Applied Research in Quality of Life

Publisher: International Society for Quality of Life Studies, Springer Verlag

Current impact factor: 0.82

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5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life -
Immediacy index 0.04
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Other titles Applied Research in Quality of Life (Online)
ISSN 1871-2584
OCLC 71122981
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

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  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this study, we examine the behavioral intentions of the elderly, with regard to experiencing virtual reality leisure activities, and propose a new experience model with experience value as a mediating variable. We gathered 294 effective samples consisting of elderly people. Each elderly respondent experienced the activities for ten weeks. The results show that experience value is not only able to effectively predict behavioral intentions (including purchases and ongoing participation), but it is also a mediating variable in the relationship between experience quality and behavioral intentions. These findings fully confirm the importance of “giving consumers a satisfaction experience” advocated in the literature on the experience economy. The present study also shows that experience seeking and experience quality both have a significant positive relationship with experience value, and that experience value in turn influences behavioral intentions, providing empirical support for the conceptualization of virtual reality leisure activity for elderly people.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: There is an abundance of research demonstrating the benefits associated with having a sense of purpose in life, but much of this work utilizes academic (high school or college students) or well-educated adult samples. This study compared adults who graduated from college to adults with no or some college experience on a number of dimensions related to purpose development, including: the process of exploration (purpose pathway), overall level of purpose, and the content of one’s purpose (purpose orientation). The relationship between purpose and psychological assets such as agency and subjective well-being was also compared across groups. Results demonstrated that there were no differences by education level with regard to overall level of purpose or one’s purpose pathways, but education predicted purpose orientation and agency, even when controlling for purpose. The lack of difference in purpose between adults with different levels of education bodes well for the field, which has relied heavily on college student samples. Implications for existing and future research on purpose in life are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: Few studies have examined predictors of quality of life (QOL) of breast cancer survivors over time. Breast cancer survivors (n = 116) were asked to complete measures of QOL, mood, spirituality, and social support every 6 months from 2 to 4 years post treatment. Overall QOL at 4 years was predicted by previous physical and functional well-being, the breast cancer-specific items, and vigor and current levels of social support (Adj R 2 = .72, F = 30.53, p < .001). Physical QOL was predicted by previous levels of physical and functional well-being and current levels of functional and social/family well-being (Adj R 2 = .84, F = 44.30, p < .001). Functional well-being was predicted by prior levels of physical, functional, and social/family well-being and current levels of physical well-being and vigor (Adj R 2 = .72, F = 3–.53, p < .001). Emotional well-being was predicted by previous levels of emotional well-being and current physical well-being, the breast cancer-specific items, and anxiety (Adj R 2 = .60, F = 26.30, p < .001). Social/family well-being was predicted by previous levels of social/family well-being, social support, and confusion (Adj R 2 = .71, F = 34.18, p < <000). The breast cancer-specific items were predicted by age, previous levels of the breast cancer-specific items, confusion, and current levels of emotional and functional well-being and spirituality (Adj R 2 = .58, F = 17.57, p < .001). Overall and specific dimensions of QOL at 4 years were predicted by different combinations of QOL, mood, and spirituality. Interventions should be tailored to which dimensions of QOL are affected and other types of QOL as well as social support, mood, and spirituality as coping mechanisms that influence the specific dimension of QOL affected.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Applied Research in Quality of Life

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: As the occupational group that delivers public services, civil servants confront a particular working property and environment. Previous studies indicate that this professional group suffers from issues of occupational health, especially mental problems. This study investigates the group’s general health condition from the perspective of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The samples of the study consist of young civil servants working in the local government agencies of six relatively economically developed cities in eastern China. The five-dimensional European quality of health scale (EQ5D) and the twelve-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) are employed. We will compare the measuring differences between two measurements and discussed the feasibility of combing two. Results indicate that 75.5 % of the respondents have an undergraduate-level educational degree and below and that 72.7 % of the job position consists of the township staff level and below. The participants report unfavorable HRQOL measurement scores, particularly in the dimension of mental health. Low education and employment grade are two important negative factors. The dimensions of SF-12 and EQ5D are significantly correlated. EQ5D is more sensitive to the gender factor, whereas SF-12 has a higher sensitivity to the employment grade factor. We suggest that the results of these two scales are comparable and that they complement each other.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: Supportive relationships with neighbors have been shown to positively predict indicators of subjective well-being. Using data from the 2010 Japanese General Social Survey, we examine how neighbor relationships predict subjective well-being. Japan presents an interesting case to examine this question when considering its highly institutionalized neighborhood associations. We find that controlling for the safety and amenity aspects of the neighborhood environment, supportive neighbor relationships significantly increase men and women’s life satisfaction, but such relationships have a significant positive effect only on men’s happiness. The effects of neighborhood relationships on life satisfaction and happiness are significantly larger for men. Moreover, we find that the social and safety aspects of the neighborhood reinforce each other to increase life satisfaction also only for men. Implications of the gendered pattern of these results are discussed for future research on the association between neighbor relationships and subjective well-being in Japan and beyond. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS)
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: This study analyzes 2,617 10–15 year olds surveyed in wave 1 of the United Kingdom Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS). Specifically, it tests the associations of three variables with life satisfaction among early adolescents: parent–child relationship quality, being a perpetrator or victim of sibling bullying, and being a perpetrator or victim of friend bullying. The results suggest that all of these social relationships have significant associations with life satisfaction, both individually and in combination. Of the three, parent–child relationship quality explained the most variance in predicting life satisfaction. This is followed by friend victimization (i.e., being bullied by friends), whereas the influence of sibling victimization is significant but not as strong. This study also tests the interaction effects between parent–child relationship quality, sibling bullying, and friend bullying. The association of parent–child relationship quality with life satisfaction is found to be stronger among adolescents who were either victims of sibling bullying or of friend bullying, highlighting the protective importance of parent–child relationship quality. Lastly, when testing whether the influences of sibling bullying, friend bullying, and parent–child relationship quality vary between male and female adolescents, this study finds some significant gender differences. Specifically, the positive associations of lower friend victimization and better parent–child relationship quality with life satisfaction are found to be stronger among female adolescents. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS)
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: Speech and/or language difficulties (SaLD) can potentially compromise a child’s health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL). Very few studies have examined associations between SaLD, other child and family factors and HRQoL and none have been undertaken in Australia. We explore these associations using data from a nationally representative Australian sample of 4–5 year old children, extracted from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) (n = 4386). The Disability-Stress-Coping Model informed variable selection. Three domains of HRQoL were examined, and assessed on physical, emotional and social functioning subscales of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). SaLD measures included parent concern about speech/language (Parents’ Evaluation of Developmental Status) and receptive vocabulary ability (adapted Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III). Multiple regression analyses revealed that various child and family factors representing all constructs from the Disability-Stress-Coping Model were significantly associated with HRQoL. Specifically, HRQoL was positively associated with parental warmth and child’s general health and negatively associated with parent speech/language concerns and maternal depression across all domains. Parents with concerns about their pre-school child’s speech and language rate the quality of their child’s health more poorly across physical, emotional and social domains. Associations between parent speech/language concerns and HRQoL were notable for being apparent in a (non-clinical) population sample and for persisting independent of factors such as maternal depression, parenting style and the child’s general health.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: According to Buddhist teachings, giving without condition leads to a higher level of happiness. Even though there are a number of studies examining factors that determine happiness, none quantitatively examine happiness from the perspective of a “giving” relationship. Using a household dataset from Thailand, where Buddhism is the main religion, this paper suggests that religious and nonreligious giving leads to a higher happiness level than not giving at all. Moreover, for nonreligious giving, it is found that charitable giving in terms of money and goods gives a donor more happiness than does volunteer work, but that both types of giving enhance one’s happiness. Religious giving (offering food and dedicating other offerings to Buddhist monks) is also found to increase happiness, more so for respondents who regularly give for religious purposes. In particular, regularly giving to monks leads to the highest happiness level, perhaps since Buddhism permeates Thai society and dedicating offerings to monks is believed to provide great merit. In addition, when making offerings to monks, donors usually do it randomly, at a temple, which suggests that making merit at a temple also leads to higher level of happiness. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS).
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the influence of parental emotional support on adolescent self-esteem, emotional intelligence and adolescents’ happiness along with the possible mediating effects of emotional intelligence and self-esteem between parental emotional support and adolescent happiness. In addition, it explored whether the relationship among the variables differs according to the gender of parents and adolescents. Data were collected from 278 Korean high school students (140 males and 138 females). Multi-group structural equation modeling analyses were used to analyze the data. The results indicated that parental emotional support did not directly affect adolescent happiness, but rather influenced it indirectly through the mediating effect of self-esteem. While both maternal and paternal emotional support had a positive influence on self-esteem, only maternal emotional support had a significant impact on emotional intelligence, indicating that parental emotional support may have different influences on adolescent emotional intelligence according to the parents’ gender. The results also indicated that maternal/paternal emotional support may have a different impact according to adolescents’ gender. For male adolescents, only paternal emotional support affected happiness through self-esteem. For female adolescents, both maternal and paternal emotional support exerted a significant influence on happiness via self-esteem, whereas maternal support had a direct influence on all other variables. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS).
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: This paper illustrates the facility of time-use files to enhance the understanding of behavioral components of commuting. It draws on data from Statistics Canada’s most recent national General Social Survey (2010) to substantiate prior research on the extent that use of public transit for commuting to work is accompanied in people’s days by a greater amount of walking. By verifying alternative explanations for this relationship, the paper explores more thoroughly how walking fits into the daily lives of employed persons in large urban areas. Results show that travel by car comprises upwards of 80 per cent of trips regardless of the hour of the day, while public transportation is used mostly to get to and from paid work. Although walking generally accompanies such transit commutes and is shown to fit sequentially into transit’s temporal patterns, walking spreads out more evenly across the day than transit use and helps complete other trip purposes. The weekday walking pattern extends to weekend days to a surprisingly similar extent, confirming that transit is but one of numerous generators of walking trips. Statistically significant relationships link minutes walked to household income, access to a car, and main mode used for commuting. However, the pre-eminence of commuting by car raises questions about the effective priorities and constraints underlying choice of main commuting mode. More detailed characterization of transit access and subjective questions in time-use surveys could facilitate greater insight into the rationales of the subgroup choosing public transit and walking more frequently and for longer duration. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS)
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: Using latent class analyses (LCA), the present study aimed to test whether meaningful subtypes of internalizing and externalizing behaviors could be found among Chinese community-based adolescents. A total of 5244 adolescents, ages 11–18 years (M = 15.11, SD = 1.79) recruited from 16 Chinese middle schools completed the Chinese version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ-C). We examined the data using Latent Class Analysis to identify subtypes of internalizing and externalizing behaviors among the adolescents. Multivariate Logistic regression was subsequently implemented to ascertain the relationships between latent classes and demographic covariates. Three distinct subtypes were uncovered: a high-risk group, a middle-risk group and a low-risk group; the three subtypes accounted for 19.8, 31.1, and 49.1 % of the total sample variance respectively. Youth with elevations in one behavior type were likely to have elevations in the other behavior type. Further analyses revealed that compared to the low-risk group, the adolescents from the high-risk group and middle-risk groups were female and older. Significant heterogeneity in internalizing and externalizing behaviors was revealed in this Chinese adolescent’s sample. Profiling behavior problems patterns is potentially useful as a first step in developing tailored prevention and intervention programs. Suggestions for future research, including cross-national studies, and implications for mental health professionals were discussed. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS)
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: Previous literature has demonstrated that family wealth (or parental wealth) has a significant effect on the life satisfaction of children, but the exact mechanism behind this effect remains unknown. This study thus investigates the extent to which parental wealth can have an effect on the child’s life satisfaction through parental life satisfaction and the child’s wealth, using data from the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study. This study tries to extend existing knowledge of the effect of family background on the child’s life satisfaction, by linking two related phenomena known as intergenerational transmission of life satisfaction and intergenerational transmission of wealth. This study shows that parents’ net wealth has an effect on the child’s life satisfaction through two important mediating factors, specifically, their own life satisfaction and the child’s net wealth. This empirical evidence sheds light on the mechanism that links parental wealth and the child’s life satisfaction. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS)
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: Situated within a positive psychology perspective, the present study explored the relationship between school belonging and subjective well-being (SWB) in school among elementary school students. In order to ensure the applicability of the Brief Adolescents’ Subjective Well-Being in School Scale (BASWBSS) to elementary school students, firstly, we provided evidence for its validity using two samples (total n = 1333) of elementary school students. Secondly, we used cross-lagged structural equation modeling techniques to evaluate the nature and directionality of relationships between school belonging and SWB in school. To test these relationships, 890 students (58.54 % male) completed a measure of school belonging and SWB in school at two time points, 6 weeks apart. The results showed that (1) BASWBSS has good applicability among elementary school students and (2) significant bidirectional relationships were found between school belonging and SWB in school. Overall, the present study provided important evidence of applicability of the BASWBSS with elementary school students and the role of school belonging in elementary school age children’s SWB in school. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and The International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS)
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life
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    ABSTRACT: In World Suffering and Quality of Life Anderson diligently integrates different points of view by a carefully selected group of researchers in the field, into a compelling 32-chapter handbook. He masterfully included 45 leading experts from 16 different countries from all over the world, delivering the first of its kind compilation with a diverse cultural and conceptual approach. In this book different scientific and psychological views are presented, in contrast to the classical religious and philosophical approaches predominating until now.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Applied Research in Quality of Life