Expert Review of Vaccines

Publisher: Expert Reviews

Current impact factor: 4.21

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 4.21
2013 Impact Factor 4.217
2012 Impact Factor 4.219
2011 Impact Factor 4.251
2010 Impact Factor 4.145
2009 Impact Factor 4.214
2008 Impact Factor 2.979
2007 Impact Factor 2.111

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.88
Cited half-life 4.20
Immediacy index 0.90
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 1.20
ISSN 1744-8395

Publisher details

Expert Reviews

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  • Post-print
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    • 12 months embargo
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    • Non-Commercial
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    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • NIH funded authors may post articles to PubMed Central for release 12 months after publication
    • Wellcome Trust authors may deposit in Europe PMC after 6 months
    • 'Expert Reviews (formerly Future Drugs)' is an imprint of 'Informa Healthcare'
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dengue vaccine introduction will likely occur soon. However, little has been published on international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy. More effort at the international level is required to review, unify and strategically disseminate dengue vaccine knowledge to endemic countries' decision makers and potential donors. Waiting to plan for the introduction of new vaccines until licensure may delay access in developing countries. Concerted efforts to communicate and advocate for vaccines prior to licensure are likely challenged by unknowns of the use of dengue vaccines and the disease, including uncertainties of vaccine performance and safety, vaccine access and dengue's complex pathogenesis and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the international community has the opportunity to apply previous best practices for vaccine communication and advocacy. The following key strategies will strengthen international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy: consolidating existing coalitions under one strategic umbrella, urgently convening stakeholders to formulate the roadmap for integrated dengue prevention and control, and improving the dissemination of dengue scientific knowledge.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Hepatitis A and B are two of the most common vaccine-preventable diseases and vaccination for Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) is recommended for those at risk of contracting HAV and/or HBV through their occupation, travel or lifestyle. Objective: To describe the vaccine efficacy, immunogenicity, effectiveness and safety of the combined vaccine against hepatitis A and hepatitis B. Methods: A systematic review of the literature published between 1990 and 2015. Results: Anti-HAV seropositivity rates ranged from 96.2% to 100% and anti-HBs seroprotection rates from 82% to 100%. Antibodies persisted up to 15 years and geometric mean concentration (GMC) remained above the seropositivity cut-off value for both. Anti-HAV and anti-HBs immune responses were lower in less immunocompetent individuals one month after completion of the immunization schedule. The safety profiles of Twinrix(TM) and monovalent hepatitis A and B vaccines were similar. Conclusion: The vaccine offers satisfactory long-term immunogenicity rates, expected duration of protection and safety profile similar to the monovalent hepatitis A or B vaccines.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: HIV causes infection and progressive depletion of human CD4 T cells. Emerging data have shown that antigen-specific CD4 T-cell subsets manifest differential susceptibility to HIV, potentially leading to pathogen-specific immune failure and opportunistic infections. This concept was recently explored in context of vectors utilized in HIV vaccine trials, and the data suggest that adenovirus type 5(Ad5)-specific CD4 T cells elicited by Ad5-HIV vaccine may be particularly susceptible to HIV, potentially rendering Ad5 vaccine recipients susceptible to HIV acquisition. We here examined recent data regarding the HIV susceptibility of antigen-specific CD4 T cells induced during infection or HIV vaccination and discussed its potential impact on HIV acquisition risk posed by HIV vaccination.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: CYD-TDV is the first dengue vaccine to have completed Phase 3 efficacy trials. Efficacy was consistently higher in those aged 9 and above for all variables studied: efficacy against virologically confirmed dengue of any severity and serotype, serotype specific efficacy, efficacy dependent on baseline seropositivity, efficacy against hospitalizations and efficacy against severe disease. Because of the higher efficacy and the absence of a safety signal, the age group with the best benefit of the use of CYD-TDV is individuals aged 9 and above – the age group for which licensure is now being sought.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatitis E is an emerging global disease caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection. While in developing countries the infection was primarily due to poor sanitary conditions through intake of contaminated water or undercooked meats of infected animals, increasing cases of chronic hepatitis E resulting in rapidly progressive liver cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease have been reported in organ transplant patients or in immune compromised patients in developed countries. Fortunately, hepatitis E is now a vaccine preventable disease with a HEV239 based vaccine licensed for human use. Much work is needed to enable its use outside China. This review recounted the development process of the vaccine, outlined the critical quality attributes of the vaccine antigen and, most importantly, listed the populations at risk for HEV infection and the subsequent disease. These at risk populations could benefit the most from the vaccination if the vaccine is widely adopted.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) has been a major threat to livestock across the world. The predominant method of controlling this disease in endemic regions is through regular vaccination with inactivated vaccine. However, there are many limitations. For instance, cultivation of virulent FMD virus (FMDV) in the manufacturing units poses a risk of escape from production sites. Vaccines may sometimes contain traces of FMD viral non-structural proteins (NSPs), therefore, interfering with the NSP-based serological differentiation infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Moreover, vaccines are unable to eliminate virus from carrier animals. To address the shortcomings of inactivated vaccines, many efforts are currently devoted to develop novel vaccines including attenuated and/or marker inactivated vaccines, recombinant protein vaccines, synthetic peptide vaccines, and empty capsid vaccines. Here, we review the research progress of novel vaccines, problems that remain to be solved, and also raise some suggestions that would help in the development of FMD vaccines.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: There have been significant decreases in malaria mortality and morbidity in the last 10-15 years, and the most advanced pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine, RTS,S, received a positive opinion from European regulators in July 2015. However, no blood-stage vaccine has reached a phase III trial. The first part of this review summarizes the pros and cons of various assays and models that have been and will be used to predict the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines. In the second part, blood-stage vaccine candidates that showed some efficacy in human clinical trials or controlled human malaria infection models are discussed. Then, candidates under clinical investigation are described in the third part, and other novel candidates and strategies are reviewed in the last part.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: On December 3rd 2015, the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) approved the first inactivated Enterovirus 71 (EV71) whole virus vaccine for preventing severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). As one of the few preventive vaccines for children's infectious diseases generated by the developing countries in recent years, EV71 vaccine is a blessing to children's health in China and worldwide. However, there are still a few challenges facing the worldwide use of EV71 vaccine, including the applicability against various EV71 pandemic strains in other countries, international requirements on vaccine production and quality control, standardization and harmonization on different pathogen monitoring and detecting methods, etc. In addition, the affordability of EV71 vaccine in other countries is a factor to be considered in HFMD prevention. Therefore, with EV71 vaccine commercially available, there is still a long way to go before reaching effective protection against severe HFMD after EV71 vaccines enter the market. In this paper, the bottlenecks and prospects for the wide use of EV71 vaccine after its approval are evaluated.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: In the two decades since their initial discovery, DNA vaccines technologies have come a long way. Unfortunately, when applied to human subjects inadequate immunogenicity is still the biggest challenge for practical DNA vaccine use. Many different strategies have been tested in preclinical models to address this problem, including novel plasmid vectors and codon optimization to enhance antigen expression, new gene transfection systems or electroporation to increase delivery efficiency, protein or live virus vector boosting regimens to maximise immune stimulation, and formulation of DNA vaccines with traditional or molecular adjuvants. Better understanding of the mechanisms of action of DNA vaccines has also enabled better use of the intrinsic host response to DNA to improve vaccine immunogenicity. This review summarizes recent advances in DNA vaccine technologies and related intracellular events and how these might impact on future directions of DNA vaccine development.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: This study aimed to assess whether influenza vaccination reduces the risk of severe and fatal outcomes in influenza inpatients aged ≥65 years. Methods: During the 2013-2014 influenza season persons aged ≥65 years hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza were selected in 19 Spanish hospitals. A severe influenza case was defined as admission to the intensive care unit, death in hospital or within 30 days after admission. Logistic regression was used to compare the influenza vaccination status between severe and non-severe influenza inpatients. Results: Of 433 influenza confirmed patients, 81 (19%) were severe cases. Vaccination reduced the risk of severe illness (odds ratio: 0.57; 95%CI: 0.33-0.98). The cumulative number of influenza vaccine doses received since the 2010-2011 season was associated with a lower risk of severe influenza (odds ratio: 0.78; 95% CI 0.66-0.91). Conclusion: Adherence to seasonal influenza vaccination in the elderly may reduce the risk of severe influenza outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: Human paramyxoviruses are the etiological agents for life-threatening respiratory virus infections of infants and young children. These viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the human parainfluenza viruses (hPIV1-4) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV), are responsible for millions of serious lower respiratory tract infections each year worldwide. There are currently no standard treatments and no licensed vaccines for any of these pathogens. Here we review research with which Sendai virus, a mouse parainfluenza virus type 1, is being advanced as a Jennerian vaccine for hPIV1 and as a backbone for RSV, hMPV and other hPIV vaccines for children.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: While immunoglobulin biologicals are increasingly used during pregnancy, there have been concerns on the immune function and vaccination of infants born to mothers taking immunoglobulin biologicals. In addition to the detection of biologicals in cord blood, cases of severe neonatal neutropenia and fatal dissemination of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) have been reported. With increasing number of infants exposed to immunoglobulin biologicals in utero, there is a need to address the challenges in vaccinating these infants. This review summarizes the available evidence to discuss the issues of immunoglobulin biological exposure in utero, neonatal immune function, long-term immune development, and the challenges and strategies of vaccinating newborns and infants who were born to mothers taking biologicals during pregnancy.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: The distinctive immune system characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease (KD) could suggest that they respond in a particular way to all antigenic stimulations, including those due to vaccines. Moreover, treatment of KD is mainly based on immunomodulatory therapy. These factors suggest that vaccines and KD may interact in several ways. These interactions could be of clinical relevance because KD is a disease of younger children who receive most of the vaccines recommended for infectious disease prevention. This paper shows that available evidence does not support an association between KD development and vaccine administration. Moreover, it highlights that administration of routine vaccines is mandatory even in children with KD and all efforts must be made to ensure the highest degree of protection against vaccine-preventable diseases for these patients. However, studies are needed to clarify currently unsolved issues, especially issues related to immunologic interference induced by intravenous immunoglobulin and biological drugs.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: Recent technological advances in genomics, mass spectrometry, and epitope identification algorithms offer significant potential to identify novel antigenic targets for vaccine and immunotherapeutic development. On 30 April 2015, leading immunologists and bioinformatics scientists met to consider how best to utilize these advances towards deciphering the human antigenome and exploiting this information for prevention and control of infectious and neoplastic diseases.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Expert Review of Vaccines
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    ABSTRACT: The pre-erythrocytic stage of infection by malaria parasites represents a key target for vaccines that aim to eradicate malaria. Two important broad immune evasion strategies that can interfere with vaccine efficacy include the induction of dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction and regulatory T cells (Tregs) by blood-stage malaria parasites, leading to inefficient priming of T cells targeting liver-stage infections. The parasite also uses 'surgical strike' strategies, whereby polymorphism in pre-erythrocytic antigens can interfere with host immunity. Specifically, we review how even single amino acid changes in T cell epitopes can lead to loss of binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC), lack of cross-reactivity, or antagonism and immune interference, where simultaneous or sequential stimulation with related variants of the same T cell epitope can cause T cell anergy or the conversion of effector to immunosuppressive T cell phenotypes.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Expert Review of Vaccines