Clinical and Translational Oncology (CLIN TRANSL ONCOL)

Publisher: Federación de Sociedades Españolas de Oncología; Instituto Nacional de Cancerología de México, Springer Verlag

Journal description

Clinical and Translational Oncology is an international journal devoted to fostering interaction between experimental and clinical oncology. It covers all aspects of research on cancer, from the more basic discoveries dealing with both cell and molecular biology of tumour cells, to the most advanced clinical assays of conventional and new drugs. In addition, the journal has a strong commitment to facilitating the transfer of knowledge from the basic laboratory to the clinical practice, with the publication of educational series devoted to closing the gap between molecular and clinical oncologists. Molecular biology of tumours, identification of new targets for cancer therapy, and new technologies for research and treatment of cancer are the major themes covered by the educational series. Full research articles on a broad spectrum of subjects, including the molecular and cellular bases of disease, aetiology, pathophysiology, pathology, epidemiology, clinical features, and the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer, will be considered for publication. Case reports describing unusual clinical cases or examples of unique reports dedicated to translational research will also be within the scope of the journal.

Current impact factor: 2.08

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.077
2013 Impact Factor 1.6
2012 Impact Factor 1.276
2011 Impact Factor 1.327
2010 Impact Factor 1.254
2009 Impact Factor 1.146

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.60
Cited half-life 3.60
Immediacy index 0.46
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.41
Website Clinical and Translational Oncology website
Other titles Clinical & translational oncology (Online), Clinical and translational oncology
ISSN 1699-048X
OCLC 163567079
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • J. Boceta · A. De la Torre · D. Samper · M. Farto · R. Sánchez-de la Rosa

    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
  • J. Cassinello · J. Carballido Rodríguez · L. Antón Aparicio

    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
  • M. Caro · A. Font · S. Comas · M. Viciano · J. Remon · P. Céliz · J. Robles · E. Musulén · M. J. Sendrós · E. Mesalles · J. A. Jiménez · J. Boix · A. Arellano · J. Fernández-Llamazares

    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
  • C. N. Kent · I. K. Guttilla Reed

    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between the immune system and cancer growth and aggravation has been discussed over a century. A number of molecules have been shown to participate in this process. CD47, a normal universally expressed member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, plays multiple functions in immune system. Researches demonstrated that CD47 was also highly expressed on the surface of tumor cells as well as cancer stem cells (CSCs). Whether the highly expressed CD47 was associated with tumor growth, metastasis, recurrence, or drug resistance has become the hotspot. Besides the roles of CD47 in tumor immunoregulation, the monoclonal antibodies targeting CD47 used in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and bladder CSCs were reported, which shed new light on tumor treatment. CSCs have been recognized as the root of tumor drug resistance and recurrence. Whether CD47 on CSCs could serve as a potential target for future anti-cancer treatment forms the focus of our review. Here we highlight the potential roles of CD47 in immune system, and discuss the promising therapeutic application of anti-CD47 antibodies for eliminating tumor cells.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Melanoma was one of the translational cancer examples in clinic, including target therapy related to specific biomarkers impacting in the outcome of melanoma patients. Melanomagenesis involved a wide variety of mutations during his evolution; many of these mutated proteins have a kinase activity. One of the most cited proteins in melanoma is BRAF (about 50–60 % of melanomas harbors activating BRAF mutations), for these the most common is a substitution of valine to glutamic acid at codon 600 (p.V600E). Therefore, the precise identification of this underlying somatic mutation is essential; knowing the translational implications has opened a wide view of melanoma biology and therapy.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Ipilimumab has been approved in patients with advanced melanoma by different regulatory bodies worldwide, but its use in clinical practice is not fully consistent among oncologists. We have surveyed a representative sample of Spanish medical oncologists on issues related to the use of ipilimumab. Materials and methods The survey was based on the Delphi method, where experts respond anonymously to two rounds of a questionnaire. Questionnaire consisted of 42 statements divided among the following eight categories: Pathology and Diagnosis; Patterns of Response; Parameters affecting Treatment Selection; Patient Profile; Sequencing of Treatment; Definition of Long-Term Survivors; Quality of Life; Concept of Immuno-oncology. The experts were asked to rate each statement on a scale of 1–9, where 1 meant “completely disagree” and 9 meant “completely agree”. Results Thirty-three oncologists responded to both rounds of the survey (62.3 % of total surveyed). On issues related to pathology and diagnosis, patterns of response, and immuno-oncology, the specialists reached a high level of consensus. There was also a high level of agreement, albeit without consensus on assessment of BRAF mutations before deciding on treatment with ipilimumab. However, there was a lower level of agreement on sequencing treatment with BRAF inhibitors and ipilimumab, on predictive factors, on the use of corticosteroids, and on patient quality of life. Conclusions The disparity in many of these topics suggests that oncologists need more information on certain aspects of ipilimumab treatment. We need to define generally accepted algorithms of treatment, especially with regard to issues that were shown to be controversial or unclear.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Inconsistent data exist on long-term visual outcomes in survivors of retinoblastoma. No studies have been reported on role of ocular coherence tomography (OCT) in predicting visual acuity. We assessed visual acuity in patients with retinoblastoma treated at our center in whom affected eyes were preserved. Methods Patients who had completed a 2-year follow-up and were more than 5 years of age at assessment were included. Clinical data were obtained from database and factors predicting visual acuity were analyzed. OCT was performed in these patients to assess central macular thickness (CMT). Results Visual outcomes were assessed in 45 eyes of 43 patients, of which 38 (88 %) had bilateral retinoblastoma. The median age at diagnosis was 12 months. Sixty percent (27/45) had International classification of retinoblastoma group C or D disease with 40 % eyes showing macular lesions. The far visual acuity was better than 6/12 in 53 % (24/45), 6/12 to 6/60 in 40 % (18/45) and 6/60 in 7 % (6/60). Macular location and International classification of retinoblastoma predicted poor vision (p = 0.06 and 0.07, respectively). CMT was less than 200 μm in 3 of 36 eyes (8 %) and 1 eye showed epiretinal membrane. Radiotherapy was associated with foveal thinning (p = 0.003). Two of 3 eyes with foveal thinning had a vision of 6/60. Conclusions Good visual outcomes were observed in half of retinoblastoma patients treated with eye preservation. Macular location and International classification of retinoblastoma group C and D predicted poor visual acuity, while previous radiotherapy predicted foveal thinning, which was associated with poor visual acuity.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose To report treatment outcomes in a cohort of extreme-risk prostate cancer patients and identify a subgroup of patients with worse prognosis. Materials and methods Extreme-risk prostate cancer patients were defined as patients with at least one extreme-risk factor: stage cT3b–cT4, Gleason score 9–10 or PSA > 50 ng/ml; or patients with 2 or more high-risk factors: stage cT2c–cT3a, Gleason 8 and PSA > 20 ng/ml. Overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), clinical-free survival (CFS), and biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED) survival are the four outcomes of interest in a population of 1341 patients. Results With a median follow-up of 71.5 months, 5- and 10-year bNED survival, CFS, CSS and OS for the entire cohort were 77.1 % and 57.0, 89.2 and 78.9 %, 97.4 and 93.6 %, and 92.0 and 71.3 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, PSA and clinical stage were associated with bNED survival. PSA and Gleason score predicted for CFS, whereas only Gleason score predicted for OS. When a simplified model was performed using the “number of risk factors” variable, this model provided the best distinction between patients with ≥2 extreme-risk factors and patients with 2 high-risk factors, showing a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.737 (p = 0.0003) for bNED survival, HR 1.743 (p = 0.0448) for OS and an HR of 3.963 (p = 0.0039) for the CSS endpoint. Conclusions Patients presenting at diagnosis with two extreme-risk criteria have almost fourfold higher risk for prostate cancer mortality. Such patients should be considered for more aggressive multimodal treatments.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose In the present study we compared three different Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment delivery techniques in terms of treatment time (TT) and their relation with intrafraction variation (IFV). Besides that, we analyzed if different clinical factors could have an influence on IFV. Finally, we appreciated the soundness of our margins. Materials and methods Forty-five patients undergoing SBRT for stage I lung cancer or lung metastases up to 5 cm were included in the study. All underwent 4DCT scan to create an internal target volume (ITV) and a 5 mm margin was added to establish the planning target volume (PTV). Cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) were acquired before and after each treatment to quantify the IFV. Three different treatment delivery techniques were employed: fixed fields (FF), dynamically collimated arcs (AA) or a combination of both (FA). We studied if TT was different among these modalities of SBRT and whether TT and IFV were correlated. Clinical data related to patients and tumors were recorded as potential influential factors over the IFV. Results A total of 52 lesions and 147 fractions were analyzed. Mean IFV for x-, y- and z-axis were 1 ± 1.16 mm, 1.29 ± 1.38 mm and 1.17 ± 1.08 mm, respectively. Displacements were encompassed by the 5 mm margin in 96.1 % of fractions. TT was significantly longer in FF therapy (24.76 ± 5.4 min), when compared with AA (15.30 ± 3.68 min) or FA (17.79 ± 3.52 min) (p < 0.001). Unexpectedly, IFV did not change significantly between them (p = 0.471). Age (p = 0.003) and left vs. right location (p = 0.005) were related to 3D shift ≥2 mm. In the multivariate analysis only age showed a significant impact on the IFV (OR = 1.07, p = 0.007). Conclusions The choice of AA, FF or FA does not impact on IFV although FF treatment takes significantly longer treatment time. Our immobilization device offers enough accuracy and the 5 mm margin may be considered acceptable as it accounts for more than 95 % of tumor shifts. Age is the only clinical factor that influenced IFV significantly in our analysis.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose hENT1 is a transmembrane protein which acts as a nucleoside transporter and is the main mediator of Gemcitabine (GEM) uptake into human cells. In this retrospective study we compared GEM versus FOLFIRINOX in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer in which hENT1 evaluation was available. Methods 149 patients affected by unresectable metastatic pancreatic cancer, treated in our institution from 2009 to 2013, have been screened for inclusion in this retrospective study. Seventy patients, treated with GEM or FOLFIRINOX in first-line therapy, fulfilled clinical inclusion criteria for survival analysis. Thirty-one patients were available and contained sufficient quality/quantity RNA for evaluation of hENT1 expression by RT-PCR. The primary endpoint was OS and the secondary endpoint was PFS. Results The survival analysis, carried out on 70 patients regardless of hENT1 expression, showed a statistically longer OS and PFS in the group treated with FOLFIRINOX compared to GEM. Within the exploratory analysis, which included 31 patients, no differences were found in hENT1 positive patients treated with FOLFIRINOX compared to GEM in terms of OS (8.5 vs 7 months, HR: 0.89; 95 % CI 0.3–2.5; p = 0.8) and PFS (5.5 vs 5 months, HR: 0.8, 95 % CI 0.2–2.2; p = 0.61). GEM-treated hENT1 positive patients showed a statistically significant improvement both of OS (8 vs 2 months; p = 0.0012) and PFS (5 vs 1 months; p = 0.0004) in comparison to GEM-treated hENT1 negative patients. Conclusions In our exploratory analysis GEM seems as effective as FOLFIRINOX in terms of survival with a better safety profile in hENT1 positive metastatic pancreatic cancer.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Data on prognostic factors in patients with metastatic osteosarcoma treated with uniform chemotherapy protocol are lacking. The objective of this study was to analyze demographic data, treatment outcome and prognostic factors for patients with metastatic osteosarcoma at our center treated with a uniform chemotherapy protocol without high dose methotrexate. Methods This is a single-institutional data review of patients treated between June 2003 and December 2012 with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, local site surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and metastasectomy at completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. Results 102 patients of metastatic osteosarcoma were treated with a median age of 18 years (range 8–48 years), male to female ratio of 3.3:1 and median symptom duration of 4 months. EFS and OS at 5 years were 12.7 ± 0.1 and 28.1 ± 0.1 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (p < 0.001) and number of metastasis >3 (p = 0.04) were predictive of lower EFS, whereas elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.01), number of metastasis >3 (p = 0.05), and margin positivity (p < 0.001) were predictive of lower OS. Conclusions This is the largest data on metastatic osteosarcoma treated with a uniform chemotherapy protocol without high dose methotrexate. The data showed prognostic factors similar to what have been observed previously such as elevated serum alkaline phosphatase and >3 metastatic lesions in lung predicting inferior outcome. Notably our survival was comparable to data from other studies despite our practice of delaying metastasectomy to completion of chemotherapy rather than performing the same along with local site surgery.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Multidisciplinary tumour boards (MDTs) are conducted worldwide for the management of patients with cancer, and they deliver a higher standard of care by simultaneously involving different specialists in diagnosis and treatment planning. However, information of paediatric MDTs functioning is scarce. A pilot study was conducted in Spain in the frame of the European Expert Paediatric Oncology Reference Network for Diagnostics and Treatment (ExPO-r-Net). Methods A specific questionnaire was designed regarding various features of MDT practice. Data collected included information on the centres and the team, infrastructure for meetings, MDT organization/logistics and clinical decision-making. The survey was distributed to all Paediatric Oncology Units that register patients in the Spanish Registry of Childhood Tumours (RETI-SEHOP). Results 32 out of 43 contacted centres responded the questionnaire (74 % response rate; 88 % response rate for centres with >25 new patients/year). All units with >25 new patients/year have a dedicated Paediatric MDT compared to 76 % of units with ≤25 new patients/year. MDTs should be improved at institutional level by clear protected time in service planning for all specialists involved, incentives for attendance and attendance registration. Clinical decision-making process and follow-up of recommendation adherence should be assessed and potential legal responsibilities for physicians participating in Tumour Board defined. Network collaboration through virtual MDTs, using available videoconferencing tools, is an opportunity to share expertise among centres.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To ascertain the level of agreement and achieve a consensus among cancer pain specialists in Spain with regard to the optimal definition, diagnosis, and management of breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP). Design Two-round Delphi methodology survey (February–May 2013) using seven-point Likert scales (ranging from 1 “strongly disagree” to 7 “strongly agree”) was carried out. Mean scores >5 or <3 indicated, respectively, agreement or disagreement. Scores from 3 to 5 indicated no consensus. Results A total of 126 experienced specialists were surveyed. Response rates were 68 % in round 1 and 90 % in round 2. Agreement (mean Likert score) was strongest for the proposed BTcP definition (6.6), the use of oral (6.1), and intranasal (6.0) transmucosal fentanyl, the need for early assessment after BTcP treatment initiation, and the need to improve staff knowledge of BTcP. Broad agreement was also reached regarding the need to systematically screen all cancer patients for BTcP (5.9). Most respondents (82 %) considered strong opioids to be appropriate treatment. In contrast, no consensus was reached regarding strong opioid treatment for baseline pain as a prerequisite for BTcP diagnosis. Conclusions Consensus was strong for most treatment, and diagnostic aspects were evaluated in the study. However, several important issues remain unresolved, particularly whether the diagnostic criteria must include strong opioids for background pain. Nurses’ awareness and understanding of BTcP was considered insufficient, and more training is needed in this area. Overall, agreement among specialists was good, but more work is needed to better define the optimal diagnostic features and treatments for this condition.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose To assess kinetics of plasmatic cytokines during radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced and early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods This prospective study was conducted on 15 early-stage NSCLC underwent to extreme hypofractionated regimen (52 Gy in 8 fractions) with stereotactic body RT (SBRT), and 13 locally advanced NSCLC underwent to radical moderated hypofractionated regimen (60 Gy in 25 fractions) with intensity modulated RT (IMRT). For patients undergoing SBRT, peripheral blood samples were collected on the first day of SBRT (TFd), the last day (TLd) and 45 days (T45d) after the end of SBRT. For patients undergoing IMRT, blood samples were collected at: TFd, 2 weeks (T2w), 4 weeks (T4w), TLd, and T45d. The following cytokines were measured: IL-1, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17A, EGF, FGF-2, INF-γ, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, TGF-α, TNF-α, and VEGF. Cytokine levels measured in different RT time and compared. Results No difference in baseline levels of cytokines was documented between patient radiation approaches (except for MIP-1α). For SBRT patients, a mean reduction of IL-10 and IL-17 plasma level was documented between TLd and TFd, respectively (p < 0.05). For IMRT patients, a statistically significant (p < 0.05) mean plasma level reduction was documented between T4w and TFd for all the following cytokines: IL-1, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-12, FGF-2, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, TGF-α, TNF-α, VEGF. Conclusions SBRT and IMRT induce different plasmatic cytokine changes in NSCLC patients, supporting hypothesis that RT regimes of dose schedules and techniques have different impacts on the host immune response.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: The transcription factor Snail1 leads to the epithelial–mesenchymal transition by repressing the adherent and tight junctions in epithelial cells. This process is related to an increase of cell migratory and mesenchymal properties during both embryonic development and tumor progression. Although Snail1 expression is very limited in adult animals, emerging evidence has placed Snail at the forefront of medical science. As a transcriptional repressor, Snail1 confers cancer stem cell-like traits on tumor cells and promotes drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. In this review, we summarize recent reports that suggest the pro-tumorigenic roles of Snail1 expression in tumor stroma. The crosstalk between tumor and stromal cells mediated by Snail1 regulates paracrine communication, pro-tumorigenic abilities of cancer cells, extracellular matrix characteristics and mesenchymal differentiation in cancer stem cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts. Therefore, understanding the regulation and functional roles of Snail1 in the tumor microenvironment will provide us with new therapies for treating metastatic disease.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinical and Translational Oncology