down a similar pathway with models that share similarities with international PHCOs. The objective of this study was to determine if these kinds of organizations were working with primary care practices to improve their ability to provide comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible patient-centered care that met quality, safety, and efficiency outcomes-all core attributes of a medical home. This qualitative study looked at 4 different PHCO models-3 from the United States and 1 from Australia-with similar objectives and scope. Primary and secondary data included semi-structured interviews with 26 PHCOs and a review of government documents. The study found that the 4 PHCO models were engaging practices to meet a number of medical home expectations, but the US PHCOs were more uniform in efforts to work with practices and focused on arranging services to meet the needs of complex patients. There was significant variation in level of effort between the Australian PHCOs. These differences can be explained through the state governments' selection of payment models and use of data frameworks to support collaboration and incentivize performance of both PHCOs and practices. These findings offer policy lessons to inform health reform efforts under way to better capitalize on the potential of PHCOs to support a high-functioning primary health foundation as an essential component to a reformed health system. (Population Health Management 2015;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: In the movement to improve the health of patients with multiple chronic conditions and vulnerabilities, while reducing the need for hospitalizations, care management programs have garnered wide attention and support. The qualitative data presented in this paper sheds new light on key components of successful chronic care management programs. By going beyond a task- and temporal-based framework, this analysis identifies and defines the importance of "authentic healing relationships" in driving individual and systemic change. Drawing on the voices of 30 former clients of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers, the investigators use qualitative methods to identify and elaborate the core elements of the authentic healing relationship-security, genuineness, and continuity-a relationship that is linked to patient motivation and active health management. Although not readily found in the traditional health care delivery system, these authentic healing relationships present significant implications for addressing the persistent health-related needs of patients with frequent hospitalizations. (Population Health Management 2015;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: The HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a critical public health issue in the United States, where an estimated 1.2 million individuals live with HIV infection. Viral suppression is one of the primary public health goals for People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). A crucial component of this goal involves adequate access to health care, specifically anti-retroviral HIV medications. The enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010 raised hopes for millions of PLWHA without access to health care coverage. High cost-sharing requirements enacted by health plans place a financial burden on PLWHA who need ongoing access to these life-saving medications. Plighted with poverty, Detroit, Michigan, is a center of attention for examining the financial burden of HIV medications on PLWHA under the new health plans. From November 2014 to January 2015, monthly out-of-pocket costs and medication utilization requirements for 31 HIV medications were examined for the top 12 insurance carriers offering Qualified Health Plans on Michigan's Health Insurance Marketplace Exchange. The percentage of medications requiring quantity limits and prior authorization were calculated. The average monthly out-of-pocket cost per person ranged from $12 to $667 per medication. Three insurance carriers placed all 31 HIV medications on the highest cost-sharing tier, charging 50% coinsurance. High out-of-pocket costs and medication utilization restrictions discourage PLWHA from enrolling in health plans and threaten interrupted medication adherence, drug resistance, and increased risk of viral transmission. Health plans inflicting high costs and medication restrictions violate provisions of the ACA and undermine health care quality for PLWHA. (Population Health Management 2015;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: Healthcare systems often face competing goals and priorities, which make their reforms challenging. This study analyzed factors influencing the success of a healthcare system based on urban health insurance reform evolvement in China, and offered recommendations for improvement. Findings based on health insurance reform strategies and mechanisms that worked or not, can effectively inform the improvement of health insurance system design and practice, and the overall healthcare system performance, including equity, efficiency, effectiveness, cost, finance, access, and coverage, both in China and other countries. This study is the first to use historical comparison to examine the success and failure of China’s healthcare system over time before and after the economic reform in the 1980s. This study is also among the first to analyze the determinants of Chinese health system effectiveness by relating its performance to both technical reasons within the health system and underlying nontechnical characteristics outside the health system, including socioeconomics, politics, culture, value, and belief. In conclusion, a health insurance system is successful when it fits its social environment, economic framework, and cultural context, which translates to congruent healthcare policies, strategies, organization, and delivery. No health system can survive without its deeply rooted socioeconomic environment and cultural context. That is why one society should be cautious not to radically switch from a successful model to an entirely different one over time. There is no perfect health system model suitable for every population, but only appropriate ones for specific nations and specific populations at the right place and right time.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: Few studies have evaluated the effects of lifestyle habits, such as eating behaviors, on the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It is known that NAFLD increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, a retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the effect of eating behaviors and interactions between these behaviors on the development of NAFLD among health insurance beneficiaries without NAFLD. Study subjects were 2254 male and female insurance beneficiaries without NAFLD who had attended specific health checkups during fiscal years 2009 and 2012 among health insurance societies located in Fukuoka and Shizuoka Prefectures (Japan). The incidence of NAFLD was defined as Fatty Liver Index scores ≥60 or visiting medical organizations for fatty liver disease treatment according to claims data. Eating behaviors, including eating speed and eating before bedtime, were evaluated by a self-administered questionnaire. During the study period, 52 (2.3%) subjects progressed to NAFLD. Subjects who ate before bedtime but did not eat fast had a higher risk of NAFLD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.15; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-4.46). Those with both negative eating habits had a significantly higher risk of NAFLD (AOR = 2.48; 95% CI: 1.09-5.63). Subjects who habitually ate before bedtime, and those who ate fast and before bedtime, tended to have an increased risk of NAFLD. Earlier intervention to modify these poor eating behaviors could be useful to prevent NAFLD. (Population Health Management 2015;xx:xxx-xxx).
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: In the spring of 2014, the North Dakota Center for Rural Health (CRH) was tasked with completing an objective assessment of the state oral health environment. This included an assessment of oral health status, review of workforce needs, evaluation of current oral health programs, and policy recommendations to ameliorate identified oral health needs. The report was prepared for the North Dakota Legislative Health Services Interim Committee. This article highlights a research method developed and employed to identify current population health status and policy recommendations through statewide collaboration, transparent process, and objective analyses, regardless of the health specialty of focus. Evidenced-based decision making in health policy requires more than presentation of data. It requires input from the population or community utilizing or struggling to gain access to the given health service. It is now understood that health services researchers must employ a variety of research methods, include end users in the research process, tailor presentation of the findings for the appropriate audience, and include the population of study in the research, allowing them to provide recommended solutions when possible. Although the effort to be described focused specifically on oral health in North Dakota, the methodologies used to answer the research questions could, and are encouraged to, be employed in other states with regard to other specialty health disciplines and population health studies. The study sought to answer 3 questions: (1) What is the population health need?; (2) What is already being done?; and (3) What are the recommendations to improve population health? (Population Health Management 20xx;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Population Health Management
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    ABSTRACT: Health care organizations continue to look for cost-effective ways to modify patient behaviors toward a healthier lifestyle, including improving compliance with evidence-based treatment guidelines. This study evaluated the impact on compliance to evidence-based guidelines associated with a member messaging program (MMP) that is delivered via hard copy through the mail and also electronically via web portals. Anonymized member data were reviewed using disease-specific algorithms designed to find gaps in evidence-based care. Gap closure was monitored over a 6-month period after identification and was the main outcome under study. MMP members received at least 1 message describing a specific gap in care identified via claims data. In addition, if a match was possible, the same message also was sent to the member's physician. MMP members were then compared to a cohort not receiving messages but having the same gaps in care. Multiple regression analysis was performed using a generalized linear model with gap closure as the outcome to infer the relationship between receiving a notification and closing a gap in care. Of the 140 gaps addressed in the study, 23 showed a statistically significant (P < 0.05) difference in gap closure rates between the messaged group and the non-messaged group. Diabetes-related gap closures accounted for 10 of the 23 significant outcomes. Messages notifying of a gap in care can influence member health care adherence to evidence-based guidelines, particularly with diabetes-related gaps in care. (Population Health Management 2015;xx:xxx-xxx).
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Population Health Management