Autoimmunity reviews

Publisher: Elsevier

Current impact factor: 7.93

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 7.933
2013 Impact Factor 7.095
2012 Impact Factor 7.975
2011 Impact Factor 6.624
2010 Impact Factor 6.556
2009 Impact Factor 6.368
2008 Impact Factor 5.371
2007 Impact Factor 3.862
2006 Impact Factor 3.76
2005 Impact Factor 3.091

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 5.96
Cited half-life 3.50
Immediacy index 2.98
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 1.40
ISSN 1873-0183

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors pre-print on any website, including arXiv and RePEC
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Author's post-print may be used to update arXiv and RepEC
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Author's post-print must be released with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/06/2015
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPAN) is a rare disease that affects small and middle caliber vessels of the deep dermis and subcutaneous tissue and its etiopathology remains yet to be understood. Methods: Retrospective review of twenty two cases diagnosed as CPAN and confirmed by skin biopsy over the last 11 years was evaluated in our department. Results: We found predominance in white woman, mean age of 39.4 years, showing no comorbidities in most of our sample. Mean follow up time was 58 months. The most frequent cutaneous manifestations were ulcers, livedo racemosa, subcutaneous nodules, atrophie blanche lesions and purpuras; with lower limbs involvement in all cases, however other areas were also involved. The main regional symptoms were pain and paresthesia, while systemic complaints were absent in the majority of cases. Mononeuritis multiplex was identified in a quarter of our sample. Most of the laboratory findings were non-specific. There was evidence for previously contact with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 46.1% of cases which were tested for purified protein derivative (PPD test). In our patients the disease course was benign, without complications, and systemic polyarteritis nodosa did not develop in any patient. Conclusions: An extensive work-up including autoimmune laboratory tests, thrombophilic factors and investigation of infectious diseases, specially previous contact with tuberculosis agent should be part of CPAN investigation. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1568997216300362
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that orchestrate the passage of ions across the cell membrane and thus regulate the various key physiological processes of the living system. The stringently regulated expression and function of these channels hold a pivotal role in the development and execution of various cellular functions.Malfunction of these channels result in debilitating diseases collectively termed channelopathies. In this review we highlight the role of these proteins in the immune system with special emphasis on the development of autoimmunity. The role of ion channels in various autoimmune diseases is also listed out. This comprehensive review summarises the ion channels that could be used as molecular targets in the development of new therapeutics against auto immune disorders.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Self-reactive antibodies represent a significant force in autoimmune disease induction. In antibody-dependent autoimmune syndromes such as immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), myasthenia gravis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), autoantibodies exert their inflammatory effect through FcγRs, a well-established class of cell surface receptors that interact with the Fc domain of IgG. Down-regulating FcγR functionality presents an attractive strategy to treat antibody-dependent autoimmune diseases. Various approaches, including nonspecific blocking of the IgG binding site as well as specific targeting using antagonistic monoclonal antibodies, have been explored to modulate the interaction between the Fc portion of IgG and FcγRs. The exquisite specificity and favorable pharmacokinetics of IgG make monoclonal antibodies a preferred choice. Indeed, the first antagonistic monoclonal antibody against the human FcγRIIIA had shown efficacy in refractory ITP patients; however, the practicality of using anti-FcγRIII antibody as a therapeutic was hindered by its associated adverse events, a phenomenon recapitulated in animal models. In this review, we discuss the role of FcγRs in autoimmune diseases, and focus on a novel monovalent approach to target FcγRs to resolve antibody-mediated autoimmunity.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: This review has discussed a link between allergic rhinitis, asthma and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and a case report in this area. A clear link with symptoms of allergic rhinitis, asthma and SLE exists. Several articles found on pubmed in the literature are listed on allergic rhinitis and allergy, Th1-immune responses, mast cells in autoimmunity, total immunoglobulin E levels in lupus, atopic diseases and SLE are reviewed. In addition, risks and correlations, genetic predisposition, environmental factors, immune regulation, elevated serum IgE levels, regulatory B cells for both allergic and autoimmune diseases are mentioned, Asthma and the vascular endothelial cell growth factor, asthma and autoimmune diseases, allergy and autoimmunity, neutrophils, innate and adaptive immunity in the development of SLE, the (Tim) gene family, complement activation in SLE and immunomodulation, hypersensitivity reactions in autoimmunity are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is an autoimmune systemic necrotizing small-vessel vasculitis associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Oto-neurological manifestations of ANCA associated vasculitis according to PR3-ANCA positivity and MPO-ANCA positivity are usually reported. Facial nerve palsy is usually reported during the clinical course of the disease but it might appear as the presenting sign of GPA. Necrotizing vasculitis of the facial nerve 'vasa nervorum' is nowadays the most widely accepted etiopathogenetic theory to explain facial damage in GPA patients A central role for PR3-ANCA in the pathophysiology of vasculitis in GPA patients with oto-neurological manifestation is reported. GPA requires prompt, effective management of the acute and chronic manifestations. Once the diagnosis of GPA has been established, clinicians should devise an appropriate treatment strategy for each individual patient, based on current clinical evidence, treatment guidelines and recommendations.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Axial spondyloarthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with the onset at a young age, and, if undiagnosed and untreated, it may result in permanent damage and lifelong disability. Rates of early diagnosis have improved, due in particular to the addition of magnetic resonance imaging into the diagnostic armamentaria; however, it is costly, not widely available, and requires experienced readers to interpret the findings. In addition to clinical measures and imaging techniques, biomarkers that will be described in this review may represent useful tools for diagnosis, monitoring disease activity and outcomes as well as therapeutic responses. Currently, HLA-B27 remains the best genetic biomarker for making a diagnosis, while CRP currently appears to be the best circulating measure for assessing disease activity, predicting structural progression and therapeutic response. Interestingly, key molecules in the pathogenesis of the disease and essential therapeutic targets, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23, show only limited association with disease characteristics or disease progression. Some genetic biomarkers and particularly anti-CD74 antibodies, may become a promising tool for the early diagnosis of axSpA. Further biomarkers, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-3, calprotectin (S100A8/9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) or dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), are not sufficient to reflect disease activity, but may predict spinal structural progression. In addition, recent data have shown that monitoring calprotectin might represent a valuable biomarker of therapeutic response. However, all of these results need to be confirmed in large cohort studies prior to use in daily clinical practice.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: A link between autoimmune responses and cancer via autoantibodies was first described in the 1950's. Since, autoantibodies have been studied for their potential use as cancer biomarkers, however the exact causes of their production remain to be elucidated. This review summarises current theories of the causes of autoantibody production in cancer namely: 1) defects in tolerance and inflammation, 2) changes in protein expression levels, 3) altered protein structure and 4) cellular death mechanisms. We also highlight the need for further research into this field to improve our understanding of autoantibodies as biomarkers for cancer development and progression.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To date, no studies have yet assessed the characteristics of non-HCV patients with low level of cryoglobulin (≤ 0.05g/L). The aims of the current study were thus to: 1) determine the prevalence of cryoglobulin ≤0.05g/L in patients with non-HCV cryoglobulin; and 2) compare clinical features and long term outcome, including organ complications and mortality rate, between non-HCV patients with cryoglobulin level≤0.05g/L and those exhibiting cryoglobulin level>0.05g/L. Methods: Among 6379 cryoglobulin testing, cryoglobulin was detected in 618 patients (9.69% of cases); of these 618 patients, 453 non-HCV patients were included in the study. The medical records of these patients were reviewed. Results: Of 453 non-HCV cryoglobulin-positive patients, 265 (58.6%) exhibited cryoglobulin level≤0.05g/L. We showed that patients with cryoglobulin level≤0.05g/L had: 1) less commonly: palpable purpura (p<0.001), digital ulcers (p=0.006), peripheral neurologic involvement (p=0.03) and renal impairment (p=0.03); and 2) lower median values of ESR (p<0.001) and C-reactive protein (p=0.001). Patients with cryoglobulin level≤0.05g/L less often experienced infections (p=0.04) and hematological malignancies (p=0.01); both groups did not differ regarding prevalence of connective tissue diseases and solid tumors. Mortality rate was as high as 13.6% in patients with cryoglobulin level≤0.05g/L; death was manly due to: solid tumors (16.6%), cardiovascular complications (13.8%), hematological malignancies (11.1%), infections (8.3%), and pulmonary/renal complications of cryoglobulin (8.3%) and connective tissue diseases (8.3%). Conclusion: Our study shows a high prevalence of cryoglobulin level≤0.05g/L in clinical practice. Our findings further underscore that non-HCV cryoglobulin level≤0.05g/L may be responsible with severe renal and neurological complications, leading to high morbidity and mortality in these patients. Thus, our data suggest that both appropriate therapy and close follow-up may be required to improve such patients' outcome.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare connective tissue disease of unknown etiology characterized by chronic inflammation and fibrosis of the skin, vascular abnormalities and variable involvement of organs including kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, heart and lungs. SSc shows a complex aetiology in which both environmental and genetic factors seems to influence the onset and outcome of the disease. We provide an extensive overview of the genetic factors and epigenetic modifications, and what their knowledge has revealed in terms of etiopathogenesis of SSc.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Autoimmune diseases refer to a spectrum of diseases characterized by an active immune response against the host, which frequently involves increased autoantibody production. The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial and the exploitation of novel effective treatment is urgent. Capsaicin is a nutritional factor, the active component of chili peppers, which is responsible for the pungent component of chili pepper. As a stimuli, capsaicin selectively activate transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1(TRPV1) and exert various biological effects. This review discusses the effect Capsaicin through its receptor on the development and modulation of autoimmune diseases, which may shed light upon potential therapies in capsaicin-targeted approaches.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: There is raising interest in the scientific community about the impact of body mass on different rheumatologic diseases. A growing body of evidence suggests that the effect of obesity on joint structure goes beyond the simply overload, but is based on a complex interwinding of cytokines, hormones, growth factors, intracellular regulators that at different stages can modify the course of a rheumatologic disease and the clinical response to biotherapies. In these settings, psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been the more extensively studied. Intriguing is the finding that the interaction between obesity and diseases seems different for PsA or RA. Concerning PsA, epidemiologic studies have provided robust data about the association between obesity and prevalence of psoriasis or PsA. Yet, obesity is associated with an increase in degree of disability and poor clinical outcome on treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) drugs. Nevertheless, there are clues suggesting that weight reduction above 5% from baseline increases the probability of achieving a good clinical response in PsA patients on anti-TNF drugs. On the contrary, the epidemiological association between obesity and RA seems to be restricted to some categories of patients with peculiar demographic and autoimmune status. Furthermore, obesity definitely impairs the clinical response of RA patients to anti-TNF treatment, and this might be an effect limited to TNF-blocking agents, as preliminary studies are not confirming these findings for abatacept or tocilizumab. However, the most puzzling aspect of the impact of obesity on RA is that obese patients tend to have a more clinical active disease, an impaired response to biotherapies, and a less radiographically evident joint damage over time. The latter is a very stimulating issue and the knowledge of the underlying mechanisms should be an auspicious challenge for the researchers, which will provide further insights on the overall management of RA.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: The structures of epitopes bound by autoantibodies against RNA-protein complexes have been well-defined over several decades, but little is known of the clonality, immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) gene usage and mutational status of the autoantibodies themselves at the level of the secreted (serum) proteome. A novel proteomic workflow is presented based on affinity purification of specific Igs from serum, high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and de novo and database-driven sequencing of V-region proteins by mass spectrometry. Analysis of anti-Ro52/Ro60/La proteomes in primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and anti-Sm and anti-ribosomal P proteomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has revealed that these antibody responses are dominated by restricted sets of public (shared) clonotypes, consistent with common pathways of production across unrelated individuals. The discovery of shared sets of specific V-region peptides can be exploited for diagnostic biomarkers in targeted mass spectrometry platforms and for tracking and removal of pathogenic clones.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews
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    ABSTRACT: IL-17 is involved in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, however its role in vitiligo has not been well defined. Emerging human and mouse studies have demonstrated that systemic, tissue, and cellular levels of IL-17 are elevated in vitiligo. Many studies have also shown significant positive correlations between these levels and disease activity, extent, and severity. Treatments that improve vitiligo, such as ultraviolet B phototherapy, also modulate IL-17 levels. This review synthesizes our current understanding of how IL-17 may influence the pathogenesis of autoimmune vitiligo at the molecular level. This has implications for defining new vitiligo biomarkers and treatments.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Autoimmunity reviews