South American Journal of Herpetology

Publisher: Sociedade Brasileira de Herpetologia

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Other titles South American journal of herpetology (Online)
ISSN 1808-9798
OCLC 81146246
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Preliminary findings regarding black turtle (Chelonia mydas agassizii) occurrence in Lobos de Tierra Island, Northern Peru showed that 95% and 5% of turtles were juveniles and sub-adults, respectively, with an overall mean curved carapace length of 57.5 ± 7 cm (26.0–74.4 cm, n = 199). A total mean density of 180.4 turtles/km2 was found with highest densities found in bays and inlets located in the southeast. Inshore densities in shallow waters (< 1.5 m) were almost one order of magnitude greater than offshore at ∼ 1.5 km. In addition, based on structured qualitative interviews with fishermen, sea turtle capture and consumption still exists in the island, though occasional and sporadic. Jellyfish (Chrysaora plocamia) and green algae (Ulva sp.) consumption plays an important role in black turtle aggregations in the island, where densities are quite high compared to other feeding grounds elsewhere. We conclude that Lobos de Tierra constitutes an important Peruvian feeding ground, with high black turtle aggregations, close to the northern limit of the cold Humboldt Current.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · South American Journal of Herpetology
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to test the influence of different riparian habitats on the structure of anuran communities in southeastern Brazil. Nine stream stretches were selected representing three different riparian habitat types: Native Forest, Secondary Forest, and Sugarcane. A total of 223 individuals of 17 species and five families were captured. The Chao1 richness index indicated that after standardizing the sampling effort the Native Forest sites had higher richness than the Secondary Forests and Sugarcane sites, which presented similar richness. The Abundance and Biomass Curves for the Native Forest sites showed an overlap of the weight and abundance curves, suggesting that these sites presented lower disturbance levels. A disturbance gradient from Native Forest towards Sugarcane sites was observed. The Bray-Curtis similarity index showed a significant effect of riparian condition on species composition. Our results suggest that Sugarcane and Secondary Forest sites limit the distribution of certain species, such as those from the family Hylidae species related to litterfall, and enable colonization by open-habitat species that are capable of resisting anthropic pressure.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · South American Journal of Herpetology
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    ABSTRACT: The anomalepidid Liotyphlops beui is a small blindsnake that is abundant in the city of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. Data on body size, sexual size dimorphism, reproductive cycles, and food habits of this snake were obtained from the dissection of 177 specimens from this locality. The present paper compares basic aspects of the natural history of this anomalepidid with those of other Scolecophidia from Leptotyphlopidae and Typhlopidae to detect similarities or differences between these snakes. Females attain larger body size than males, whereas males have longer tails. Reproductive cycle in females is seasonal, with vitellogenesis occurring at the onset of the rainy season. Data on the diameter of deferent ducts indicate that mating occurred during this period. Clutch size ranged from 4–24 eggs. Liotyphlops beui feeds almost entirely on larvae and pupae of small ants, occasionally adult ants, and rarely termites. This snake gorges itself and seems to be able to eat a dozen different-sized prey in a meal. The availability of its main prey, the fire ant (Solenopsis spp.), may explain the high abundance of this blindsnake in the city of São Paulo. The data obtained in this study for L. beui indicate that the ecological traits of the three families of Scolecophidia are highly conservative.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · South American Journal of Herpetology
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    ABSTRACT: We report the undescribed advertisement calls of Diasporus gularis and D.Tinker from the Colombian Pacific region. The call of D. gularis is a "whistle" consisting of a tonal note with four harmonics emitted at a frequency range from 2.6 kHz (frequency 5%) to 3.0 kHz (frequency 95%) and a peak frequency of 2.8 kHz. The call of D.Tinker is a "tink," has a single peaked note with two harmonics, a frequency range from 3.2 kHz (frequency 5%) to 3.6 kHz (frequency 95%), and a peak frequency of 3.4 kHz. According to the call traits reported within the genus Diasporus, we propose that D. gularis and D.Tinker are acoustically more similar to D. citrinobapheus and D. anthrax, respectively. However, due to the lack of a complete phylogenetic tree for this clade, we cannot hypothesize if the call similarities between these species owe to a close phylogenetic relationship or convergent evolution in similar habitats.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · South American Journal of Herpetology
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    ABSTRACT: Studying the mating system of wild populations of American crocodiles, Crocodylus acutus, has important conservation implications. We conducted a preliminary analysis of the mating system of C. acutus in Las Baulas (2007 and 2008), Santa Rosa (2007) and Palo Verde (2008 and 2009) National Parks in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We captured hatchlings during crocodile surveys and analyzed them with nine polymorphic microsatellite loci to determine relatedness values. High relatedness values indicated that full and half siblings were sampled in a single locality and season. We found full siblings between the years that hatchlings were collected in Las Baulas and Palo Verde National Parks, which suggested mate fidelity. The mate fidelity and high relatedness values could be a consequence of the smaller number of adult crocodiles found within these areas or indicative of a small number of dominant males in the populations. Our results support the need to conduct future studies describing the mating system and nesting success within populations of C. acutus. Understanding of these population factors is crucial to the continued success and maintenance of viable populations of C. acutus.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · South American Journal of Herpetology
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    ABSTRACT: Male intromittent organs serve two primary reproductive functions: the physical entry into the female body during copulation and the effective delivery of gametes resulting in internal fertilization. Here we present a histological examination of the adult male American alligator phallus semen delivery apparatus, the sulcus spermaticus. While the highly collagenous basal crurae and more distal shaft of the alligator penis contain the rigid structures that facilitate cloacal intromission, the sulcus is more functionally intricate. Here we show the sulcus spermaticus (an open groove that runs along the ventral aspect of the phallic shaft) to be a spatially heterogeneous reproductive structure containing a complex architecture of multiple tissue types. Sulcus morphology markedly changes from its proximal origin between the crurae to its distal exit from the phallus tip. At the proximal origin of the sulcus, the ductus deferens vent semen into an expanded lumen lined by a convoluted secretory epithelium. Along the length of the phallic shaft, an arrangement of longitudinally and radially oriented smooth muscle bundles may act via rhythmic contractions to produce peristaltic sperm conveyance through the sulcus. An extensive vascular network of blood and lymph vessels putatively engorges the sulcus tissues during reproductive activity, increasing tension on an internal network of connective tissues and leading to localized inflation and increased tissue rigidity. We hypothesize that this engorgement works to seal the sulcus groove and allow the structure to convey semen through a functionally closed tube. Further, numerous epithelial secretory cells contribute seminal fluids to the ejaculate and may aid in as yet uncharacterized aspects of sulcus functioning. Together, these observations establish that the sulcus spermaticus is far more than a simple furrow in the phallus shaft for sperm conduction: it contains elements that form a complex functional gamete delivery system.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · South American Journal of Herpetology