Journal of ethnopharmacology

Publisher: Elsevier

Current impact factor: 3.00

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.998
2013 Impact Factor 2.939
2012 Impact Factor 2.755
2011 Impact Factor 3.014
2010 Impact Factor 2.466
2009 Impact Factor 2.322
2008 Impact Factor 2.26
2007 Impact Factor 2.049
2006 Impact Factor 1.625
2005 Impact Factor 1.554
2004 Impact Factor 1.42
2003 Impact Factor 1.269
2002 Impact Factor 1.188
2001 Impact Factor 0.78
2000 Impact Factor 0.575
1999 Impact Factor 0.687
1998 Impact Factor 0.522
1997 Impact Factor 0.578
1996 Impact Factor 0.562
1995 Impact Factor 0.366
1994 Impact Factor 0.5
1993 Impact Factor 0.507
1992 Impact Factor 0.272

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.26
Cited half-life 7.20
Immediacy index 0.50
Eigenfactor 0.03
Article influence 0.58
ISSN 1872-7573

Publisher details

Elsevier

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    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/06/2015
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: Aloe barbadensis Mill. (Aloe vera) is a widely used medicinal plant well reputed for its diverse therapeutic applications. It has been used for thousands of years in folk medicine to treat various conditions and the Aloe vera gel has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory as well as immunostimulatory and immunomodulatory properties. However, the mode of action is still unclear. Aim of the study: The aim of this study was determine the effects of two well-defined Aloe barbadensis Mill. extracts AVH200(®) and AVE200 on human blood T cells in vitro. Materials and methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors were stimulated polyclonally in the presence or absence of AVH200(®) and AVE200. The T cell phenotype was investigated by flow cytometry, cell proliferation was determined by CFSE dye and thymidine assay, respectively and cytokine secretion was determined by MSD(®) Multi-Spot Assay system and ELISA. Results: The presence of AVH200(®) resulted in a reduced expression of CD25 among CD3(+) T cells and suppression of T cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, AVH200(®) reduced the expression of CD28 on CD3(+) T cells. AVH200(®) also reduced the secretion of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17A in PBMC cultures. The AVH200(®) dose dependent reduction in T cell activation and proliferation recorded in the cell cultures was not due to apoptosis or cell death. Additionally, AVH200(®) was found to be more effective as compared to AVE200 in reducing T cell activation and proliferation. Conclusion: AVH200(®) has the potential to reduce the activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion of healthy human blood T cells. Our study suggests that AVH200(®) has a suppressive effect on human blood T cells in vitro.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: The genus Boerhavia is widely distributed in tropical, subtropical and temperate regions of the world including Mexico, America, Africa, Asia, Indian Ocean Islands, Pacific Islands and Australia. The genus Boerhavia is extensively used by local peoples and medicinal practitioners for treatments of hepatitis, urinary disorders, gastro intestinal diseases, inflammations, skin problems, infectious diseases and asthma. Present review focused on traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of Boerhavia genus to support potential scope for advance ethnopharmacological study. Materials and methods: Information on the Boerhavia species was collected from classical books on medicinal plants, pharmacopoeias and scientific databases like PubMed, Scopus, GoogleScholar, Web of Science and others. Also scientific literatures based on ethnomedicinal surveys, Ph.D. and M.Sc. dissertations, published papers from Elsevier, Taylor and Francis, Springer, ACS as well as Wiley publishers and reports by government bodies and documentations were assessed. Results: A total of 180 compounds from Boerhavia genus were isolated of which B. diffusa alone shared around 131 compounds and for most of which it is currently an exclusive source. In the genus, phenolic glycosides and flavonoids contribute approximately 97 compounds. These includes eupalitin, rotenoids like boeravinones, coccineons, alkaloid i.e. betanin and punarnavine etc., showing vital pharmaceutical activities such as anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunomodulatory. Conclusion: Boerhavia is an important genus with wide range of medicinal uses. However, most of the available scientific literatures have lacked relevant doses, duration and positive controls for examining bioefficacy of extracts and its active compounds. In some studies, taxonomic errors were encountered. Moreover, there is need for accurate methods in testing the safety and ethnomedicinal validity of Boerhavia species.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: Cataract is the clouding or opacity that develops in the eye's lens and is considered to be an unavoidable consequence of aging due to irreversible lens damage. Free radicals and oxidant species are reported to be the major factor responsible for the onset and pathology of cataract. No pharmacological measures are formulated to treat cataract blindness and surgical removal of the opaque lens is the only remedy till date. Boosting of antioxidant potential of the lens is proved to prevent cataract and many indigenous plants have been screened for anticataractogenic potential in the last decades. The objective of the present study was to determine whether Cassia tora leaves; the plant employed in traditional medicine for eye rejuvenation and ailments, can prevent cataract in neonatal rats. Materials and methods: Cataract was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite at a dose of 4μg/g body weight on the 10(th) day and Cassia tora leaves was administered orally from 8(th) day upto 12(th) day at a concentration of 5μg/g body weight. After 30 days; Lens morphology, oxidant-antioxidant equilibrium, glutathione metabolism, cytoskeletal protein/gene expressions were monitored. Results: Lens morphology, biochemical analysis and expression studies supported the anticataractogenic effect of Cassia tora leaves. Conclusion: In summary, it can be suggested that the consumption of these leaves afford protection to the lens with its antioxidant action and seems to be a new therapeutic approach against cataract by preventive protection.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Korean red ginseng (ginseng, Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is a famous traditional drug used in Korea for the treatment and prevention of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and liver and cardiovascular diseases. Menopause is strongly associated with many of the aforementioned metabolic diseases and increased visceral obesity. The aims of this study were to investigate whether ginseng inhibits obesity and related disorders in ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6J mice, which is a mouse model of postmenopausal women, and to determine the mechanism of action involved in this process.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) has been used traditionally and contemporarily as an anti-stress herb. Current hypotheses suggest that not only chronic stress promotes angiogenesis, but angiogenesis also modulates adipogenesis and obesity. Because the herbal extract ALS-L1023 from Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) has an anti-angiogenic activity, we hypothesized that ALS-L1023 could inhibit adipogenesis and adipocyte hypertrophy. Materials and methods: ALS-L1023 was prepared by a two-step organic solvent fractionation from Melissa officinalis. The effects of ALS-L1023 on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and adipocyte hypertrophy in high fat diet (HFD)-fed obese mice were measured using in vivo and in vitro approaches. Results: ALS-L1023 inhibited angiogenesis in a dose-dependent manner in the HUVEC tube formation assay in vitro. Treatment of cells with ALS-L1023 inhibited lipid accumulation and adipocyte-specific gene expression caused by troglitazone or MDI differentiation mix. ALS-L1023 reduced mRNA expression of angiogenic factors (VEGF-A and FGF-2) and MMPs (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in differentiated cells. In contrast, mRNA levels of angiogenic inhibitors (TSP-1, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2) increased. Protease activity, as measured by zymography, showed that activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 decreased in ALS-L1023-treated cells. ALS-L1023 also inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 reporter gene expression in the presence of the MMP inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. An in vivo study showed that ALS-L1023 not only decreased adipose tissue mass and adipocyte size, but also reduced mRNA levels of adipose tissue angiogenic factors and MMPs in HFD-fed obese mice. Conclusions: These results suggest that the anti-angiogenic herbal extract ALS-L1023 suppresses adipogenesis and adipocyte hypertrophy, and this effect may be mediated by inhibiting angiogenesis and MMP activities. Thus, by curbing adipogenesis, anti-angiogenic ALS-L1023 yields a possible therapeutic choice for the prevention and treatment of human obesity and its associated conditions.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Erlong Zuoci decoction (ELZCD), a typical traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription, has long been clinically used in treatment of deafness and tinnitus with the syndrome of “kidney yin deficiency”. However, there are few studies to investigate its pharmacological mechanisms. Until now, there is not report about its effects on the age-related hearing loss (ARHL).
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: Ophiopogonis Radix (Maidong in Chinese), the root of Ophiopogon japonicus, is widely used in local medicines of China, Japan and some south-eastern Asian countries. According to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) principle, Ophiopogonis Radix nourishes the yin, promotes body fluid production, moistens the lung, eases the mind and clears away heart fire. This review summarizes the achievements of the investigations in botany, phytochemistry, quality control, traditional uses, pharmacological activities and clinical studies on O. japonicus; this review also describes the shortcomings of studies on this herbal drug and thus serves as the basis of further scientific research and development of this traditional herbal drug. Materials and methods: O. japonicus-related information was collected from various resources, including books on Chinese herbs and the Internet databases, such as Google Scholar, SciFinder, Web of Science, Elsevier, ACS, PubMed and China Knowledge Resource Integrated (CNKI). Results: O. japonicus is widely distributed in East Asia, especially in China. Numerous compounds were identified from this plant. The main components of O. japonicus include steroidal saponins, homoisoflavonoids and polysaccharides, which exhibited various pharmacological activities, such as cardiovascular protection, anti-inflammation, anticancer, anti-oxidation, immunomodulation, cough relief, antimicrobial, and anti-diabetes. Conclusions: O. japonicus is a common traditional Chinese herbal drug used as the main ingredient in many prescriptions. Modern researches verified that O. japonicus can be used either as a healthy food or a therapeutic agent for disease prevention and treatment. The molecular mechanisms and chemical principles of this herbal medicine should be further explored.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: Pearl and nacre are valuable traditional medicines to treat palpitations, convulsions or epilepsy in China for thousands of years. However, the active ingredients are not clear till now. Aim of the study: The main purpose of the current investigation was to assess the anticonvulsant and sedative-hypnotic activity of pearl powder and nacre powder, including their corresponding 6 protein extracts. Material and methods: Determination of the amino acid composition of the obtained protein was carried out by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) combined with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) pre-column derivatisation. The influence of the tested drugs on locomotor activity and convulsions latency was recorded. The contents of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in brain were detected by enzyme-linked immunesorbent assay (ELISA) kits. In addition, immunohistochemistry was carried out to evaluate the changes of 5-HT3 and GABAB. In parallel, the expressions of them were demonstrated by western blot. Results: The obtained data suggested that pearl original powder (1.1g/kg), pearl water-soluble protein (0.2g/kg), pearl acid-soluble protein (0.275g/kg), pearl conchiolin protein (1.1g/kg), nacre original powder (1.1g/kg), nacre water-soluble protein (0.2g/kg), nacre acid-soluble protein (0.7g/kg) and nacre conchiolin protein (1.1g/kg) could down-regulate the expression of 5-HT3 and up-regulate the level of GABAB to varying degrees compared with the control group. Besides, drug administration also reduced the locomotor activity and increased convulsions latency with a certain mortality. Conclusions: These findings correlated with the traditional use of pearl and nacre as sedation and tranquilization agents, thus making them interesting sources for further drug development and also providing critical important evidence for the selection of quality control markers.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: This prospective, randomized, double-blinded, double-dummy, multicenter study compared the efficacy and safety of PG201 (Layla®), a new product from extracts of 12 plant sources and SKI306X (Joins®) which have been well investigated and in relatively wide usage among herbal medicine, for the treatment of patients with knee osteoarthritis.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: There are more than 3000 officially documented plants in the Indian subcontinent that hold great medicinal potential. One such under-explored plant is an evergreen tropical tree Neolamarckia cadamba (Roxb.) Bosser (Rubiaceae). It is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of the world and has therapeutic potential against many diseases such as diabetes, anaemia, stomatitis, leprosy, cancer and infectious diseases. Neolamarckia cadamba has historical existence in India and it is mentioned in mythical stories. There are several reports on medicinal values of root, bark and leaves of N. cadamba; but the literature on its fruits is scanty. Therefore, the present review aims to provide updated comprehensive information on the phytochemistry and pharmacological properties of different parts of N. cadamba tree with special reference to its fruit, in order to open new perspectives for future food and pharmacological research. Materials and methods: A literature search was performed on N. cadamba using ethnobotanical textbooks, published articles in peer-reviewed journals, unpublished materials, government survey reports and scientific databases such as Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science, Science Direct, Google Scholar and other web search engines (Google, Yahoo). The Plant List, International Plant Name Index and Kew Botanical Garden Plant name databases were used to validate the scientific names. Results and discussion: Neolamarckia cadamba is one of the economically important trees, which is being exploited for paper, pulp and wood industry. In folk medicine, various parts of N. cadamba are used in the treatment of various ailments such as fever, uterine complaints, blood diseases, skin diseases, tumor, anaemia, eye inflammation and diarrhoea. Other reported uses of N. cadamba include antihepatotoxic, antimalarial, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, diuretic and laxative. Various phytochemicals such as cadambine and its derivatives (dihydrocadambine and isodihydrocadambine) and indole alkaloids (Neolamarckines) were isolated from the leaves; whereas the presence of quinovic acid derivatives have been reported in the bark of N. cadamba. Conclusion: The present review compiles information on an ethnopharmacologically useful plant N. cadamba. Bioactive compounds responsible for its various medicinal properties and their effects at the molecular level need to be investigated in more detail. Furthermore, the detailed study of toxicity and pharmacological properties of extracts as well as molecules in N. cadamba is required to confirm the ethnomedicinal claims of N. cadamba for food and pharmaceutical applications.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: The genus Litsea is one of the most diverse genera of evergreen trees or shrubs belong to Lauraceae, and comprises roughly 400 species of tree that are distributed abundantly throughout tropical and subtropical Asia, North and South America. Litsea species have been used globally in traditional medicine for the treatment of various diseases including influenza, stomach aches, diarrhea, diabetes, vomiting, bone pain, inflammation, illness related to the central nervous system and other ailments. The purpose of this review is to provide updated, comprehensive and categorized information on the ethnobotany, phytochemistry and pharmacological research of Litsea species in order to explore their therapeutic potential and evaluate future research opportunities. Materials and methods: All the available information on Litsea species was actualised by systematically searching the scientific literatures including Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Indian, and South American herbal classics, library catalogs and scientific databases (PubMed, SciFinder, Web of Science, Google Scholar, VIP and Wanfang). The Plant List, International Plant Name index and Scientific Database of China Plant Species were used to validate scientific names. Results: 407 secondary metabolites have been reported from Litsea species. Litsea Species are sources of secondary metabolites with interesting chemical structures (alkaloids, lactones, sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, lignans, and essential oils) and significant bioactivities. Crude extracts, fractions and phytochemical constituents isolated from Litsea show a wide spectrum of in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activities including anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antidiabetic, anti-HIV, insecticidal, etc. Conclusions: From data collected in this review, the genus Litsea comprises a wide range of therapeutically promising and valuable plants, and has attracted much attention owing to its multiple functions. Many traditional uses of Litsea species have now been validated by modern pharmacology research. Deep and systematic phytochemical investigation of the genus Litsea and the pharmacological properties, especially its mechanism of action and toxicology, to illustrate its ethnomedicinal use, explore the therapeutic potential and support further health-care product development will undoubtedly be the focus of further research. Therefore, detailed and extensive studies and clinical evaluation of Litsea species should be carried out in future for the safety approval of therapeutic applications.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relavance: The decoction of Carica papaya Linn. leaves is used in folklore medicine in certain parts of Malaysia and Indonesia for the treatment of different types of thrombocytopenia associated with diseases and drugs. There are several scientific studies carried out on humans and animal models to confirm the efficacy of decoction of papaya leave for the treatment of disease induced and drug induced thrombocytopenia, however very little is known about the bio-active compounds responsible for the observed activity. The aim of present study was to identify the active phytochemical component of Carica papaya Linn. leaves decoction responsible for anti-thrombocytopenic activity in busulfan-induced thrombocytopenic rats. Materials and methods: Antithrombocytopenic activity was assessed on busulfan induced thrombocytopenic Wistar rats. The antithrombocytopenic activity of different bio-guided fractions was evaluated by monitoring blood platelet count. Bioactive compound carpaine was isolated and purified by chromatographic methods and confirmed by spectroscopic methods (LC-MS and 1D/2d-1H/13C-NMR) and the structure was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Quantification of carpaine was carried out by LC-MS/MS equipped with XTerra(®) MS C18 column and ESI-MS detector using 90:10 CH3CN:CH3COONH4 (6mM) under isocratic conditions and detected with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in positive ion mode. Results: Two different phytochemical groups were isolated from decoction of Carica papaya leaves: phenolics, and alkaloids. Out of these, only alkaloid fraction showed good biological activity. Carpaine was isolated from the alkaloid fraction and exhibited potent activity in sustaining platelet counts upto 555.50±85.17×10(9) /L with no acute toxicity. Conclusions: This study scientifically validates the popular usage of decoction of Carica papaya leaves and it also proves that alkaloids particularly carpaine present in the leaves to be responsible for the antithrombocytopenic activity.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Tongxinluo (TXL), a compound prescription, is formulated according to the collateral disease doctrine of traditional Chinese medicine, and is widely used for the treatment of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in China.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: Herb compatibility is one of the most important characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Rather than being used singly, Chinese herbs are often used in formulae to obtain synergistic effects or to diminish possible adverse reactions. Herb pair, the most fundamental and simplest form of multi-herb formulae, is a centralized representative of herb compatibility. Danggui (Angelicae Sinensis Radix), a widely used Chinese medicine, is usually combined with another herb to treat women's diseases in the clinic. A series of herb pairs containing Danggui have gradually become a focus of modern research, and they exhibit encouraging prospects for development. Materials and methods: A systematic search for studies related to herb pairs containing Danggui was performed via a library search (books, theses, reports, newspapers, magazines, and conference proceedings) and an electronic search (Web of Science, PubMed, and Google Scholar). These sources were scrutinized for information on Danggui herb pairs. Results: Based on a previous statistical analysis, a database containing 16,529 formulae of Danggui from the "Dictionary of Traditional Chinese Medicine Formulae" was reviewed. The results showed a high frequency of compatibility between Danggui and other 22 herbs. The most common ratio among these chosen herb pairs was 1:1, and a majority of the pairs were applied for the treatment of diseases in internal medicine. The present paper reviews ethnopharmacology and advances in variations of the bio-active components and compatibility effects of the herb pairs containing Danggui, especially Danggui-Huangqi, Danggui-Chuanxiong, and Danggui-Shaoyao, which are used at high frequency. It was also observed that there were fewer studies of Danggui-Fuzi, Danggui-Huanglian, Danggui-Gancao, Danggui-Fangfeng and Danggui-Ganjiang, although they have been recorded in classical books as commonly used herb pairs. Moreover, some herb pairs such as Danggui-Niuxi and Danggui-Chaihu have been used at high frequency according to the statistical analysis, however, they were not recognized as herb pairs in many relevant books. Conclusions: Recently, several TCM researchers have become interested in investigating the bio-active constituents and compatibility effects of herb pairs. Thus, some methods for in-depth study of herb pairs are essential to be established. The in vitro or in vivo bio-active constituents of herb pairs may differ from those of the single herbs. Additionally, comparative methods should be applied to study not only the bio-active constituents but also the effects of herb pairs. Study of component compatibility may be considered when the bio-active constituents and effects of an herb pair have been definitively demonstrated. Overall, the goal of our basic study of herb pairs should be their clinical application and the development of new drugs.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnobotanical knowledge and traditional medicinal practices from different parts of the world are of global importance and documentation of ethnobotanical, and ethnopharmacological data is a key prerequisite for further research in the area of herbal medicine and its implementation in clinical practice.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: Tongxinluo (TXL), a widely used traditional Chinese medicine, has been proved multiple therapeutic effects in cerebral ischemic infraction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of TXL on the brain edema and post-ischemic inflammatory response. Materials and methods: Middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat was used as the ischemia model. Rats were treated with TXL. In the first stage, the best dosage was chosen based on functional assessment and infarct size. In the second stage, rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: sham control (sham), ischemia and reperfusion (IR) 24h, TXL24h, I/R72h, TXL72h. TXL(1.6g/kg/day) administration was pre-performed for 3 days in TXL groups, and was post-performed for 24 h (TXL24h group) or 72h (TXL72h group). Brain edema was measured by water content, MRI and AQP4 expression. Iba1, HMGB1, TLR4, NF-κB expression were examined by immunofluorescence staining or Western blot. TNF-α was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: High dose (1.6g/kg/day) of TXL remarkably reduced neurological deficit scores and cerebral infarct area. Compared with those results of I/R24h group, pre-post treatment with TXL for 3 days decreased brain water content, down-regulated AQP4 expression, lowered relative signal intensity of T2WI, reduced lesion volume ratio, and inhibited the activation of microglia, HMGB1, TLR4, NF-κB and TNF-α. Conclusions: These results indicated that the TXL pre-post treatment for 3 days could be an effective therapy for brain ischemia by inhibiting the development of brain edema and post-ischemic inflammation.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Ethnopharmacological relevance: Considerable medicinal plant research in Brazil has focused on indigenous and mixed-race (caboclo and caiçara) communities, but relatively few studies have examined the medicinal plants and associated healing traditions of the descendants of enslaved Africans. This study surveyed the medicinal plants employed by a relatively isolated maroon community of Afro-Brazilians in the Atlantic coastal rainforests of Bahia, Brazil, a global biodiversity hotspot. The studied community is exceptional in that the residents were defacto slaves until several years ago, with no access to western medicine. We examined the following questions: 1) What medicinal plants are used in this community? 2) What are the principal taxonomic groups, life forms, source habitats, and geographical origins? 3) What species stand out as measured by use value and frequency indices? and 4) Is the community's geographical isolation and African ancestry reflected in their medicinal uses of the local flora? Materials and methods: The study was carried out in the Quilombo Salamina Putumuju maroon community in Bahia, Brazil. Data were collected from May to October 2014 from 74 individuals (37 men and 37 women) by means of semi-structured interviews, walk in the woods, and vouchering of identified species. We used the Cultural Value Index (CV), the Relative Frequency Index (RF), and the Use Value Index (UV) to determine the importance of medicinal plant resources. Continuity of African medicinal plant uses and traditions was determined through self-reporting and comparison with previously published works. Results: We recorded 118 medicinal plant species distributed in 100 genera and 51 families. The best represented families were: Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae and Myrtaceae. Most plant medicines were used to treat respiratory, digestive systems, genitourinary, and skin problems. The most common medicinal life form was herbs (44%), followed by trees (28%) and shrubs (18%). Native species (55%) were used somewhat more than exotic species (45%), and non-cultivated species (51%) were slightly more numerous than cultivated species (49%). In spite of abundant nearby old-growth forests, trails and gardens were the most common collection sites. A mean of 13.2 medicinal plant species were cited per participant. The highest CV was recorded for Cymbopogon citratus (0.20) followed by Lippia alba (0.19) and Stryphnodendron cf. adstringens (0.17). The highest RF included C. citratus (0.69), L. alba (0.59), and Eugenia uniflora (0.55). The highest UV figures were recorded for S. cf. adstringens (1.68), followed by Sida cf. cordifolia (0.97) and C. citratus (0.93).Fifteen species (13%) of this maroon medicinal flora trace their ancestry to Africa or African-derived healing traditions. Conclusion: The Salamina maroon community maintains considerable knowledge of the medicinal value of the local flora. However, little of this knowledge is derived from the surrounding old-growth tropical forests. Their pharmacopoeia is a hybrid mix of wild and cultivated species, natives and exotics. Among those species representing the community's isolation and African ancestry, most are associated with spiritual and magical medicine.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of ethnopharmacology