Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery

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ISSN 1682-5055

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to illuminate beliefs in relation to health and illness expressed by older Africans within the context of a society in transition – South Africa. An ethnographic research approach influenced by the interpretive phenomenological tradition was selected to gain an understanding of the participants’ experiences. A focused ethnographic design was employed, using group and individual in-depth interviews and participant observations. Sixteen elderly persons (ten females and six males) from Hammanskraal, a rural area north of Pretoria were involved in the research. The findings illuminate a world understanding, where body and mind are inseparable and relationships provide the foundation for improving and maintaining health and being cured from illness. The ongoing transition that the elderly in South Africa experience influences health and illness beliefs, with a need to adapt to existing parallel health care systems, Western biomedicine and African traditional medicine. As the study draws attention to the importance of caring for the elderly to be contextualised, it is recommended that the care of the elderly be applied to the unique needs of the individual involved. Failure to do so may otherwise have severe consequences such as an apparent high risk of developing stereotypes, which can lead to cultural misunderstandings, prejudice and discrimination.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery
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    ABSTRACT: The scholarship of nursing depends on the research culture in institutions. Not all higher education institutions globally expect from diploma prepared nurses to be research trained, but it is expected in the South African and African context. Globalisation and the migration of degree and diploma prepared nurses, should sensitize the global nursing community about the challenges faced when nursing colleges or learning centres, offering diploma programmes, become part of the higher education sphere and need to contribute to the scholarship of discovery. This article reports on strategies that could be implemented in higher education institutions, such as colleges, to enhance the research culture. A qualitative research design was used and data gathered through a nominal group technique with 12 students from different institutions as well as reflection reports from five nurse educators involved in research training and supervision. Participants indicated that the most important aspect that needed to be addressed in nursing education was improved research knowledge for students, nurse educators and research supervisors. Institutions where nurse educators do not have master's degrees should implement strategies to support students and educators in enhancing their research capacities and skills in order to improve the institution's research culture. University nursing schools, which have research mentors, should become role models/mentors to support enhancing a research culture in nursing colleges in South Africa and Africa.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery
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    ABSTRACT: It is important for nurses to have positive attitudes towards patient care if good quality care is to be provided. This study explored nurses' attitudes towards providing care to patients in one rural district hospital in KwaZulu-Natal from the perspective of the nurses themselves, and from the patients' perspective. We conducted an explorative qualitative study. Thirteen focus group discussions were conducted with professional/enrolled nurses, enrolled nurse assistants and patients. Discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach. While some nurses were passionate about nursing for altruistic reasons, many nurses said they actively disliked nursing. Reasons were staff shortages, high patient loads, absenteeism, and poor interpersonal communication. Both nurses and patients reported incidences of poor patient care and even willful neglect of patients' basic care. Nurses blamed sub-standard nursing care on the attitudes of patients or patients' relatives, as well as on lack of management support. Patients described both positive and negative experiences of nursing care received. Poor attitudes of nurses, resulting in poor patient care, could severely undermine the ability of the health system to provide quality care and improve outcomes for patients. It is recommended that all hospitals assess nurses' attitudes regularly to ensure that patient care is not compromised.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery
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    ABSTRACT: This study explored the factors contributing to relapse of mental health care users (MHCUs) treated for substance-induced psychotic disorder in a public psychiatric hospital in Gauteng, South Africa. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research design was followed. The study was conducted at the outpatient department of the hospital. Participants were selected purposefully from MHCUs visiting the outpatient department for follow-up. Ten semistructured interviews were used to collect data until data saturation occurred. The transcribed interviews and field notes were analysed using Tesch's method of qualitative data analysis. The researcher and an independent coder reached consensus on the categories, sub-categories and themes. Trustworthiness was ensured through application of the strategies of dependability, transferability, conformability, credibility and authenticity. The findings explicated the factors contributing to relapse of MHCUs treated for substanceinduced psychotic disorder in a psychiatric hospital. These factors included psychological, physical and social factors. Recommendations were provided for psychiatric nurses in terms of therapeutic programme planning and involvement of the community and family in the management of MHCUs treated for substance-induced psychotic disorder.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery
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    ABSTRACT: The School of Nursing at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) and the Directorate of Nursing Services in the Western Cape Department of Health undertook a collaborative project to strengthen the clinical teaching skills of professional nurses in the province. A preceptorship training programme was developed by the school and professional nurses from public hospitals and higher education institutions attended the training. It was, however, unclear whether they perceived a change in clinical teaching skills following the training. The purpose of this research was to explore the trained nurse preceptors' perceptions of the preceptorship training programme offered by UWC. The objectives were to compile a profile of the participants and to describe their perceived changes in knowledge, skills and attitudes as a result of the training. A qualitative approach was used to carry out an exploratory, descriptive and contextual study. An abstraction tool was used to compile profiles of the participants from records. Purposive sampling was used to select participants from tertiary, regional and district hospitals for three focus group discussions. The data showed that the 80 trained preceptors would be able to precept 1 600 students in the province. Five themes emerged from the qualitative data, relating to the change in knowledge about clinical teaching; change in clinical teaching skills; change in attitude; self-awareness; and training challenges. It is recommended that the preceptorship training programme remains a collaborative project.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Africa Journal of Nursing and Midwifery