Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery

Publisher: Informa Healthcare

Current impact factor: 4.84

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 4.84
2013 Impact Factor 4.116
2012 Impact Factor 4.869
2011 Impact Factor 4.896
2010 Impact Factor 4.482
2009 Impact Factor 3.345

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 5.02
Cited half-life 4.40
Immediacy index 1.05
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 1.16
ISSN 1744-7593

Publisher details

Informa Healthcare

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website or institution website
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Non-commercial
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • NIH funded authors may post articles to PubMed Central for release 12 months after publication
    • Wellcome Trust authors may deposit in Europe PMC after 6 months
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction Although safer and easier to use antidepressants (ie.,SSRIs/SNRIs) have largely displaced MAOIs, these medications still have a role in difficult to treat conditions. Efforts to improve MAOIs benefit-risk profile resulted on the reversible MAOI and in the first antidepressant patch (selegiline transdermal delivery system-STS). The later had been available in the US since 2006. Thus a review on its safety profile and comparative efficacy is timely. Areas covered This review provides an overview of STS's clinical pharmacology and summarizes what has been learned across nearly a decade of experience. Product labels and the search engine PubMed were used to obtain relevant information. Expert opinion STS remains a unique treatment option. It is the only FDA-approved antidepressant for patients with significant problems ingesting, tolerating, or absorbing oral medications. It remains the only MAOI that can be initiated without dietary restrictions at a therapeutic dose and has a low incidence of side effects when compared to other MAOIs. STS also provides an interesting option for depressed patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. However these advantages are counterweighted by drawbacks including the need for wash-out periods and the lack of convincing data illustrating its utility for treatment of more severe, treatment refractory depression.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Exposure to heat can impact the clinical efficacy and/or safety of transdermal and topical drug products. Understanding these heat effects and designing meaningful in vitro and in vivo methods to study them are of significant value to the development and evaluation of drug products dosed to the skin. Areas covered: This review provides an overview of the underlying mechanisms and the observed effects of heat on the skin and on transdermal/topical drug delivery, thermoregulation and heat tolerability. The designs of several in vitro and in vivo heat effect studies and their results are reviewed. Expert opinion: There is substantial evidence that elevated temperature can increase transdermal/topical drug delivery. However, in vitro and in vivo methods reported in the literature to study heat effects of transdermal/topical drug products have utilized inconsistent study conditions, and in vitro models require better characterization. Appropriate study designs and controls remain to be identified, and further research is warranted to evaluate in vitro-in vivo correlations and the ability of in vitro models to predict in vivo effects. The physicochemical and pharmacological properties of the drug(s) and the drug product, as well as dermal clearance and heat gradients may require careful consideration.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Oral delivery of therapeutic peptide hormones offers the promise of greater patient compliance when compared to parenteral administration routes. However, it is a huge challenge in the pharmaceutical field. Due to increasing demand for oral delivery of peptide hormones such as insulin, gonadotropin-releasing hormones, and calcitonin, various technologies have been explored to overcome the associated hurdles. Areas covered: This review article summarizes the physiological barriers to the oral delivery of peptide hormones and some of the key strategies to circumvent these barriers and enhance peptide hormones' oral bioavailability. In addition, recent advances in oral formulation strategies of peptide hormones, under development and within the clinical trial stages, are discussed. Expert Opinion: The pharmaceutical industry has devoted much effort to develop new, and often complex peptide hormone products based on formulation strategy. Use of the native structure of the peptide hormones in oral formulations could result in an unpredictable pharmacokinetic profile. Authors believe that considering chemical modification prior to formulation is essential to achieve orally active products. Although no major breakthrough has been achieved for effective oral delivery of peptides hormones yet, the substantial efforts by industrial and academic laboratories might yield successful results in near future.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Electrospinning is a facile method to fabricate fibers with diameters in the order of several nanometers to a few micrometers. This technology has great potential for preparing drug delivery systems and has received a great deal of attention in recent years. Combined with the certain nanocarriers such as micelles, nanoparticles and vesicles, the electrospinning fibrous membrane becomes an efficient and helpful platform for the above-mentioned formulations to achieve sustained and targeted release. Areas covered: The developmental process of electrospinning technology, the drugs and the materials electrospun into drug delivery systems are briefly summarized. The application of electrospinning technology in the biomedical field and its current progress are emphasized. Expert opinion: Development of a safe, efficient and multifunctional electrospinning drug delivery system is urgently needed; however, further work is required before this can be achieved. Cross-disciplinary strategies that cover pharmaceutical science, material science and computer science may provide guidance in bringing electrospinning technology in drug delivery to fruition.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Ischemic stroke is caused by reduced blood supply and leads to loss of brain function. The reduced oxygen and nutrient supply stimulates various physiological responses, including induction of growth factors. Growth factors prevent neuronal cell death, promote neovascularization, and induce cell growth. However, the concentration of growth factors is not sufficient to recover brain function after the ischemic damage, suggesting that delivery of growth factors into the ischemic brain may be a useful treatment for ischemic stroke. Areas covered: In this review, various approaches for the delivery of growth factors to ischemic brain tissue are discussed, including local and targeting delivery systems. Expert opinion: To develop growth factor therapy for ischemic stroke, important considerations should be taken into account. First, growth factors may have possible side effects. Thus, concentration of growth factors should be restricted to the ischemic tissues by local administration or targeted delivery. Second, the duration of growth factor therapy should be optimized. Growth factor proteins may be degraded too fast to have a high enough therapeutic effect. Therefore, delivery systems for controlled release or gene delivery may be useful. Third, the delivery systems to the brain should be optimized according to the delivery route.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Crystallization of actives in skin following topical application was suggested by studies in the 1950s and 1960s but is poorly understood. In contrast, the problem of crystallisation of actives on skin and in transdermal formulations has been known for many years. Areas covered: With respect to crystallisation in skin, this review describes early reports of a skin "reservoir" and possible reasons underlying its genesis. Techniques to study crystallisation on and in skin and in transdermal patches are outlined. The role of the vehicle in skin delivery is emphasised. Studies which have investigated permeation from crystalline particles are described. Approaches to limit crystallisation of actives are discussed. Using supersaturation and antinuclean polymers, control of crystal size is possible; controlled release from crystals is also employed in transdermal patches. Expert Opinion: Drug crystallisation has significant implications for topical and transdermal delivery. Approaches have been developed to counteract the issue for transdermal patches but crystallisation in and on the skin for other formulations remains unresolved. Greater knowledge of residence time of excipients and their interaction with skin at the molecular level is critical in order to address the problem. This will lay the foundations for better design of topical/transdermal formulations.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Nanosuspensions combine the advantages of nanotherapeutics (e.g. increased dissolution rate and saturation solubility) with ease of commercialisation. Transformation of nanosuspensions to solid oral and inhalable dosage forms minimises the physical instability associated with their liquid state, enhances patient compliance and enables targeted oral and pulmonary drug delivery. Areas covered: This review outlines solidification methods for nanosuspensions. It includes spray and freeze drying as the most widely used techniques. Fluidised-bed coating, granulation and pelletisation are also discussed as they yield nanocrystalline formulations with more straightforward downstream processing to tablets or capsules. Spray-freeze drying, aerosol flow reactor and printing of nanosuspensions are also presented as promising alternative solidification techniques. Results regarding the solid state, in vitro dissolution and/or aerosolisation efficiency of the nanocrystalline formulations are given and combined with available in vivo data. Focus is placed on the redispersibility of the solid nanocrystalline formulations, which is a prerequisite for their clinical application. Expert opinion: A few solidified nanocrystalline products are already on the market and many more are in development. Oral and inhalable nanoparticle formulations are expected to have great potential especially in the areas of personalised medicine and delivery of high drug doses (e.g. antibiotics) to the lungs, respectively.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To conduct proof of principle studies that will enable development of noninvasive (respiratory) delivery systems for levothyroxine (T4). Methods: Preformulation (solubility, stability), formulation and biopharmaceutical (in vitro absorption, transport, gene expression) studies were conducted. Calu-3 cell line was used for permeation studies. Results: Solubility profiles of T4 were established in aqueous (PBS, HBSS, isotonic saline) and non-aqueous solvents (PEG 400, PEG 600, propylene glycol, glycerine). Transport of the compound across Calu-3 cells suggested involvement of active transport systems. This correlated with expression of thyroxine transporters (MCT8, MCT10, OATP1A2, LAT1 and LAT2) in the cell line. Diffusion characteristics showed significant absorption with no detection of T4 metabolite (triiodothyronine). Formulation studies revealed that stable formulations could be prepared using a combination of aqueous and non-aqueous solvents. Conclusions: Results of the studies indicated that T4 can be absorbed effectively from the respiratory mucosa. Factors affecting stability such as pH and temperature should be taken into account during formulation development of this compound for the respiratory route.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Hyaluronic acid (HA) has emerged as a promising applicant for the tumor-targeted delivery of various therapeutic agents. Because of its biocompatibility, biodegradability and receptor-binding properties, HA has been extensively investigated as the drug delivery carrier. In this review, recent advances in HA-based nanomedicines are discussed. Areas covered: This review focuses on HA-based nanomedicines for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent advances in HA-drug conjugates and HA-based nanoparticles for small molecular drug delivery are discussed. The bioreducible HA conjugates for small interfering ribonucleic acid delivery have been also discussed. Expert opinion: To develop a successful HA-based nanomedicine, it has to be prepared without significant deterioration of intrinsic property of HA. The chemical modification of HA with drugs or hydrophobic moieties may reduce the binding affinity of HA to the receptors. In addition, since the HA-based nanomedicines tend to accumulate in the liver after their systemic administration, new strategies to overcome this issue have to be developed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Many patients with schizophrenia exhibit difficulties in maintaining adherence to oral antipsychotics, calling for more reliable drug delivery systems. Areas covered: While non-randomized studies have indicated consistent effectiveness of long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIs) over oral counterparts to prevent negative consequences such as relapse, hospitalization and all-cause discontinuation, efficacy results from randomized controlled comparative trials have not been that impressive. The results rely heavily on the study design and the population studied. Further, LAIs are frequently used as an adjunctive to ongoing other antipsychotics or psychotropics, but not solely, in the real world. Expert opinion: To put LAI-oral comparisons into clinical context, the following information is urgently necessary: (1) How LAIs compare with each other in head-to-head comparisons? (2) How effective is it to switch among different LAIs? (3) How early in the treatment stage should LAIs be utilized? (4) How long the interval of LAI administration can be extended? (5) How LAIs compare with clozapine in head-to-head comparisons? (6) How effective are LAIs when clozapine is ineffective? (7) How effective is clozapine when LAIs are ineffective? (8) How effective is it to combine clozapine and LAIs when neither is effective alone? This paper narratively discusses these critical perspectives.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Anticoagulants have been prescribed to patients to prevent deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. However, because of several problems in anticoagulant therapy, much attention has been directed at developing an ideal anticoagulant, and numerous attempts have been made to develop new anticoagulant delivery systems in recent years. Areas covered: This review discusses the challenges associated with the recent development of anticoagulants and their delivery systems. Various delivery methods have been developed to improve the use of anticoagulants. Recent advances in anticoagulant delivery and antidote development are also discussed in the context of their current progression states. Expert opinion: There have been many different approaches to developing the delivery system of anticoagulants. One approach has been to expand the use of new oral agents and develop their antidotes. Reducing the size of heparins to use smaller heparins for delivery, and developing oral or topical heparins are also some of the approaches taken. Various physical formulations or chemical modifications are other ways that have enhanced the therapeutic potential of anticoagulant agents. On the whole, recent advances have contributed to increasing the efficacy and safety of anticoagulant clinically and have benefited the field of anticoagulant delivery.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Dosing regimens requiring multiple daily applications frequently result in poor patient compliance, especially in the treatment of chronic skin diseases. Consequently, development of sustained delivery systems for topical drugs permitting less frequent dosing is of continuing interest for dermatological therapy. Areas covered: This potential of polymeric film-forming systems (FFS), created in situ on the skin, as sustained delivery platforms for topical drug delivery is reviewed. Key formulation parameters that determine delivery efficiency are considered focussing on those that permit a drug reservoir to be established in the upper layers of the skin and/or on the skin surface from which release can be sustained over a prolonged period. The advantageous and superior cosmetic attributes of FFS (compared to conventional semi-solid formulations) that offer significantly improved patient compliance are also addressed. Expert opinion: The promise of polymeric FFS as convenient and aesthetic platforms for sustained topical drug delivery is clear. Manipulation of the formulation allows the delivery profile to be customised and optimised to take advantage of both a rapid, initial input of drug into the skin (likely due to a transient period of supersaturation) and a slower, controlled release over an extended time from the residual film created thereafter.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To develop and characterize a highly respirable dry powder inhalable formulation of voriconazole (VRZ). Methods: Powders were prepared by spray drying aqueous/alcohol solutions. Formulations were characterized in terms of particle size, morphology, thermal, moisture responses and aerosolization performance. Optimized powder was deposited onto an air-interface Calu-3 model to assess their uptake across Calu-3 lung epithelia. Optimized formulation was evaluated for stability (drug content and aerosol performance) for 3 months. Additionally, Calu-3 cell viability, lung bioavailability and tissue distribution of optimized formulation were evaluated. Results: Particle size and aerosol performance of dry powder containing 80% w/w VRZ and 20% w/w leucine was appropriate for inhalation therapy. Optimized formulation showed irregular morphology, crystalline nature, low moisture sensitivity and was stable for 3 months at room temperature. Leucine did not alter the transport kinetics of VRZ, as evaluated by air-interface Calu-3 model. Formulation was non-cytotoxic to pulmonary epithelial cells. Moreover, lung bioavailability and tissue distribution studies in murine model clearly showed that VRZ dry powder inhalable formulation has potential to enhance therapeutic efficacy at the pulmonary infection site whilst minimizing systemic exposure and related toxicity. Conclusion: This study supports the potential of inhaled dry powder VRZ for the treatment of fungal infections.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate if the conjugation of Anti-HER2-Affibody to cisplatin PEGylated liposome can efficiently enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of the targeted liposome. Methods: First, Affibody molecules were incubated with Mal-PEG2000-DSPE micelle to afford formation of a maleimide-mediated thioether coupling to the COOH-terminal cysteine of Affibody. Cisplatin-loaded liposomes composed of HSPC/ cholesterol/ mPEG2000-DSPE (56.5:38.5:5 molar ratio) (150 mM) were prepared and characterized by their physicochemical properties. Affibody-conjugated micelles were then transferred into preformed liposomes by means of post-insertion. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of Affibody-targeted (affisome) and non-targeted liposomes were tested in HER2(+) SK-BR-3, and the in vivo therapeutic activity was evaluated in TUBO breast cancer models. Results: Anti-HER2 affisome demonstrated a higher amount of platinum intracellularly, and affected HER2(+)-SK-BR-3 cell death was at lower concentrations compared to its liposome counterparts. Further, cisplatin-affisome showed greater therapeutic efficiency than non-targeted liposome in HER2(+)-TUBO models. Equally promising, the affisome-treated mice did extend the survival of animals by several days and even left one tumor-free survivor. Conclusions: Affibody-targeting endowed cisplatin liposomes with significantly enhanced, albeit modest, therapeutic activity in HER2-overexpressing tumor model, however, further values are yet to be determined to advance clinical translation of these targeted nanoparticulates.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality globally. Effective CVD preventive medications are available including statin, blood pressure-lowering and antiplatelet medications; however most people do not take these drugs long term. Fixed-dose combination pills ("polypills") have been shown, in several clinical trials, to improve adherence to these recommended medications, with corresponding improvements in risk factors such as blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol. In patients not taking all modalities of recommended CVD preventive therapies, polypill-based strategies could importantly contribute to global CVD control strategies. The largest benefits are seen in those who are under-treated at baseline, rather than those who are already taking the individual components separately: simplified step-up is more important than pill count reduction. Despite the potential benefits for patients and payers, only a few polypills are available due to market failure in the funding of research and development for affordable non-communicable disease medicines. Regulatory paradigms have focused on substitution indications among patients already taking component medications; however, this is the population that is likely to receive the least benefit from a polypill-based strategy. Greater health impact is likely if focus is given to patients who have indications for all polypill components, but currently do not receive the benefits of recommended medicines long term.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery