The Open Orthopaedics Journal (Open Orthop J)

Publisher: Bentham Open

Journal description

The Open Orthopaedics Journal is an Open Access online journal, which publishes research articles, reviews, and letters in all areas of experimental and clinical research and surgery in orthopaedics. The Open Orthopaedics Journal, a peer-reviewed journal, aims to provide the most complete and reliable source of information on current developments in the field. The emphasis will be on publishing quality papers rapidly and freely available to researchers worldwide.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website The Open Orthopaedics Journal website
Other titles TOORJ
ISSN 1874-3250
OCLC 226370270
Material type Document, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Bentham Open

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website, institutional repository, open access repository, PubMed Central or ArXiv
    • Authors retain copyright
    • Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used
    • All titles are open access journals
    • Publisher last contacted on 12/12/2014
    • 'Bentham Open' is an imprint of 'Bentham Science Publishers'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

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    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Open Orthopaedics Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Even non-traumatic ruptures of the triceps tendon are rare, surgical therapy should be recommended in all cases, because of poor results after non-operative treatment. A golden standard for the surgical procedure is not established. A small series of traumatic distal tendon ruptures was treated surgical in our hospital and was followed up after 12 months concerning their function. Very good and good results could be found with a strong reintegration of the tendon by using transosseus sutures with non resorbable suture material. The refixation with suture anchors showed disappointing results with early pull-outs of the anchor. Revision with screw augmentation with a washer had to be performed. Concerning the biomechanical forces, which show up on the olecranon (up to 40 NM), the refixation of the triceps tendon has proved to be extremely resistant against pull out forces. The good results by using non absorbable transosseus sutures led to a standardized procedure in our trauma center, even the rupture is not traumatic.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Open Orthopaedics Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Unstable intertrochanteric fractures are difficult to manage and the choice of implant is critical for fracture fixation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of proximal femoral nail antirotationII (PFNA II) in the treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 45 patients of unstable intertrochanteric fractures, who were treated with the PFNA II between 2011 and 2013. Of which, 3 patients were died within 6 months of follow up. Hence, 42 patients were available for the study including 26 men and 16 women. The mean age was 61 years (range, 35 -90). Clinical evaluation was done using Harris hip score. The position of the blade in the femoral head was evaluated using Cleveland zones and tip apex distance. The fracture reduction was assessed using the Garden Alignment Index and postoperative fracture gap (mm) measurement. Results: The mean follow up period was 15.3 months (range, 9-27). Excellent to good results were accounted for 78% of cases according to Harris hip score. No cases of cut out or breakage of the implant noted. Implant removal was done in 2 patients due to persistent anterior thigh pain. Conclusion: We recommend PFNA II for fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures with less operative time and low complication rate. However, proper operative technique is important for achieving fracture stability and to avoid major complications.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Open Orthopaedics Journal
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    ABSTRACT: This article investigates the clinical and radiological features of four cases of osteochondroma-related bony pressure erosion in adults. Rare imaging features of extrinsic pressure erosions on adjacent bones caused by solitary and familial forms of osteochondroma are presented. Although described to occur uncommonly in the paired bones of the lower leg, pressure erosion in the pelvic girdle is poorly understood. In this article, we discuss clinical contexts for management of osteochondroma-related bony pressure erosion in the mature skeleton.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Open Orthopaedics Journal
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    Preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The Open Orthopaedics Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Management of unicameral bone cysts (UBC) remain controversial. These cysts seldom heal spontaneously or even after pathological fracture. Sometimes these cysts can be very large and incredibly troublesome to the patient. Various treatments exist with variable success rates. We present our experience of treating these lesions by continuous drainage. Over a seven year period, six patients with unicameral bone cysts were treated by inserting a modified drain into the wall of the cyst. The aim of surgery was to place the drain in a dependent area of the cyst, through the cortex allowing for continuous drainage. This was achieved through a small incision under radiographic control. A cement restrictor (usually used for femoral canal plugging during total hip replacements) was modified and inserted to prevent closure of the drain site. A redivac drain was passed through the plug into the cyst. The drain was left in place for a week to establish an epithelialized pathway which hopefully would remain patent, into the subcutaneous tissues, after the drain had been removed. There were four males and two females in the group and the age range was 6 -12 years. Four of the lesions were in the upper humerus, one in the proximal femur and the other one in the proximal tibia. Healing was rated according to the modified Neer classification. Grade 1 (healed) and Grade 2 (healed with defect) was defined as excellent outcome. Persistent /Recurrent cysts (Grade 3 and 4) were noted as unsatisfactory. Five cases were completely healed. Only one had a further fracture and there were no recurrent fractures. All the patients reported complete comfort and they all were able to re-engage in recreational activities without restriction. We think that reducing the intra-medullary pressure in these lesions will lead to healing. We report a safe and minimally invasive technique for the management of UBC.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · The Open Orthopaedics Journal
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    ABSTRACT: First metatarsalphalangeal joint arthrodesis is a well established and successful treatment; however there still remains controversy over the best choice of construct. We performed a retrospective study of patients undergoing first metatarsalphalangeal fusion over eighteen months (n=52) using either dorsal non-locking plate with additional compression lag screw fixation or dorsal non-locking plate alone. We found when assessing clinical criteria, patients with dorsal non-locking plates and additional compression lag screw fixation had a significantly higher rate of fusion (100% vs 77.8%), significantly higher rate of fusion within the first two months (55.6% vs 83.3%), significantly earlier time to fusion (52.2 days vs 75.6 days), and significantly lower rate of non-union (0% vs 22.2%). When blindly assessing radiographic criteria, the patients treated with the plate and compression screw had a significantly higher rate of fusion and lower rate of non-union (0% vs 33%). There was no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of complications in the groups. We believe that the interfragmentary compression is a crucial factor in achieving good union rates and recommend the use of non-locking pre-contoured plating with additional interfragmentary compression screw as the fixation method of choice for these procedures.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · The Open Orthopaedics Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Ankylosing spondylitis is a spondyloarthropathy affecting the sacro-iliac joints with subsequent progression to the spine and the hip joints. The hip joints are affected by synovitis, enthesial inflammation, involvement of medullary bone, progressive degeneration and secondary osteoarthritis. Clinical presentation is usually in the form of pain and stiffness progressing to disabling fixed flexion contractures and in some instances, complete ankylosis. Hip arthroplasty should be considered for hip pain, postural and functional disability, or pain in adjacent joints due to hip stiffness. We conducted a literature review to determine peri-operative considerations and outcome in ankylosing spondylitis patients undergoing hip arthroplasty. In this review, we have discussed pre-operative surgical planning, thromboprophylaxis, anaesthetic considerations and heterotopic ossification. Outcomes of arthroplasty include range of movement, pain relief, survivorship and complications.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · The Open Orthopaedics Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Total Knee Arthroplasty is an increasingly common procedure and revision surgery, particularly for infection, is associated with significant morbidity and healthcare costs. The current gold standard is a two stage revision procedure but single stage revision is increasingly being used in some departments to improve patient outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to determine the up-to-date evidence underlying the use of a single stage knee approach in revision surgery. A total of 12 studies were included in this review amounting to 433 revision surgeries. This is the largest review of single stage knee revision surgery. The procedures described were heterogenous and included the 'two-in-one' technique as well as other single stage revision procedures. There were also differences in implants and antibiotic regimens. The mean re-infection rates described in 10 studies was 9.4% (range 0-19.2%) after a mean follow-up of 40.3 months (range 7-180 months). The re-infection rates in the studies published over the last 30 years are falling, and this is not accounted for by any significant change in duration of follow-up during this period. The outcome scores varied, but patients generally showed an improvement. The Knee Society Score and the Oxford Knee Score were the most commonly used in five and three studies respectively. We conclude that the current evidence for single stage revision is variable and there is a lack of good quality evidence to address whether single stage revisions is thorough enough to eradicate deep infection and is able to restore adequate function. There is a need for larger prospective studies with standardised procedures and protocol, and with adequate follow-up. Till then, patients considered for a single stage approach should be thoroughly assessed and the surgery should be performed by a senior surgeon with experience in single stage knee revisions.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · The Open Orthopaedics Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Bilateral total knee arthroplasty can be performed either as a staged or simultaneous procedure. We conducted a retrospective comparative study to compare the need for transfusion, the length of procedure, the length of stay, and complications of bilateral simultaneous knee arthroplasty with those of unilateral knee arthroplasty. Sixty-nine patients who underwent bilateral simultaneous knee arthroplasty procedures were compared with a matched control group of 69 patients who underwent unilateral knee arthroplasty. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine optimum cut-off values. Both groups of patients had a similar age and gender distribution, preoperative haemoglobin and ASA scores. Cumulative transfusion episodes were lower in the bilateral group than twice that of the unilateral group. In multivariate analysis the preoperative haemoglobin level and bilateral procedures were independent factors predicting the need for transfusion. The average length of procedure and length of hospital stay in the bilateral group was less than twice than that of the unilateral group. Advanced age and bilateral procedures were independent predictors of prolonged length of stay. A haemoglobin level of 12.5 g/dL and age of 70 were most suitable cut-off points to predict need for transfusion and occurrence of medical complications respectively. We conclude that bilateral simultaneous knee arthroplasties are safe and cost effective in appropriately selected patients. We recommend avoiding bilateral simultaneous procedures in patients over the age of 70 years and with significant comorbidities.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · The Open Orthopaedics Journal