International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology

Publisher: Elsevier

Current impact factor: 2.88

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.882
2013 Impact Factor 2.648
2012 Impact Factor 2.036
2011 Impact Factor 2.144
2010 Impact Factor 2.378
2009 Impact Factor 3.045
2008 Impact Factor 2.264
2007 Impact Factor 2.205
2006 Impact Factor 2.247
2005 Impact Factor 2.584
2004 Impact Factor 1.563
2003 Impact Factor 2.014
2002 Impact Factor 2.055
2001 Impact Factor 1.747
2000 Impact Factor 1.489
1999 Impact Factor 1.829
1998 Impact Factor 1.148
1997 Impact Factor 0.703
1996 Impact Factor 1.089
1995 Impact Factor 0.585
1994 Impact Factor 0.875
1993 Impact Factor 0.684
1992 Impact Factor 0.87

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.92
Cited half-life 7.90
Immediacy index 0.50
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.91
ISSN 1872-7697

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors pre-print on any website, including arXiv and RePEC
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Author's post-print may be used to update arXiv and RepEC
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Author's post-print must be released with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/06/2015
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recent research suggests that sustained attention is punctuated by periodic lapses that produce cyclic variations in sustained human performance. Research conducted by our laboratory (Arruda, Zhang, Amoss, Coburn, & Aue, 2009) and by the laboratories of others (Aue, Arruda, Kass, & Stanny, 2009; Smith, Valentino, & Arruda, 2003) suggests that sustained human performance cycles approximately every 1.5 and 5.2 min. Further, it has been suggested that a norepinephrine based arousal system may be responsible for these variations. Unfortunately, both cholinergic and noradrenergic pathways are known to mediate attention and it is unclear from previous research whether one or both of the identified cycles is related to cholinergic functioning. Consequently, the purpose of the present investigation was to assess the validity of the 1.5 and the 5.2 min cycles using both reaction time and a cortical marker of cholinergic activity—the flash visual evoked potential P2 (FVEP-P2). Twenty-seven participants performed a 15-min continuous performance task. A spectral analysis procedure was used to detect the prevalence of the 1.5 and 5.2 min cycles in both performance and cortical activity. While the results of these analyses support the validity of the 1.5 and 5.2 min cycles in sustained human performance, only the 5.2 min cycle was detected in cortical activity (i.e., the FVEP-P2 amplitudes) using model fitting. Consequently, the results of the present investigation support the validity of the 1.5 and 5.2 min cycles and extend the findings of previous research by implicating acetylcholine in the 5.2 min cycle.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the present study was to investigate age-related effects on functional brain networks during a mental rotation task. At behavioral level age-related cognitive deficits have been shown. Cognitive deficits in older adults are associated with structural decline, especially in frontal and parietal areas and in the corpus callosum. In consequence, functional networks are affected by old age as well. To this end, a graph theoretical approach was taken, which quantifies the global and local efficiency as well as the cost efficiency of frontal and parietal intrahemispheric and interhemispheric networks. Main results indicate that intrahemispheric and interhemispheric networks are differently affected by older age: in the left frontal and the left and right parietal intrahemispheric networks global and local efficiency was reduced, whereas in frontal and parietal interhemispheric networks cost efficiency was decreased.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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    ABSTRACT: Slow waves are characteristic waveforms that occur during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep that play an integral role in sleep quality and brain plasticity. Benzodiazepines are commonly used medications that alter slow waves, however, their effects may depend on the time of night and measure used to characterize slow waves. Prior investigations have utilized minimal scalp derivations to evaluate the effects of benzodiazepines on slow waves, and thus the topography of changes to slow waves induced by benzodiazepines has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to evaluate the effects of oral temazepam on slow wave activity, incidence, and morphology during NREM sleep in 18 healthy adults relative to placebo. Temazepam was associated with significant decreases in slow wave activity and incidence, which were most prominent in the latter portions of the sleep period. However, temazepam was also associated with a decrease in the magnitude of high-amplitude slow waves and their slopes in the first NREM sleep episode, which was most prominent in frontal derivations. These findings suggest that benzodiazepines produce changes in slow waves throughout the night that vary depending on cortical topography and measures used to characterize slow waves. Further research that explores the relationships between benzodiazepine-induced changes to slow waves and the functional effects of these waveforms is indicated.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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    ABSTRACT: Recent investigations of the neural correlates of affect elicited from different modalities has found both modality-general and modality-specific representations (Chikazoe et al., 2014). The implications for how physiological responses to affect differ across stimulus modalities has not been fully investigated. This study examined similarities and differences between physiological signatures of affect derived from two different modes of presentation: visual pictures and auditory music sampled from an affective space defined by valence and arousal. Electromyography recordings for the zygomaticus major (EMGZ) and corrugator supercilii (EMGC) were measured along with heart rate and skin conductance level (SCL). Multidimensional scaling was used to visualize relationships from physiological and behavioral responses, and the observed relationships were statistically evaluated using multivariate and univariate analyses. Results for physiological measures demonstrated that valence was represented in the same general way across modalities, primarily reflected in EMGC responses. Arousal, however, was represented in a modality-specific manner, with SCL and EMGZ sensitive to music-based arousal but not picture-based arousal. Stimulus modality itself was predicted from EMGC. Thus, physiological responses to valence were similar across modalities but physiological responses to arousal differed across modalities. These results support the utility of testing for affective markers across modalities within the same experimental setting to reveal how physiological responses are linked to either affect, stimulus modality or both.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined whether or not a cooperative context is a determinant of the social influence on the evaluation of two action outcomes: a monetary outcome and a conflict of opinion with other group members. In the present study, three-person groups were randomly assigned to be either a cooperative or individual group and asked to perform a gambling task. The monetary outcomes in the cooperative group were interrelated among group members, whereas those in the individual group did not influence each other. The present results showed that monetary outcomes elicited feedback-related negativity (FRN) and a conflict of opinion with other group members elicited FRN-like negativity, which reflect an evaluation of the motivational significance of action outcomes. The FRN elicited by monetary outcomes was reduced when participants shared decisions with other group members only in the cooperative group, indicating that the cooperative context reduced the motivational significance of monetary outcomes through the diffusion of responsibility. The FRN-like negativity elicited by a conflict of opinion showed a different pattern between the cooperative and individual groups, indicating that the cooperative context can influence the evaluation of a conflict of opinion, possibly via the modulation of group cohesiveness or conflict processing. The present results suggest that a cooperative context, rather than the social setting, is a determinant of the social influence on outcome evaluation.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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    ABSTRACT: The current study investigated whether motivational dysfunction in Parkinson's patients is related to a deficit in preparing for motivated behavior. Based on previous studies, it was hypothesized that PD patients would show reduced preparation for action specifically when faced with threat (of loss) and that reduced action preparation would relate to self-report of apathy symptoms. The study measured an electrocortical correlate of preparation for action (CNV amplitude) in PD patients and healthy controls, as well as defensive and appetitive activation during emotional perception (LPP amplitude). The sample included 18 non-demented PD patients (tested on dopaminergic medications) and 15 healthy controls who responded as quickly as possible to cues signaling threat of loss or reward, in which the speed of the response determined the outcome. Results indicated that, whereas PD patients showed similar enhanced action preparation with the addition of incentives to controls, PD patients showed generally reduced action preparation, evidenced by reduced CNV amplitude overall. Results suggest that PD patients may have behavioral issues due to globally impaired action preparation but that this deficit is not emotion-specific, and movement preparation may be aided by incentive in PD patients.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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    ABSTRACT: A rapid neural adaptation procedure and Event Related Potentials (ERPs) were employed to study individual differences in Good and Bad recognizers in face perception. The major goal was to characterize the sensitivity of the P100 and the N170 to the identity repetition effect as a function of inter-individual perceptual abilities. For these purposes an integrated methodological approach was used in which a self-report, a standardized test and behavioral performances were combined with ERPs measures. Specifically, two groups of face recognizers (Good and Bad recognizers) were selected by means of a self-report questionnaire on face recognition abilities (The Italian Face Abilities Questionnaire) and the scoring at the Cambridge Face Memory Test. The P100 showed an early neural tuning for faces in Good recognizers. The N170 triggered by the adaptor showed face specificity compared to cars but, importantly, only Good recognizers showed a decreased amplitude of N170 for test faces of the same identity compared to test faces of different identity while this was not the case for Bad recognizers. These results show that ERPs are a suitable and sensitive tool to tap individual differences in face recognition. In conclusion, our results show the importance of considering inter-individual different perceptual abilities in face processing research.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Pain induced by electrical stimuli has been found in previous research to be reduced by brief, weak electrical pulses, termed prepulses, presented 40 to 60ms prior to the painful electrical stimulus. Methods: The present experiment investigated the generality of this effect by presenting weak acoustic stimuli simultaneously with, or 80 or 1000ms prior to, painful electric shocks. In the second half of the experimental session, each participant (N=119) was told that the acoustic stimuli would either increase or decrease the pain induced by the electric shock, to investigate automatic and controlled cognitive processes in the modulation of pain. Results: Acoustic stimuli presented simultaneously with painful stimulation increased pain slightly (four mm on a 100mm scale). Acoustic stimuli presented 80 and 1000ms prior to painful stimuli had no effect on pain. Information that acoustic stimuli would increase pain did so in females, but only when the acoustic stimulus was presented 80ms prior to the painful stimulus. Conclusions: The effect of the acoustic stimuli and of information was weak. Failure to replicate previous findings of decreased pain by weak prepulses was most likely due to the sensory modality of the prepulse stimuli. It is recommended that further studies of pain modulation by brief stimulation use electrical and not acoustic prepulse stimuli.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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    ABSTRACT: The modulatory effects of low and high spatial frequencies on the posterior C1, P1 and N1 event-related potential (ERP) amplitudes have long been known from previous electrophysiological studies. There is also evidence that categorization of complex natural images relies on top-down processes, probably by facilitating contextual associations during the recognition process. However, to our knowledge, no study has investigated so far how such top-down effects are manifested in scalp ERPs, when presenting natural images with attenuated low or high spatial frequency information. Twenty-one healthy subjects participated in an animal vs. vehicle categorization task with intact grayscale stimuli and images predominantly containing high (HSF) or low spatial frequencies (LSF). ERP scalp maps and amplitudes/latencies measured above occipital, parietal and frontocentral sites were compared among the three stimulus conditions. Although early occipital components (C1 and P1) were modulated by spatial frequencies, the time range of the N1 was the earliest to show top-down effects for images with unmodified low spatial frequency spectrum (intact and LSF stimuli). This manifested in ERP amplitude changes spreading to anterior scalp sites and shorter posterior N1 latencies. Finally, the frontocentral N350 and the centroparietal LPC were differently influenced by spatial frequency filtering, with the LPC being the only component to show an amplitude and latency modulation congruent with the behavioral responses (sensitivity index and reaction times). Our results strengthen the coarse-to-fine model of object recognition and provide electrophysiological evidence for low spatial frequency-based top-down effects within the first 200ms of visual processing.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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    ABSTRACT: The current exploratory research examined whether high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) modulates the association between anxiety and (1) executive attentional control during situations involving neutral stimuli, in which the distractor stimuli are in conflict with the target stimulus, and (2) risk aversion in decision making. Forty-five participants (21 with low and 24 with high trait-anxiety) performed a modified version of the Attention Network Test to measure attentional control, and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task to measure risk aversion. HF-HRV was recorded during a rest period before completion of the tasks. Results showed that individuals with high anxiety and low HF-HRV have worse attentional control in the face of conflicting information as well as greater risk aversion, in comparison with individuals with both high anxiety and high HF-HRV or low anxiety (regardless of HF-HRV). HF-HRV was positively associated with attentional control and negatively associated with risk aversion. Furthermore, a strong negative association was observed between attentional control and risk aversion. These results suggest that HF-HRV modulates the influence of anxiety on both attentional control to neutral stimuli, and risk aversion in decision making. Greater HF-HRV appears to fulfill a protective role in highly anxious individuals. The associations observed also suggest that executive control of attention plays a relevant role in decision making. These results support the relevance of the autonomic nervous system in sustained cognition and are in accordance with theories in which vagal-mediated heart rate variability is taken as an indicator of prefrontal cortex inhibitory influences.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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    ABSTRACT: Prior research has provided evidence that in children sleep and behavior are related. We aimed to determine the association between naturalistic daily variations in sleep and behavioral functioning. African American children, 5.4±1.7years old, living on the south side of Chicago participated in a repeated measures study to assess this sleep-behavior link. Data was obtained from three separate two-week periods of 24-hour actigraphy and the parental version of the Behavioral Assessment System for Children. Canonical correlations analyses were applied to investigate the relation between individual changes in sleep and behavior. After 1-month, weekday average sleep duration primarily related to internalizing behaviors, while within-child variability of sleep related to behavioral changes which may involve internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Week-weekend differences in sleep associated with maladaptive social skills. Over a 6-week period, sleep onset latency and sleep offset latency related to behavioral symptoms and maladaptive skills. Over a period of 3-months, sleep associated with symptomatic behaviors while the adverse impact of within-child variability of sleep attenuated. Alternatively, the week-weekend differences in bedtime, wake-up time, wake after sleep onset and sleep onset latency in particular related to internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Findings showed that poor sleep related to dysfunctional behaviors. While maladaptive at the beginning, they may develop into symptomatic behaviors with potentially internalizing characteristics. As time goes on, individual changes in sleep onset and offset might be important clinical markers of a chronic 'social dysregulation'. Continued sufficient and regular sleep may improve daytime and nighttime behavioral regulation in early childhood.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International journal of psychophysiology: official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology