Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology (J Soc Integr Oncol)

Publisher: Society for Integrative Oncology, Decker Publishing

Journal description

The Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) is a non-profit, multi-disciplinary organization of professionals dedicated to studying and facilitating the cancer treatment and recovery process through the use of integrated complementary therapies. The mission of the SIO is to educate oncology professionals, patients, caregivers and relevant others about state-of-the-art integrative therapies, including their scientific validity, clinical benefits, toxicities, and limitations. SIO provides a forum for presentation, balanced discussion and peer review of evidence-based research in the discipline. The Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology (JSIO) provides oncology professionals with need-to-know information about the data-based utility of complementary therapies. A broad range of topics will be presented by renowned international experts bridging numerous disciplines involved in cancer clinical care and research initiatives. The overall aim of JSIO is to facilitate dialogue within the oncology community and help broaden the approach to cancer treatment that integrative oncology can engender.

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Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

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Website Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology website
Other titles Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology (Online), JSIO
ISSN 1715-894X
OCLC 70220384
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Decker Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Post-print
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Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to share the lessons learned in forming an interdisciplinary team that implements a team science approach to integrative medicine (IM) research. The disciplines of nursing, statistics, and engineering, along with consultants and a reflexology practitioner, formed this university-based team to conceptualize and develop a prototype robotic device for reflexology for breast cancer patients. The nurse investigator contributed the intervention background and access to the population; the statistician guided the team thinking on factors that needed to be controlled for; the engineers provided the expertise in device design and development; consultants facilitated the team's thinking in new directions; and the reflexology practitioner prescribed the protocol. We discuss the contributions and achievements of each discipline, as well as the challenges, and share the team experiences with the intent to help guide the formation of new IM teams that promote a conducive atmosphere for carrying out cutting-edge IM research and advancing the science.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: There are important safety concerns associated with dietary supplements and foods rich in phytoestrogens, especially for breast cancer patients with hormone-sensitive disease. However, no consensus has been reached concerning specific dietary items that should be avoided, and safe levels of potentially problematic foods have yet to be determined. Excellent qualitative reviews of phytoestrogens and breast cancer have been published. These list agents that contain phytoestrogens and offer general cautions. Quantitative reviews, however, are needed but not yet available. Here we review quantitative data on phytoestrogens, their interaction with estrogen receptors, their bioavailability and pharmacokinetics, and their effects on breast cancer cells and animal models. We also note foods and botanicals with substances that interact with estrogen receptors and discuss the phytoestrogens they contain. Based on current evidence, we propose recommendations for advising breast cancer patients, which may also serve as a basis for the development of clinical practice guidelines.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives/Background: Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a painful complication of the varicella zoster virus, often occurring in weakened and immunocompromised patients. As cancer patients are at high risk for developing zoster, PHN is a complication faced by patients and their caregivers. While a wide variety of therapeutic approaches have been advocated over the years, most have not been found to be effective. Patients/Methods: This retrospective series discusses the successful treatment of 13 patients-including seven cancer patients-with PHN, using acupuncture. Patients were treated by a single practitioner in a conventional community pain practice. Needling was performed along the affected dermatome. Therapy occurred twice-weekly for 1-2 weeks, then less frequently until pain relief was optimized. Results: Patients received a median of 7 treatments (range 4-11). Median baseline allodynia levels were reduced from 7/10 (range 5 to 9) to zero (range 0 to 6), intermittent shooting pain from 9/10 (range 7 to 10) to 1/10 (range 0 to 6). 7 of 10 patients (70%) were able to be weaned off pain medications. Conclusions: These data support acupuncture as an intriguing treatment option for patients suffering from PHN. It is safe for immunocompromised patients and effective in reducing PHN pain with lasting results.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the impact of random assignment to music versus usual care on anxiety, perceived pain level and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing bone marrow biopsies. Patients were randomized to music or usual care after completing a baseline questionnaire. All patients completed a post-procedure questionnaire. Study participants (N=59) had a mean age of 50.9 years (SD = 13.9; range 22-78). Post-procedure state anxiety (STAI) and pain rating (VAS) were not significantly different between groups (STAI p=0.766; VAS p=0.771). However, patient satisfaction with music was high; 66% of these patients said they very much preferred to listen to music at a future biopsy. While there were no significant group differences for the music intervention compared to standard of care for anxiety or perceived pain, additional feedback indicated that patients found the music intervention beneficial and requested use of music during future procedures.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Physical (ie, pain, nausea, dry mouth) and psychoemotional (ie, anxiousness, fatigue, sleep disturbances) symptoms related to cancer and treatment are commonly encountered in patients seen in the oncology clinic. Acupuncture has been reported to be a useful therapeutic modality in the treatment of many of these symptoms. Classically, acupuncture involves the use of needles to establish homeostasis of an internal energy force (called "qi") throughout the body. Many recently published studies have demonstrated that "cold" lasers can be an effective, noninvasive alternative (to needles) for stimulating acupuncture points. This may be advantageous for treating patients who, as a consequence of the bone marrow suppression effects of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, are potentially at an increased risk of infections and bleeding. This Institutional Review Board-approved, retrospective analysis evaluates the feasibility and results of a 2-week regimen of laser acupuncture for the treatment of various symptoms encountered in oncology patients. To obtain an individualized acupuncture point prescription, a standardized, nonvalidated diagnostic questionnaire was administered to all patients prior to their initial acupuncture consultation. Patients were treated using a multidiode laser unit (10 separate 5 mW diodes, 808 nm), which simultaneously stimulates 10 body acupuncture points. Each acupuncture point received 9.9 J (energy density 315 J/cm 2) delivered over a 33-minute treatment session. Twenty-seven patients completed the 2-week regimen and recorded their symptoms (using the validated Memorial Symptom Assessment Score-Short Form) before their first acupuncture session and after their last acupuncture session. Significant mean improvements were noted in multiple symptom domains: global distress index, physical symptom distress score, and psychologic symptom distress score were 44.3% (p <.001), 45.1% (p <.001), and 52.0% (p =.002), respectively. Our clinic staff reported minimal impact to workflow or productivity when implementing this service in the department. Laser acupuncture may be an effective and convenient therapeutic modality for helping to alleviate a variety of untoward symptoms experienced by our oncology patients. Based on the encouraging findings of this retrospective analysis, prospective randomized controlled studies, with extended follow-up, are encouraged.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the scientific evidence on reishi, including expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetics/dynamics, interactions, adverse effects, toxicology, and dosing. This review serves as a clinical support tool. Electronic searches were conducted in 10 databases, 20 additional journals (not indexed in common databases), and bibliographies from 50 selected secondary references. No restrictions were placed on language or quality of publications. All literature collected pertained to efficacy in humans, dosing, precautions, adverse effects, use in pregnancy/lactation, interactions, alteration of laboratory assays, and mechanisms of action. Standardized inclusion/exclusion criteria are used for selection. Grades were assigned using an evidence-based grading rationale. There was a lack of systematic study on the safety and effectiveness of reishi in humans. However, based on popular use and supportive scientific data, three indications are discussed in this review: cancer, diabetes, and immune stimulation. Despite the lack of scientific evidence, reishi mushroom remains a popular agent in commercial products. Future randomized controlled trials are warranted.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: In response to rising interests from patients, many comprehensive cancer centers now offer an integrative model of care which includes the provision of complementary medicine. Yoga is one such intervention that has been used in children. We performed an Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved chart review of pediatric hematology-oncology patients who received yoga. Patients with sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain crises or cancer were offered bedside yoga by a certified yoga instructor. Pain before and after yoga was reported using the 10-point Wong-Baker FACES pain scale. Anxiety before and after yoga was assessed with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Qualitative patient quotes were extracted from the yoga therapist's notes. Twenty patient's charts were reviewed, 50% were male. The mean age was 18 years, (range 11-26 years.) Most common diagnoses were sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain crises (45%), and sarcoma (40%.) The mean reduction in pain score was 0.94 (SD ± 1.68), p = .005, and the mean reduction in anxiety T-score was 9.62 (SD ± 6.74), p = .0001. Patient quotes suggest that yoga was beneficial, especially for relaxation. Literature review offers preliminary support for the use of yoga for anxiety in children. Our data suggest that further research on yoga as an effective intervention for pediatric hematology-oncology patients for pain and anxiety is needed.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: As complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers seek integration into health care systems and insurance coverage, physicians and health systems need to know how insured patients who use CAM providers differ in their participation in cancer screening modalities such as mammography. This study analyzed insurance claims in Washington State for 44,270 women from 2003 and 2004. Women seeing CAM providers were more likely to receive mammography (76.7%) than non-CAM users (67.8%). Seeing a conventional primary care provider was, however, the single most important factor associated with receipt of a mammogram; almost 75% of such women received a mammogram. Less than half of the women using CAM in the absence of a conventional primary care provider received a mammogram. Even fewer (29.1%) of the women who used neither a conventional primary care provider nor a CAM care provider received a mammogram. Adjustments for demographic and other predictors did not change these conclusions. Although women seeing CAM providers were more likely than non-CAM users to receive recommended screening, women using CAM providers without the concomitant use of conventional primary care providers were screened at low rates. Women who saw neither a CAM nor a conventional primary care provider used screening even less often.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Although breast cancer survivors are known to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) extensively, little is known about if and how they would prefer these services to be integrated into academic cancer centers. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among women with early-stage breast cancer at a large urban university hospital. Preferences for CAM integration were evaluated using a 5-point Likert-like scale, and ratings of " important" or "very important" were interpreted as endorsement. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with preferences for integration. Among 300 participants, 62% reported CAM use since their cancer diagnosis. Endorsement for CAM interventions was high: 58% for providing acupuncture or massage in the cancer center, 49% for teaching classes on mind-body-based exercises such a yoga or tai chi, 71% for developing a CAM provider network in the community, 70% for a CAM educational brochure, and 74% for providing information about CAM on the cancer center Web site. In multivariate models, younger age and previous CAM use were associated with preference for CAM integration into the cancer center (p < .01). Many breast cancer survivors have used CAM since diagnosis and prefer integrating CAM into an academic cancer center; however, preferences appear to be influenced by age and prior CAM experience.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to characterize the hepatic metabolism of noni juice, specifically involving the potential for drug interactions with selected chemotherapy agents, and to determine the safety and impact of antitumor activity. High-throughput cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) metabolism inhibition experiments were conducted in vitro evaluating CYP450 3A4, 2C8, 2C9, and 2D6 followed by an evaluation of noni juice as a substrate of these isoenzymes. An ex vivo model of human hepatocytes was used to evaluate the induction potential of noni juice. Growth inhibition assays were performed to determine the cytotoxic activity of noni juice alone and in combination with selected chemotherapy. Noni juice is a substrate of 3A4 and 2C8. The CYP450 assays indicated that noni juice does not inhibit CYP450; however, it is a potential inducer of 3A4, 2C8/2C9, and 2D6. In the cancer cell lines, noni juice alone did not exert cytotoxic effects, and decreased activity in combination with selected chemotherapy was observed compared to chemotherapy agent alone. Noni juice has the potential induction of CYP450 pathways and may interact with chemotherapy agents. In addition, in vitro noni juice decreased the cytotoxic activity of selected chemotherapy agents. These data suggest that noni juice may not be safe to recommend to patients receiving chemotherapy.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: A recent review in the Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology urged caution about using supplements with cancer but did not consider the extensive literature on vitamin D and cancer. The ultraviolet B-vitamin D-cancer hypothesis has progressed substantially since its introduction in 1980. Many ecologic, observational, and cross-sectional studies and one randomized controlled trial have evaluated the hypothesis. There is now good to excellent evidence that vitamin D reduces the risk of 16 types of cancer: bladder, breast, colon, endometrial, esophageal, gallbladder, gastric, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate, rectal, renal, and vulvar cancer and Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanisms whereby vitamin D reduces the risk of cancer incidence and death include effects on cellular differentiation and proliferation, calcium absorption and metabolism, angiogenesis, and metastasis, as well as the integrity of the epithelium. For cancer prevention, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 40 to 60 ng/mL are indicated. There are observational studies reporting that those with higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at the time of cancer diagnosis had longer cancer-specific and all-cause survival rates for breast and colorectal cancer and lymphoma. Such evidence suggests that those diagnosed with cancer should have serum levels brought up to the optimal level. Vitamin D confers many other health benefits, including reduced risk of cardiovascular and infectious diseases.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: One of the main concerns that oncologists have in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is the possibility of the negative interactions of nutritional supplements with chemotherapy, causing reduced effectiveness of the cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to search commonly used databases and look for actual research data (in vitro, in vivo, or human studies) that document any interactions (positive or negative) of nutritional supplements with docetaxel, a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug. The search revealed 24 articles that document interaction with docetaxel and certain nutritional supplements such as L -glutamine, fish oil, vitamin D, garlic, black cohosh, and others. Twenty-two of the studies documented some benefit in the combined use in terms of improving the apoptotic and cytotoxic effects of docetaxel on the tumors as well as reducting the toxicity and side effects involved in the use of docetaxel. From the current search, it seems as if more evidence supports the combined use of certain nutritional supplements with docetaxel in terms of beneficial effects. On the other hand, one needs to be cautious as well as certain supplements can have a negative effect, such as reducing the effectiveness of the drug. There is a dire need to further evaluate the negative and positive interactions of nutritional supplements and chemotherapeutic drugs.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the effects of yoga on quality of life (QOL) and psychosocial outcomes in women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. Sixty-one women were randomly assigned to either a yoga or a wait-list group. Yoga classes were taught biweekly during the 6 weeks of radiotherapy. Participants completed measures of QOL, fatigue, benefit finding (finding meaning in the cancer experience), intrusive thoughts, sleep disturbances, depressive symptoms, and anxiety before radiotherapy and then again 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the end of radiotherapy. General linear model analyses revealed that compared to the control group, the yoga group reported significantly better general health perception (p = .005) and physical functioning scores (p = .04) 1 week postradiotherapy; higher levels of intrusive thoughts 1 month postradiotherapy (p = .01); and greater benefit finding 3 months postradiotherapy (p = .01). There were no other group differences in other QOL subscales for fatigue, depression, or sleep scores. Exploratory analyses indicated that intrusive thoughts 1 month after radiotherapy were significantly positively correlated with benefit finding 3 months after radiotherapy (r = .36, p = .011). Our results indicated that the yoga program was associated with statistically and clinically significant improvements in aspects of QOL.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Current evidence indicates that acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) can provide sustained benefit for established radiation-induced xerostomia (RIX) symptoms. This is further being evaluated by comparing it with standard treatment (pilocarpine) in a randomized controlled trial. This report studies the potential effectiveness of xerostomia prevention using ALTENS delivered concomitantly with radiotherapy administered to head and neck cancer patients. Sixty patients were randomized to either the treatment group (n = 30) that received ALTENS daily with radiotherapy or the control group (n = 26) that had standard mouth care only. Stimulated and basal unstimulated whole saliva production (WSP) plus RIX symptoms visual analogue score (RIXVAS) were assessed at specific time points. Generalized linear models and generalized estimating equations were used for analysis. RIXVAS at 3 months follow-up after therapy completion was used as the primary study endpoint. The mean RIXVAS for the ALTENS intervention at 3 months was 39.8, which was not significantly different from the control arm value of 40.5. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups for their mean RIXVAS and WSP at all assessment time points. In conclusion, there was no significant difference in mean WSP and RIXVAS between the two groups, so ALTENS is not recommended as a prophylactic intervention.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology
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    Preview · Article · Mar 2010 · Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology