TQM Journal

Publisher: Emerald

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ISSN 1754-2731

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Emerald

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    • Voluntary deposit by author of author's pre-print or author's post-print allowed on author's personal website or Institutional repository
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    • Publisher last contacted on 02/04/2013
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Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to identify the perception of TQM benefits, practices and obstacles in Kuwaiti industrial organizations certified against ISO9001:2000 (or later) and following a TQM approach. Since a discrepancy in perception between project managers (PMs) and quality management representatives (QMRs) of organizations in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries has already been identified (Jaeger and Adair 2012), this study is comparing the perception of these two groups in more depth. Representatives of both groups have been individually interviewed, and their responses have been analysed against classification systems for TQM benefits, practices and obstacles, as found in the literature. It emerges that all responses matched one of the benefits, obstacles and practices of the classification system. Comparing the total group of PMs with the total group of QMRs, it was found that both groups agree on the most important practice (i.e. an implemented management system) and obstacle (i.e. lack of employee involvement). However, they disagree on the most important TQM benefit (PMs: quality of products and services, QMRs: productivity). The results of the total groups and sub-groups give new insights regarding the different perceptions of PMs and QMRs. Also, the results enable practitioners of these two functions to discuss the differences and align their perceptions, in order to increase the effectiveness of the TQM approach in their organizations and finally, the results allow management consultants to focus on areas with high potential for improvements.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · TQM Journal
  • Martin Jaeger · Desmond Adair

    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · TQM Journal
  • Hadi Akbarzade Khorshidi · Sanaz Nikfalazar · Indra Gunawan

    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · TQM Journal
  • Rodrigo Valio Dominguez Gonzalez · Manoel Fernando Martins

    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · TQM Journal
  • Shreya Das · Debapratim Pandit

    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · TQM Journal
  • Salvatore Moccia

    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · TQM Journal
  • Gholamhossein Mehralian · Jamal A Nazari · Hamid Reza Rasekh · Sajjad Hosseini

    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · TQM Journal
  • Li-Hsing Ho · Pi-Yun Chang · Tieh-Min Yen

    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · TQM Journal
  • Marcus Assarlind · Ida Gremyr

    No preview · Article · Mar 2016 · TQM Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to study how an account of multiple patient roles when using the Kano model in healthcare improvements can support identification of a wide range of patients needs. Design/methodology/approach The study presented in this paper was part of a longitudinal action research study. The empirical material was collected by various methods (interviews, a focus group, participative observations, and a survey) over a two-month period within the Childrens and Womens Healthcare department in a Swedish hospital. The respondents included the management team, healthcare professionals, patients, and the patients partners. Findings The study shows that incorporating a view of multiple patient roles into application of the Kano model, and using input on customer needs obtained from patients, relatives, and healthcare professionals, helps to identify a wide range of patients needs. Originality/value The view on patients within healthcare is being transformed from one based on servility to that of patients as customers. This paper elaborates on a hands-on way of applying the Kano model based on a view of multiple patient roles as a means to support this new patient view. Theapplication builds on input from various groups (such as patients and healthcare professionals), and, by using input from various stakeholders. This approach appears to overcome a gap, identified in earlier research, of either relying solely on patients, or solely on healthcare professionals, when identifying patients need. Rather input from several groups patients, relatives, and professionals are suggested to be used in combination.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · TQM Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Four learning modes, interacting through students as different learning systems, are mapped into a cone-of-learning continuum that allows tertiary institutions to visually re-consider where within their cone-of-learning, they choose to position their learning approaches. Two forms of blended learning are also distinguished. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach Undergraduate law, business, IT, and creative arts student perceptions are structural equation modelled (SEM) into traditional, blended-enabled, blended-enhanced, and flexible learning systems. Findings Within the SEM derived learning cone-of-learning continuum, a migration from traditional learning systems towards blended and flexible learning systems typically offers higher-net level s of undergraduate student learning experiences and outcomes. Research limitations/implications The authors do not capture learning system feedback loops, but the cone-of-learning approaches can position against chosen competitors. The authors recognise benchmark, positioning, and transferability differences may exist between different tertiary institutions; different learning areas; and different countries of operation. Cone-of-learning studies can expand to capture student perceptions of their value acquisitions, overall satisfaction, plus trust, and loyalty considerations. Practical implications The cone-of-learning shows shifts towards flexibility as generating higher student learning experiences, higher student learning outcomes, and as flexible technologies mature this demands higher student inputs. These interactive experiential systems approaches can readily incorporate new technologies, amifications, and engagements which are testable for additional student deep-learning contributions. Experiential deep-learning systems also have wide industrial applications. Social implications Understanding the continuum of transitioning between and across deeper-learning systems offers general social benefit. Originality/value Learning system studies remain complex, variable systems, dependent on instructors, students, and their shared experiential engagements environments. This cone-of-learning continuum approach is useful for educators, business, and societal life-long learners who seek to gauge learning and outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · TQM Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to focus on developing a knowledge-based engineering (KBE) approach to recycle the knowledge accrued in an industrial organization for the mitigation of unwanted events due to human error. The recycling of the accrued knowledge is vital in mitigating the variance present at different levels of engineering applications, evaluations and assessments in assuring systems safety. The approach is illustrated in relation to subsea systems functional failure risk (FFR) analysis. Design/methodology/approach A fuzzy expert system (FES)-based approach has been proposed to facilitate FFR assessment and to make knowledge recycling possible via a rule base and membership functions (MFs). The MFs have been developed based on the experts knowledge, data, information, and on their insights into the selected subsea system. The rule base has been developed to fulfill requirements and guidelines specified in DNV standard DNV-RP-F116 and NORSOK standard Z-008. Findings It is possible to use the FES-based KBE approach to make FFR assessments of the equipment installed in a subsea system, focussing on potential functional failures and related consequences. It is possible to integrate the aforementioned approach in an engineering service providers existing structured information management system or in the computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) available in an asset owners industrial organization. Research limitations/implications The FES-based KBE approach provides a consistent way to incorporate actual circumstances at the boundary of the input ranges or at the levels of linguistic data and risk categories. It minimizes the variations present in the assessments. Originality/value The FES-based KBE approach has been demonstrated in relation to the requirements and guidelines specified in DNV standard DNV-RP-F116 and NORSOK standard Z-008. The suggested KBE-based FES that has been utilized for FFR assessment allows the relevant quantitative and qualitative data (or information) related to equipment installed in subsea systems to be employed in a coherent manner with less variability, while improving the quality of inspection and maintenance recommendations.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · TQM Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand the success of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in banking and financial services industry and to develop a structured stakeholders management model for successful LSS project management. Design/methodology/approach – A two-phase methodology is used. Phase 1 establishes the literature to understand two key process improvement methodologies – Lean and Six Sigma and to derive synergies by their combination leading to success in banking and financial services. The literature also helps to recognize the importance of stakeholder management in LSS projects and to understand how it helps in accelerating change in organizations. Phase 2 of the methodology is based on the interviews conducted by 56 global LSS project managers. This is to understand the practical challenges faced by the LSS project managers in banking and financial services tying back to the existing literature. Findings – The paper identifies the possible opportunities for structured stakeholder management across different phases of Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control (DMAIC) project flow. The first of this kind, “Inform-Involve-Influence” model has been developed based on the understanding from literature and conclusions from the interviews conducted. The proposed model highlights the different set of stakeholders involved in LSS projects and their role in the project. The model also helps categorizing the stakeholders based on the DMAIC phases. Research limitations/implications – The paper is limited to readymade use in banking and financial service environments for LSS projects. However the paper sets a platform for further research to customize the proposed model for other service industries. Practical implications – The model proposed as part of the paper helps project managers to inform, involve and influence different set of stakeholders at different phases of the DMAIC flow. The model leaves an opportunity for further research and customization for other service industries outside the banking and financial services space like hospitality, government, heath care, etc. Benefits and limitations of the model were presented as part of the paper. Originality/value – The paper is the original work contributed by the author. Both the survey findings and the model developed are author’s original contribution for both academicians and corporate professionals.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · TQM Journal
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    ABSTRACT: systems (QMS)-related problems faced by management representatives. Design/methodology/approach The survey was carried out on certified organisations by means of a self-administrated questionnaire. A total of 97 organisations participated in the study. Findings It was found that the majority of management representatives believe themselves to be well aware of the weaknesses in their respective organisations and of the underlying causes. They also maintain that they know how to overcome them. They perceive insufficient involvement on the part of managers and staff and limited resources as being far more crucial problems. Research limitations/implications The sample only covers 97 organisations, so including more entities would be strongly recommended in any future research. This would enable grouping by general characteristics, such as businesses and public administration, for instance, and allow a comparative analysis to be conducted. Furthermore, as the data in this study were collected from management representatives and are based on their subjective evaluations, they should be set in the perspective of other viewpoints, for example those of top management and internal auditors. Practical implications The survey data make it possible to identify the personal traits and competences required for the role of management representative. An analysis of the problems identified by means of the survey indicates that those competences should fall within the areas of internal communication, motivation and so forth. Originality/value ISO 9001 pays little attention to the competences and role of a management representative. Empirical research on the subject is also lacking. The survey results and their analysis presented here contribute towards a better understanding of the sources of success or failure in implementing, maintaining and improving a QMS.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · TQM Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the joint effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and total quality management (TQM) on the organizational performance. In addition, this study aimed to examine the ability of TQM to transmit the effect of EO on the organizational performance. Design/methodology/approach To examine the hypothesized model of the study, the survey questionnaire research design was employed. The data were collected from Dubai police department. The total number of questionnaires distributed was 320 out of which only 111 usable questionnaires were returned. The structural equation modeling partial least squares approach was used.Findings The statistical results confirmed the effect of EO and TQM on the organizational performance. In addition, TQM was found to partially mediate the effect of EO on organizational performance. Practical implications Further details and valuable implications of this study were discussed throughout the study. The results of this study have many practical implications. The results will help managers to make the proper decisions when deciding to implement TQM in their organizations. TQM can help managers with strong EO to achieve maximum performance in organizations and to remain competitive in the market. Originality/value This study is a rare and unique empirical study that examines the effect of EO on TQM and the mediating effect of TQM on the EO-performance relationship.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · TQM Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Today substantial investments are made to improve the bottom line and cost of quality (CoQ) is a tool that identifies weaker areas where these investments should be directed. In literature, the authors find various CoQ models and their applications but it is deficient in providing a standard format of a "Quality Cost Procedure" for a CoQ programs company-wide deployment. A procedure was thus developed and its effectiveness was evaluated implementation. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach CoQ program was implemented in the production department of a wood products manufacturer using the action research approach. Prevention, Appraisal and Failure Cost model was employed. Data collection was challenging, however, stakeholders were interviewed, data were acquired from Management Information System and various reports were reviewed for cost elements. Findings Total CoQ as a percentage of sales was found to be 11, while as a percentage of material cost was 15 percent. It was found through the implementation that development of a quality cost procedure is highly iterative in nature and a standard format is proposed in the Appendix. This procedure worked satisfactorily and the company is confident in moving to the next phase of companywide deployment of CoQ Program. Originality/value A robust "Quality Cost Procedure" is developed, which not only helped the company but will serve CoQ implementers in their operational as well as tactical levels of management. CoQ implementation prior development of procedure brought conviction and accredited it. Practitioners can mold this procedure as per need, which will further enhance the body of knowledge on CoQ.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · TQM Journal