Pediatric Neurology (PEDIATR NEUROL)

Publisher: Elsevier

Journal description

Pediatric Neurology publishes timely peer-reviewed clinical and research articles covering all aspects of the developing nervous system.Pediatric Neurology features up-to-the-minute publication of the latest advances in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of pediatric neurologic disorders. The journal's editor, Kenneth F. Swaiman, MD, heads an internationally recognized editorial board, ensuring the most authoritative and extensive coverage of the field. Among the topics covered are: epilepsy, mitochondrial diseases, congenital malformations, chromosomopathies, peripheral neuropathies, perinatal and childhood stroke, cerebral palsy, as well as other diseases affecting the developing nervous system.

Current impact factor: 1.70

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.695
2013 Impact Factor 1.504
2012 Impact Factor 1.416
2011 Impact Factor 1.522
2010 Impact Factor 1.513
2009 Impact Factor 1.497
2008 Impact Factor 1.505
2007 Impact Factor 1.375
2006 Impact Factor 1.542
2005 Impact Factor 1.368
2004 Impact Factor 1.184
2003 Impact Factor 1.243
2002 Impact Factor 1.247
2001 Impact Factor 1.011
2000 Impact Factor 1.007
1999 Impact Factor 1.119
1998 Impact Factor 0.921
1997 Impact Factor 0.918

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.57
Cited half-life 8.00
Immediacy index 0.24
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.49
Website Pediatric Neurology website
Other titles Pediatric neurology
ISSN 1873-5150
OCLC 11930271
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors pre-print on any website, including arXiv and RePEC
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Author's post-print may be used to update arXiv and RepEC
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Author's post-print must be released with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/06/2015
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: We aimed to determine whether there was a decrease in the number of children diagnosed on the autism spectrum after the implementation of the new diagnostic criteria as outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders Fifth Edition published in May 2013. Method: We reviewed 1552 charts of children evaluated at the Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo, Autism Spectrum Disorders Clinic. A comparison was made of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (autism, Asperger disorder, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified) from 2010 to May 2013 using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria with children diagnosed from June 2013 through June 2015 under the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders Fifth Edition. Results: Using χ(2) analysis, the 2013-2015 rate of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis (39%) was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than the 2010 to May 2013 sample years rate (50%). Conclusion: The rate of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis was significantly lower under the recently implemented Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders Fifth Edition criteria.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Paraneoplastic manifestations may provide an early clue to underlying malignancies in children. Methods: We describe a 3-year-old girl with an unusual neurological paraneoplastic syndrome of steroid-responsive encephalopathy and dropped head syndrome associated with paraspinal neuroblastoma. Results: Cranial neuroimaging, metabolic screen, and thyroid functions were normal. Abdominal imaging identified a paraspinal neuroblastoma. Encephalopathy and neck extensor weakness responded to pulse corticosteroids followed by tumor resection. Conclusions: This is a unique report of paraneoplastic steroid-responsive encephalopathy and dropped head syndrome in association with neuroblastoma.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Melatonin modulates central nervous system neuronal activity. We compared the melatonin levels of patients with febrile and afebrile seizures during and after seizure with those of healthy controls. Methods: We enrolled 59 individuals with afebrile and febrile seizures (mean age, 6.09 ± 4.46 years) and 28 age-, sex-, and weight-matched healthy children. Melatonin levels were measured near the time of a seizure (0 to 1 hour) and at 12 and 24 hours post-seizure, and control melatonin levels were measured from a single venous blood sample. Results: Plasma melatonin levels increased during seizures in the study group (P < 0.001). Post-seizure plasma melatonin levels were significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (P < 0.05). Plasma melatonin levels did not differ between patients with afebrile seizures who had and had not used antiepileptic drugs. Daytime (8 AM to 8 PM) and nighttime (8 PM to 8 AM) post-seizure melatonin levels were not significantly different. Conclusions: Melatonin levels were lower in pediatric patients prone to seizures than in healthy children and increased during seizures. Further research is needed to test the role of melatonin in the pathophysiology and treatment of epilepsy.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: We examined attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in adolescents with epilepsy and the association with seizure-related and sociodemographic variables. Methods: Strengths and Weakness of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal Behaviors rating scale was administered to 122 children with epilepsy and 50 children with asthma, aged 10 to 18 years attending mainstream schools. Results: Twenty-nine (23.7%) adolescents with epilepsy compared with five (10%) with asthma had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (P = 0.037). Adolescents with epilepsy had a significantly higher score in the inattention subscale when compared with those with asthma (-0.25 ± 1.2 vs -0.64 ± 1.07, P = 0.049). Combined subtype was most frequent in the epilepsy group. Oppositional defiant disorders were more prevalent in those having attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Psychiatric assistance had only been provided to one third of our patients with epilepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at the time of study. There was a negative correlation between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder scores and age of seizure onset. A positive correlation was observed between the number of antiepileptic drugs and the inattentive subscale score. The impact of various correlates on individual subtypes was not identical. Independent risk factors associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were medical comorbidities (odds ratio = 12.82, 95% confidence interval 4.44, 37.03, P < 0.0001) and age at seizure onset (odds ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.56, 0.94, P = 0.016). Conclusions: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is overrepresented in adolescents with epilepsy; screening for its symptoms should be an integral part of management in adolescents with epilepsy.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Cyclic vomiting syndrome is characterized by recurrent vomiting that is associated with increased adrenocorticotropic hormone and antidiuretic hormone levels during cyclic vomiting syndrome attacks. However, both prognosis and treatment remain unclear. We therefore evaluated the clinical features, prognosis, and effectiveness of the prophylaxis of cyclic vomiting syndrome as well as the relationship between symptoms and adrenocorticotropic hormone/antidiuretic hormone levels. Methods: We included 31 patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome who were admitted to Teikyo University between 1996 and 2008. All patients were diagnosed with cyclic vomiting syndrome based on the criteria of the second edition of the International Headache Classification. The patients (25 of 31) were followed until 2013. Results: The median overall duration of the disorder was 66 (3-179) months. Follow-up was completed for 25 patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome, of whom 44% (n = 11) developed migraine. Valproic acid, valproic acid with phenobarbital, phenobarbital, and amitriptyline were effective in nine, four, three, and one patients, respectively. Abnormally high adrenocorticotropic hormone (n = 17) and antidiuretic hormone (n = 18) levels were found among the 25 patients for whom follow-up data were available. The following correlations were significant: attack duration and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels (correlation coefficient: 0.5153, P = 0.0084) and attack duration and antidiuretic hormone levels (correlation coefficient: 0.5666, P = 0.0031). Antidiuretic hormone levels in patients with bilious vomiting were higher than in those without bilious vomiting (P = 0.048). Conclusions: Most patients with cyclic vomiting syndrome recovered completely and benefited from prophylactic therapy, although half of them developed migraines.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder among children and adolescents that is associated with increased mortality for numerous reasons. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is a critically important entity for physicians who treat patients with epilepsy. Many pediatric neurologists are reserved in discussing this condition with patients and families because of the lower risk found in the pediatric age group. Methods: We searched for studies published between January 2000 and June 2015 by means of a PubMed search and a cumulative review of reference lists of all relevant publications, using the keywords" sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients", "pediatric SUDEP", "sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients and children", "sudden unexpected death in children" and "sudden infant death syndrome". Results: SUDEP is a rare condition in children. Its mechanism is poorly understood and may have a distinct pathogenesis from adult sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Limited comfort, experience, and knowledge to provide appropriate education about sudden unexpected death in epilepsy leads to fewer physicians discussing this subject resulting in less informed and less prepared patients and families. Conclusion: We provide a detailed review of the literature on pediatric SUDEP, including the definition, classification, and proposed mechanisms of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy in children, as well as discuss the incidence in the pediatric population and risk factors in children, concluding with possible prevention strategies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Chorioamnionitis is a risk factor for cerebral palsy. The relationship between extra-amniotic infections and cerebral palsy is less well studied. We examined maternal intra-amniotic and extra-amniotic infections and risk of cerebral palsy in the child. Methods: Among a retrospective cohort of 6 million Californian births, 1991-2001, we analyzed administrative maternal and newborn hospital discharge abstracts linked to records of all children receiving services for cerebral palsy at the California Department of Developmental Services. We identified maternal hospital diagnoses of intra-amniotic (chorioamnionitis) and extra-amniotic (other genitourinary and respiratory) infections occurring up to 12 months before delivery. Using multivariable logistic regression, we determined the independent association between maternal infections and cerebral palsy, adjusting for infant sex, maternal age, race, education, socioeconomic status, and obesity. Results: About 5.5% of mothers had a hospital discharge diagnosis of at least one of the following: chorioamnionitis (2.0%), other genitourinary (3.1%), and respiratory infection (0.6%). An infection diagnosis was more common in mothers of the 8473 infants with cerebral palsy than in mothers of unaffected children (13.7% vs 5.5%, P < 0.001). All three types of maternal infections (chorioamnionitis, odds ratio [OR] 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.9-3.4; other genitourinary infection, OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-1.6; and respiratory infection, OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.5-2.2) were associated with cerebral palsy in multivariable analyses. Maternal extra-amniotic infections, whether diagnosed during prenatal or birth hospitalizations, conferred an increased risk of cerebral palsy. Conclusions: Maternal extra-amniotic infections diagnosed in the hospital during pregnancy are associated with a modestly increased risk of cerebral palsy in the child.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Importance: Stroke-like episodes signal progression and significant disability in the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome. Arginine is widely used as a treatment for stroke-like episode, although there is little evidence for this intervention. We discuss the management of a patient with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes who presented with a stroke-like episode. Observation: During a seizure, which triggers the stroke-like episode, neurons are forced to utilize glycolysis as a source of adenosine triphosphate. Glycolytic by-products are damaging to the neuron. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier leads to vasogenic edema. Conclusion: Treatment of stroke-like episode should include anticonvulsants interictally to prevent seizures and dexamethasone ictally to help repair the blood-brain barrier.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Recently a single-center study suggested that hypertension after stroke in children was a risk factor for mortality. Our goal was to assess the association between hypertension and outcome after arterial ischemic stroke in children from a large national sample. Methods: Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database, children (1-18 years) with a primary diagnosis of ischemic stroke (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9] codes 433-437.1) who also had a diagnosis of elevated blood pressure (ICD-9 code 796.2) or hypertension (ICD-9 codes 401 and 405) from 2003, 2006, and 2009 were identified. Clinical characteristics, discharge outcomes, and length of stay were assessed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between hypertension and in-hospital mortality or discharge outcomes. Results: Of 2590 children admitted with arterial ischemic stroke, 156 (6%) also had a diagnosis of hypertension. Ten percent of children with hypertension also had renal failure. Among patients with arterial ischemic stroke, hypertension was associated with increased mortality (7.4% vs 2.8%; P = 0.01) and increased length of stay (mean 11 ± 17 vs 7 ± 12 days; P = 0.004) compared with those without hypertension. After adjusting for age, sex, intubation, presence of a fluid and electrolyte disorder, and renal failure, children with hypertension had an increased odds of in-hospital death (odds ratio 1.2, 95% confidence interval [1.1-3.3, P = 0.04]). Conclusion: Hypertension was associated with an increased risk of in-hospital death for children presenting with arterial ischemic stroke. Further prospective study of blood pressure in children with stroke is needed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Incontinentia pigmenti is a rare neurocutaneous disorder that may present neurological symptoms, in addition to characteristic skin rashes. The pathogenesis of central nervous system disorders in incontinentia pigmenti remains unclear, but it has been reported that vascular abnormalities and inflammatory processes may play important roles. Notably, there is no established treatment for central nervous system disorders in incontinentia pigmenti. We report a neonate with acute neurological symptoms of incontinentia pigmenti who was effectively treated with corticosteroid therapy. We review the literature and discuss the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of acute central nervous system disorders in incontinentia pigmenti. Patient description: A 15-day-old girl with incontinentia pigmenti showed neurological symptoms such as decreased level of consciousness and a weak sucking reflex. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple cerebral infarctions. We administered corticosteroid therapy, and the symptoms improved immediately and significantly. Conclusion: We suggest that corticosteroid therapy may be an effective treatment during the acute phase of central nervous system dysfunction due to incontinentia pigmenti. It is important to determine the existence of acute phase lesions on magnetic resonance imaging when neurological symptoms occur or worsen.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Our aim was to describe the relationship between risk factors, such as stress, depression, and anxiety, and potentially protective factors against pediatric headache-related disability, such as mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion, and to determine teens' interest in mind-body skills training to help reduce headache-related disability. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey among adolescents seen in an academic neurology clinic reporting four or more headaches monthly using standardized instruments to determine the relationship between putative risk and protective factors as well as physiologic markers of inflammation and vagal tone and headache-related disability. Results: Among the 29 participants, 31% were male, the average age was 14.8 years, average headache frequency was 11.6 per month, and the most commonly reported trigger was stress (86%). The only risk or protective factor significantly associated with headache-related disability was depression (r = 0.52, P = 0.004). Depression was negatively correlated with mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion (P < 0.01 each) and positively correlated with stress, sleep disturbance, and anxiety (P < 0.01 each). Biomarkers of vagal tone and inflammation were correlated with each other but not with headache-related disability or depression. There was strong interest in learning skills like slow, deep breathing practices supported by a smart phone application to reduce stress and the negative impact of headaches on daily life. Discussion: Among teens with frequent migraine headaches, depression is the strongest risk factor for headache-related disability. Stress is viewed as a headache trigger, and teens reported wanting to learn simple stress management strategies supported by a smart phone application to help reduce headache-related disability.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Pediatric Neurology

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Sleep problems affect 30% to 80% of patients with mild traumatic brain injury. We assessed the prevalence of sleep disorders after mild traumatic brain injury and its correlation with other symptoms. Methods and materials: Individuals with mild traumatic brain injury were assessed at the New York University Concussion Center during 2013-2014 with the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool, third edition, data following mild traumatic brain injury. The relationship between sleep problems (drowsiness, difficulty falling asleep, fatigue or low energy), psychiatric symptoms (sadness, nervousness or anxiousness), headache, and dizziness were analyzed by Spearman correlation and logistic regression using moderate to severe versus none to mild categorization. Results: Ninety-three patients were retrospectively considered. The most common injury causes were falls (34.4%) and motor vehicle accidents (21.5%). There was a positive correlation between dizziness, headache, psychiatric problems (sadness, anxiety, irritability), and sleep problems (fatigue, drowsiness, and difficulty falling asleep) (P < 0.001). Logistic regression showed a significant association between moderate to severe psychiatric symptoms and moderate to severe sleep symptoms (P < 0.05). Sleep symptoms became more severe with increased time interval from mild traumatic brain injury to Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3 administration (odds ratio = 1.005, 1.006, and 1.008, P < 0.05). There was significant correlation between motor vehicle accident and drowsiness and difficulty falling asleep (P < 0.05). Medications given in the emergency department had a positive correlation with drowsiness (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Individuals who report moderate to severe headache, dizziness, and psychiatric symptoms have a higher likelihood of reporting moderate to severe sleep disorders following mild traumatic brain injury and should be counseled and initiated with early interventions.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: To report an atypical case of multiple sulfatase deficiency. Methods: Multiple sulfatase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inherited lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the absence of several sulfatases and caused by mutations in the gene encoding the human C (alpha)-formylglycine-generating enzyme. There have been a variety of biochemical and clinical presentations reported in this disorder. We present a 4-year-old girl with clinical findings of microcephaly, spondylolisthesis and neurological regression without ichthyosis, coarse facies, and organomegaly. Results: The patient's magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated confluent white matter abnormalities involving the periventricular and deep cerebral white matter with the U-fibers relatively spared. Biochemical testing showing low arylsulfatase A levels were initially thought to be consistent with a diagnosis of metachromatic leukodystrophy. The diagnosis of multiple sulfatase deficiency was pursued when genetic testing for metachromatic leukodystrophy was negative. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates the clinical heterogeneity that can be seen in multiple sulfatase deficiency and that this disorder can be present even in the absence of the classic clinical features.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Pediatric Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Dystonia due to spinal lesions in adult patients is characterized by the provocation and/or amelioration of the spasm by somatosensory stimulation with a sensory trick. Patient description: An infant with brachytelephalangic chondrodysplasia punctata developed flaccid tetraplegia due to cervical cord compression resulting from congenital atlantoaxial dislocation. Episodic, tonic extension of the extremities, neck, and trunk had appeared daily since age two years and was often provoked by tactile stimulation. Although decompression surgery was performed at age three years, progressive spinal deformity resulted in the aggravation of episodic dystonia thereafter, lasting for hours. Foot dorsiflexion and wearing a truncal brace for scoliosis inhibited these spasms. Intrathecal baclofen bolus injection transiently ameliorated the paroxysmal dystonia and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia in the lower urinary tract. Conclusion: Paroxysmal dystonia is unusual in children with spinal cord lesions; however, it should be recognized for appropriate individualized clinical management.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Pediatric Neurology