Neurodegenerative Diseases

Publisher: Karger

Journal description

Neurodegenerative Diseases is a bimonthly, multidisciplinary journal for the publication of advances in the understanding of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington disease and related neurological and psychiatric disorders. Neurodegenerative Diseases publishes results from basic and clinical scientific research programs designed to better understand the normal functions of genes and proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases, to characterize their role in pathogenic disease mechanisms, to model their functions in animals and to explore their roles in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. It is our firm belief that successful strategies for novel treatments of neurodegenerative diseases will emerge from the intelligent integration of basic neurobiology with clinical sciences. Therefore, Neurodegenerative Diseases will accept high-quality papers from a broad spectrum of scientific research areas ranging from molecular and cell biology to neuroscience, pharmacology, genetics and the clinical sciences.

Current impact factor: 3.51

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 3.511
2013 Impact Factor 3.454
2012 Impact Factor 3.41
2011 Impact Factor 3.056
2010 Impact Factor 3.791
2009 Impact Factor 3.496
2008 Impact Factor 2.989

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.12
Cited half-life 4.00
Immediacy index 0.80
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.92
Website Neurodegenerative Diseases website
Other titles Neuro-degenerative diseases
ISSN 1660-2862
OCLC 260107464
Material type Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Karger

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On author's server or institutional server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background and objectives: Gastrointestinal dysfunction is a common non motor symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the potential association between vitamin D and gastroparesis in PD has not been previously investigated. The aim of this study was to compare vitamin D levels between drug-naive de novo PD patients with normal gastric emptying and those with delayed gastric emptying. Methods: Fifty-one patients with drug-naive de novo PD and 20 age-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Gastric emptying time (GET) was assessed by scintigraphy, and gastric emptying half-time (T1/2) was determined. The PD patients were divided into a delayed-GET group and a normal-GET group. Results: The serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels were decreased in the delayed-GET group compared with the normal-GET and control groups (11.59 ± 4.90 vs. 19.43 ± 6.91 and 32.69 ± 4.93, respectively, p < 0.01). In the multivariate model, the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 level was independently associated with delayed gastric emptying in PD patients. Conclusions: Vitamin D status may be an independent factor for gastric dysmotility in PD. Although the underlying mechanism remains to be characterized, vitamin D status may play a role in the pathogenesis of delayed gastric emptying in drug-naive PD.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background: There is growing evidence for extramotor dysfunction (EMd) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with a reported prevalence of up to 52%. Objective: In the present study, we explore the clinical utility of a brief neuropsychological battery for the investigation of cognitive, behavioral, and language deficits in patients with ALS. Methods: Thirty-four consecutive ALS patients aged 44-89 years were tested with a brief neuropsychological battery, including executive, behavioral, and language measures. Patients were initially classified as EMd or non-EMd based on their scores on the frontal assessment battery (FAB). Results: Between-group comparisons revealed significant differences in all measures (p < 0.01). Discriminant analysis resulted in a single canonical function, with all tests serving as significant predictors. This function agreed with the FAB in 13 of 17 patients screened as EMd and identified extramotor deficits in 2 additional patients. Overall sensitivity and specificity estimates against FAB were 88.2%. Conclusions: We stress the importance of discriminant function analysis in clinical neuropsychological assessment and argue that the proposed neuropsychological battery may be of clinical value, especially when the option of extensive and comprehensive neuropsychological testing is limited. The psychometric validity of an ALS-frontotemporal dementia diagnosis using neuropsychological tests is also discussed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Age-related white matter hyperintensities are frequent incidental findings on T2-weighted brain MRI, and they are evaluated in clinical practice using a visual rating scale. Objective: To evaluate inter- and intra-rater agreement in MRI visual evaluations of age-related white matter hyperintensities made by two radiologists with different levels of experience using a visual rating scale. Methods: Two radiologists of two different levels of experience separately rated age-related white matter hyperintensities in 40 consecutive 3-tesla brain MRI scans using the Fazekas and Schmidt visual rating scale. Ratings were made on axial FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) sequences. Two readings were made by each radiologist. Intra- and inter-rater agreement was statistically determined by using Cohen's weighted kappa analysis. Results: Forty patients (21 females, 19 males; mean age = 57 ± 18.43 years) were included between September and October 2011. Mean values ± SD for visual scores were as follows: periventricular hyperintensities, between 1.175 ± 0.9 and 1.375 ± 0.89; number of deep white matter hyperintensity lesions, between 1.325 ± 1.18 and 1.575 ± 1.15, and extent of deep white matter hyperintensity lesions, between 0.925 ± 0.78 and 1.1 ± 0.74. Intra- and inter-rater agreement was very good (x03BA; values, 0.85-0.91 and 0.80-0.97, respectively) for each of the three visual scale criteria, with significant correlations between ratings (r = 0.95; p < 0.0001) and readings (r = 0.91; p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Visual assessment of age-related white matter hyperintensities by radiologists using a visual scale on FLAIR sequence is reproducible. Differences in experience level do not influence readings. Visual scale use is thus justified in common practice.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: One of the main characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) generated by β- and x03B3;-secretase processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Previously it has been demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with a reduced risk of AD caused by decreased Aβ production. However, in epidemiological studies and nutritional approaches, the outcomes of DHA-dependent treatment were partially controversial. PUFAs are very susceptible to reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, which are increased during disease pathology. In line with published results, lipid peroxidation was elevated in human postmortem AD brains; especially 4-hydroxy-nonenal (HNE) was increased. To investigate whether lipid peroxidation is only a consequence or might also influence the processes leading to AD, we analyzed 7 different oxidized lipid species including 5 oxidized DHA derivatives and the lipid peroxidation products of x03C9;-3 and x03C9;-6 PUFAs, HNE and 4-hydroxy-hexenal, in human neuroblastoma cells and mouse mixed cortical neurons. In the presence of oxidized lipids Aβ and soluble β-secreted APP levels were elevated, whereas soluble α-secreted APP was decreased, suggesting a shift from the nonamyloidogenic to the amyloidogenic pathway of APP processing. Furthermore, β- and x03B3;-secretase activity was increased by oxidized lipids via increased gene expression and additionally by a direct effect on β-secretase activity. Importantly, only 1% oxidized DHA was sufficient to revert the protective effect of DHA and to significantly increase Aβ production. Therefore, our results emphasize the need to prevent DHA from oxidation in nutritional approaches and might help explain the divergent results of clinical DHA studies.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) has traditionally been considered a disease of the gray matter (GM). However, several pathological and neuroimaging studies provided evidence of white matter (WM) abnormalities in this disease. The advent of diffusion tensor (DT) MRI allowed researchers to study in vivo cerebral WM abnormalities in AD, including the earliest stage of the disease and its atypical variants. Objective: To provide a concise overview of the main neuropathological and DT MRI studies that explored WM damage in AD providing new insights into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Results: Neuropathological studies revealed that GM and WM changes did not concur regionally in many areas, where well-preserved GM often lay over severely changed WM also in nondemented subjects with an underlying AD pathology. DT MRI studies confirmed in vivo a severe WM involvement in classical and atypical AD variants and in the prodromal stage of the disease. Microstructural WM damage was severer and more distributed than expected on the basis of cortical atrophy in all clinical AD phenotypes. Conclusions: AD is characterized by a relevant involvement of the WM as demonstrated by postmortem and in vivo evidence. WM microstructural damage in AD is not always secondary to neuronal loss, suggesting a role of other pathological mechanisms such as prion-like propagation of altered proteins or neuroinflammation. DT MRI offers new insight into AD pathophysiology and, more importantly, new possible targets for future experimental therapies.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Fragile-X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset multisystem neurological disorder characterized by intention tremor and cerebellar ataxia. Objective: We hypothesized that in FMR1 premutation females with FXTAS, a normal X chromosome might more frequently be inactivated; therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between skewed X chromosome inactivation (XCI) and FXTAS. Methods: We studied the XCI patterns of cases of FMR1 premutation in 10 women with FXTAS and 21 without FXTAS. Results: The distribution of XCI patterns in the FXTAS and no-FXTAS groups showed differences regarding the allele presenting severe skewed XCI. In the FXTAS group, all cases preferentially inactivated the non-expanded X chromosome, whereas in the no-FXTAS group, all inactivated the expanded X chromosome. Nevertheless, no significant differences were found on comparing XCI frequencies among FMR1 premutation carriers with and without FXTAS. As expected, we found statistically significant differences in the skewed XCI on comparing FMR1 premutation women and controls. Conclusion: Although the reduced sample size and blood XCI patterns are two limitations of this study, our results suggest that the skewed XCI of the normal FMR1 allele may be a risk factor for the development of FXTAS. Furthermore, our findings also support the protective effect of the expression of a normal FMR1 allele.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is a disabling complication of levodopa therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) with no effective treatments. Fluctuations in levels of levodopa constitute a key risk factor of LID. There is a pressing need for the development of a simple animal model of LID. Several genetic and toxin-based models of PD in Caenorhabditis elegans have been described, which have advanced our understanding of PD pathophysiology. We aimed to study levodopa-induced changes in a Parkinson's disease model of C. elegans expressing human α-synuclein. Methods: We exposed the α-synuclein C. elegans to levodopa in continuous and alternating fashions. Automated behavioral analysis was then used to quantify changes in motor activity. Confocal microscopy was used next to quantify changes in dopamine receptor distribution and expression in motor neurons of live C. elegans. Results: Chronic exposure to levodopa led to hyperactivity of the α-synuclein C. elegans without meaningful increase in motor activity. There was also an increase in peripheral clustering and expression of dopamine receptors in motor neurons. Both of these changes were significantly higher with alternating, compared to continuous, exposure to levodopa. Conclusions: This is the first report of changes in motor and dopamine receptors induced by levodopa in C. elegans overexpressing human α-synuclein. We propose that these phenotypes represent a simple animal model of LID in C. elegans. Such a model holds the promise of enabling high-throughput screenings for potential therapeutic targets and drug candidates.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder of the motor neurons, leads to the disorganization of the neurofilament (NF) cytoskeleton and - ultimately - the deterioration of the neuromuscular junction. Some familial cases of ALS are caused by mutated FUS, TDP-43 or SOD1; it is thought that the mutated proteins inflict pathology either by gain or loss of function. The proper function of the neuromuscular junction requires sAPP, a soluble proteolytic fragment of the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) - a transmembrane protein implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether sAPP, FUS, TDP-43 and SOD1 are mechanistically linked in a common pathway deregulated in both AD and ALS is not known. Summary: We show that sAPP, TDP-43, FUS and SOD1 are transported to neurite terminals by a mechanism that involves endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-like tubules and requires peripherin NFs. The transport of these proteins, and the translocation of the ER protein reticulon 4 (Rtn4) into neurites was studied in CAD cells, a brainstem-derived neuronal cell line highly relevant to AD and ALS. We show that a significant fraction of sAPP is generated in the soma and accumulates in a juxtanuclear ER subdomain. In neurites, sAPP localizes to Rtn4-positive ER-like tubules that extend from the soma into the growth cone and colocalizes with peripherin NFs. Knocking down peripherin disrupts the NF network and diminishes the accumulation of sAPP, TDP-43, FUS, SOD1 and Rtn4 at terminals. Key Messages: We propose that the impediment of a common, ER-mediated mechanism of transport of sAPP, TDP-43, FUS and SOD1, caused by a disrupted NF network, could be part of the mechanisms leading to AD and ALS.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective death of motor neurons. Mutations in the SOD1 gene encoding the superoxide dismutase 1 are present in 15% of familial ALS cases and in 2% of sporadic cases. These mutations are associated with the formation of SOD1-positive aggregates. The mechanisms of aggregation remain unknown, but posttranslational modifications of SOD1 may be involved. Here, we report that NSC-34 motor neuronal cells expressing mutant SOD1 contained aggregates positive for small ubiquitin modifier-1 (SUMO-1), and in parallel a reduced level of free SUMO-1. CLEM (correlative light and electron microscopy) analysis showed nonorganized cytosolic aggregates for all mutations tested (SOD1A4V, SOD1V31A, and SOD1G93C). We next show that preventing the SUMOylation of mutant SOD1 by the substitution of lysine 75, the SUMOylation site of SOD1, significantly reduces the number of motor neuronal cells with aggregates. These results support the need for further research on the SUMOylation pathways, which may be a potential therapeutic target in ALS.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder with a complex physiopathology and still undefined initiators. Several risk factors have been suggested for AD with recent evidence supporting an etiopathogenic role of chronic environmental stress and glucocorticoids (GCs, stress hormones) in the development of the disease. Indeed, both AD and chronic stress are associated with neuronal atrophy, synaptic loss and cognitive impairment. Our previous studies have demonstrated the aggravating role of stress and GCs on AD pathology, including Tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation and cognitive deficits in various AD models. In light of the suggested involvement of Tau missorting in AD synaptotoxity and the dual cytoplasmic and synaptic role of Tau, our recent studies focused on the possible role of Tau in the underlying cascades of stress/GC neuronal malfunction/atrophy in wild-type animals by monitoring the intracellular localization of Tau and its phosphorylation status in different cellular compartments. Summary: Biochemical, ultrastructural, behavioral and neurostructural analysis have helped demonstrate that prolonged GC administration leads to dendritic remodeling and spine atrophy and loss in the rat hippocampus triggering Tau missorting at hippocampal synapses with the participation of specific phosphorylated Tau isoforms in this synaptic accumulation. Key Messages: The above findings suggest that Tau plays an essential role in mediating the neurodegenerative effects of stress and GCs towards the development of AD pathology. In addition, they highlight the involvement of Tau missorting in mechanism(s) of synaptic atrophy, beyond AD adding to our limited knowledge of the mechanisms through which stress causes brain pathology.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, tau immunotherapy has advanced from proof-of-concept studies [Sigurdsson EM, NIH R01AG020197, 2001; Asuni AA, et al: J Neurosci 2007;27:9115-9129], which have now been confirmed and extended by us and others. Phase I clinical trials on active and passive tau immunizations are being conducted, with several additional passive tau antibody trials likely to be initiated in the near future for Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. Because tau pathology correlates better with the degree of dementia than amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology, greater clinical efficacy may be achieved by clearing tau than Aβ aggregates in the later stages of the disease, when cognitive impairments become evident. Substantial insight has now been obtained regarding which epitopes to target, mechanism of action and potential toxicity, but much remains to be clarified. All of these factors likely depend on the model/disease or stage of pathology and the immunogen/antibody. Interestingly, tau antibodies interact with the protein both extra- and intracellularly, but the importance of each site for tau clearance is not well defined. Some antibodies are readily taken up into neurons, whereas others are not. It can be argued that extracellular clearance may be safer but less efficacious than intraneuronal clearance and/or sequestration to prevent secretion and further spread of tau pathology. Development of therapeutic tau antibodies has led to antibody-derived imaging probes, which are more specific than the dye-based compounds that are already in clinical trials. Such specificity may give valuable information on the pathological tau epitope profile, which could then guide the selection of therapeutic antibodies for maximal efficacy and safety. Hopefully, tau immunotherapy will be effective in clinical trials, and further advanced by mechanistic clarification in experimental models with insights from biomarkers and postmortem analyses of clinical subjects.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background/aims: Recent studies have indicated a link between the impaired capacity of de novo protein synthesis and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, it has been established that eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) plays a critical role in maintaining long-term synaptic plasticity, a cellular model for learning and memory. The aim of the present study is to determine whether brain eEF1A protein levels are dysregulated in brain tissue from AD patients compared with controls. Methods: Postmortem human brain samples collected from patients clinically diagnosed as AD, and from age-matched healthy controls, were utilized for this study. Both Western blot and immunohistochemistry approaches were utilized to investigate the potential alteration of eEF1A protein levels by using a specific antibody. Results: Our data demonstrate that eEF1A expression is reduced in AD patients in the hippocampus, but not in the cerebellum or midfrontal gyrus. Furthermore, immunohistochemical experiments reveal that neuronal eEF1A reduction in the AD hippocampus is localized to the CA1 and dentate gyrus, but not to the CA3. Conclusion: Dysregulation of eEF1A and its associated signaling pathways might represent novel molecular mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis. Further investigation is necessary to determine whether eEF1A is a viable therapeutic target for AD and other cognitive syndromes.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Late-onset Alzheimer's disease is a genetically complex disorder. For 17 years, APOE was the only known susceptibility gene for disease. Through mostly genome-wide association studies, 25 loci are now known to associate with late-onset Alzheimer's disease. These susceptibility loci are not randomly distributed with respect to their functions. In fact, pathway analysis implicates significant enrichment of immunity, endocytosis, cholesterol metabolism, and ubiquitination in disease. Summary: Twenty-five loci have now been reliably shown to associate with Alzheimer's disease. However, a significant proportion of genetic variation in disease pathology is yet to be detected. Rare variation is being investigated through exome chip and next-generation sequencing experiments, which have already identified new protective and risk variants. Using a polygenic risk score approach, it is now possible to identify population groups with the greatest and fewest biological susceptibilities to disease. This method has proved more effective in predicting disease status than individual, genome-wide significant variants of small/moderate effect. Future studies will establish the specific functional changes that contribute to disease by piloting novel cellular modelling techniques using reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells from individuals with selected risk profiles. This will allow a variety of models to be produced to help understand disease mechanisms and test new drug therapies. Key Messages: Alzheimer's disease is a polygenic trait that has been linked to deficits in immunity, endocytosis, cholesterol metabolism and ubiquitination. Future work will focus on identifying rare disease susceptibility loci, unpicking the functional significance of the known risk loci and piloting novel cellular modelling techniques.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neurodegenerative Diseases