Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)

Publisher: Informa Healthcare

Current impact factor: 3.00

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.997
2013 Impact Factor 3.71
2012 Impact Factor 2.867
2011 Impact Factor 3.33
2010 Impact Factor 3.137
2009 Impact Factor 2.265
2008 Impact Factor 2.739
2007 Impact Factor 2.274
2006 Impact Factor 1.856
2005 Impact Factor 2.362
2004 Impact Factor 1.884
2003 Impact Factor 2.46
2002 Impact Factor 1.909
2001 Impact Factor 1.215
2000 Impact Factor 0.908
1999 Impact Factor 0.747
1998 Impact Factor 0.706
1997 Impact Factor 0.776
1996 Impact Factor 0.895
1995 Impact Factor 0.957
1994 Impact Factor 1.06
1993 Impact Factor 0.959
1992 Impact Factor 0.613

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.08
Cited half-life 6.20
Immediacy index 0.81
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.96
Other titles Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden: Online)
ISSN 1651-226X
OCLC 37914584
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Informa Healthcare

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website or institution website
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Non-commercial
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • NIH funded authors may post articles to PubMed Central for release 12 months after publication
    • Wellcome Trust authors may deposit in Europe PMC after 6 months
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Solid organ transplant recipients are at increased risk of developing malignancies. The objective of this prospective, observational, one-armed study was to study the feasibility to add a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor to the immunosuppressive regimen in transplanted patients with post-transplant malignancies. During the trial the need to improve identification of post-transplant malignancies and to reassure adequate oncological treatment of these patients became evident. Multidisciplinary team (MDT) evaluation of oncological and immunosuppressive treatments was implemented for all patients with malignancies after renal or combined renal and pancreas transplantation because of the trial. Material and methods At Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden, a MDT consisting of transplant surgeons, nephrologists, oncologists and dermatologists evaluated 120 renal or combined renal and pancreas-transplanted recipients diagnosed with malignancies from September 2006 to July 2012. To identify all malignancies, the population was linked to the Regional Tumor Registry (RTR). We recorded to which extent a switch to mTOR inhibitors was possible and how often the originally planned oncological managements were adjusted. All patients were followed for three years. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02241564). Results In 76 of 120 patients (63%) a switch to mTOR inhibitors was possible. Immunosuppression was interrupted in seven patients (6%), reduced in three patients (2%) and remained unchanged in 34 of 120 patients (28%). Identification of post-transplant malignancies increased significantly after linkage to RTR (p = 0.015). The initially recommended oncological treatment was adjusted in 23 of 44 patients (52%) with solid or hematological malignancies; 36 of these patients (82%) were treated according to national guidelines. Conclusion In two thirds of the patients the immunosuppressive treatment could be changed to an mTOR inhibitor with anti-tumor effects in transplanted patients with post-transplant malignancies. The use of regional tumor registers considerably improved the identification of patients with post-transplant malignancies indicating that post-transplant malignancies might be timely underreported in transplant registers.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Age is the strongest risk factor for developing cancer. The aim of the present analysis is to give an overview of the trends in cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence, and relative survival in Denmark from 1980 to 2012 focusing on age, comparing persons aged 70 years or more with those aged less than 70 years. Material and methods Data derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries. The Danish data originate from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013. Results Incidence and mortality rates of all sites, but non-melanoma skin cancer, were higher and relative survival was lower among persons aged 70 years or more than those aged less than 70 years. The age distribution (age group-specific percentages of total number of incident cases) remained constant over time while the percentage of persons dying from cancer decreased with time up to the age of 79 years but increased for those aged 80 years or more, in whom about a third of all cancer deaths occurred in 2012. In 2003-2007, the five-year relative survival was 48% for men aged 70-79 years, 38% for men aged 80-89 years, and 29% for men aged 90 years or more and the corresponding figures for women were 46%, 39%, and 36%, respectively. There was a substantial increase in the number of prevalent cancer cases aged 70 years or older, especially among those aged 90 years or more. Conclusion An increase in elderly cancer patients is expected over the coming 20 years due to an increasing elderly population. Healthcare providers need to focus on developing specific strategies for treatment of elderly cancer patients in the future.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy among women worldwide and the second most common cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. The aim of the present analysis is to describe trends in incidence, mortality, prevalence, and relative survival in Denmark from 1980 to 2012 focusing on age, comparing persons aged 70 years or more with those aged less than 70 years. Material and methods Cancer of the breast was defined as ICD-10 code C50. Data derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013. Results The proportion of patients diagnosed with breast cancer over the age of 70 years increased with time to 29% of women and 44% of men in 2012. Incidence rates increased with time and peaked around 2010 in all age groups except for those aged 90 years or more. Mortality rates were clearly separated by age with increasing mortality rates by increasing age group for both women and men. Relative survival increased over time in all age groups, but patients aged 70 years or more had a poorer relative survival than those aged less than 70 years. In 2012, 58 521 persons (all ages) were alive in Denmark after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Conclusion Poorer survival of Danish breast cancer patients over the age of 70 years is likely to be due to inferior treatment and non-adherence to treatment guidelines. There is a need for clinical trials focusing on patients over the age of 70 years.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background The aim of this study was to examine the trends in incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence of cancers of the urinary bladder and urinary tract in Denmark from 1980 to 2012 with particular focus on elderly patients over age 70 years. Design Cancer of the urinary bladder and urinary tract was defined as ICD-10 codes C67.9, D09.0, D41.4. Data were derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry. Results The average annual number of bladder cancers increased from 1478 to 1810 (22%) from 1980 to 2012, with close to 60% occurring in the elderly population. The incidence rates were 7-10 times higher in persons aged 70 years or more compared with younger persons. Mortality rates were decreasing with time in all age groups but 90+-year-old men. The one- and five-year relative survival improved significantly with time for all age groups both in men and women. The prevalence increased two times from 6014 in 1980 to 12 359 in 2012 among men and from 1974 to 4454 among women. There was a relatively higher proportional increase in prevalence among elderly men compared to younger patients. Conclusion More prospective data are needed, preferably as randomized clinical trials, for determining the influence of age on the decisions of the surgical approach as well as chemo/radiotherapy for the elderly patients with urothelial cancers compared to younger patients.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background The incidence of melanoma is rising in Denmark. In the present paper we describe incidence, mortality and survival in Denmark from 1980 to 2012 focusing on age, comparing persons aged 70 years or more with those aged less than 70 years. Material and methods Melanoma was defined as ICD-10 code C43. Data derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on incidence, mortality, survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up until the end of 2013. Results In 1980, 21.4% of the patients diagnosed with melanoma were older than 70 years compared to 28.4% in 2012. In persons aged less than 70 years, the incidence rate was higher among women than in men, but men aged 70-89 years had an incidence rate almost twice that of women. Incidence rates were increasing, particularly among the elderly. In 1980, 32.6% of the patients who died from melanoma were older than 69 years compared to 56.2% in 2012. In 1980, the mortality rate was 121.4 per 100 000 person years, increasing to 353.1 in 2012. For the younger patients, the mortality rates are only slight increasing, but for the elder patients the mortality rates are increasing dramatically. In general the survival has increased for all age groups over the years. Conclusion The incidence rates for all age groups are rising. The increase was mainly caused by a rising incidence among the elderly. Mortality among Danish patients with melanoma is increasing and especially the mortality in the elderly. This important knowledge must be kept in mind when future treatment strategies are planned.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background The number of hematological malignancies is expected to increase as the Danish population ages within the next few decades. Despite this, data on the course of hematological cancers among the oldest patients are sparse with many intervention studies focusing on younger age groups. The aim of this study is to present Danish incidence and mortality rates among older patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), multiple myeloma (MM), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Material and methods Nationwide population-based study presenting the incidence, prevalence and mortality rates of NHL, MM, and AML with a focus on the elderly population in Denmark during the last few decades. Data were drawn from the NORDCAN database. Results Incidence rates of NHL, MM, CLL and AML were 10-50 times higher among the population aged 70 years or more than among the younger population. An increasing incidence with stable or decreased mortality rates was seen mainly among elderly patients with NHL during the last few decades, leading to increased survival and a greater prevalence of patients with NHL. Increased relative survival and prevalence could also be seen among elderly patients with MM and CLL, while the trends of the incidence rates were inconclusive for these diseases. Survival among patients with AML improved most notably in those aged below 70 years leading to an increased prevalence of AML patients predominantly in this age group. Conclusion Improvements in diagnostics and treatment have led to increased survival and therefore prevalence of elderly patients with NHL, MM, CLL and AML during the past decades.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background The aim of this analysis was to describe trends in incidence, mortality, prevalence, and survival in Danish women with gynecologic cancer from 1980-2012 comparing women aged 70 years or more with younger women. Material and methods Gynecologic cancers included were ICD-10 codes C53 (cancer of the cervix uteri), C54 (corpus uteri cancer), C56 (ovarian cancer) and C57 (Fallopian tube cancer). Data derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data are delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013. Results For cervical cancer the incidence decreased among women aged less than 70 years and remained stable among the elderly. The mortality rates were clearly separated by age groups with a 2-3 fold higher mortality rate among 70 + years-old than younger women. The mortality rates, however, decreased in all age groups from 1980-2012. For ovarian and Fallopian tube cancers the incidence was almost constant, whereas the average annual number of deaths decreased over time from 466 in 1980 to 396 in 2012. The mortality rates were clearly separated by age groups with mortality rates 3-4 times higher among the elderly. The mortality rate decreased among women less than 70 years during the entire period. The average annual number of newly diagnosed corpus uteri cancer increased from 631 in 1980 to 773 in 2012. The mortality rates were clearly separated by age groups with much higher mortality rates among the 70+ years-old as compared with younger women. Overall the mortality rates decreased from 1980 to 2012. Conclusion In gynecologic cancer both mortality rates and survival are age-dependent with a significantly shorter survival in the group of elderly.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Tumors in the central nervous system (CNS) comprise a heterogeneous group of tumors with different treatment strategies and prognoses. Current treatment regimens are based on studies on patients mainly younger than 70 years. The aim of the present study was to analyze and describe trends in incidence, mortality, prevalence, and relative survival in Denmark from 1980 to 2012 focusing on patients older than 70 years. Material and methods Tumors in the CNS were defined as ICD-10 codes C70-72, D32-33 and D42-43. Data with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival derived from the NORDCAN database were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013. Results During the period 1980-2012 the number of patients with CNS tumors increased from 603 to 1378 patients. The increase is seen mainly in the elderly patients, and especially in women aged 84-89 and 90 + at the time of diagnosis. During the same time period, the mortality rates increased within all age groups, most significantly in patients aged 70 years or older. This may reflect an increased focus on and identification of these patients. Noteworthy; the number of patients living with a CNS tumor increased from 2952 in 1980 to 12 147 patients in 2010. Conclusion This study suggests that the current treatment strategies in general may have improved survival in patients with CNS tumors, but in order to improve survival further in the increasing group of elderly patients more knowledge about treatment of these patients is needed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Backgound The purpose of the study is to elucidate the epidemiology of elderly patients with prostate cancer in Denmark and identify the differences between younger (<70 years) and elderly (≥70 years) patients. Material and methods Prostate cancer was defined as ICD-10 code C61. Data were derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data are delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry. Results The average annual number of newly diagnosed prostate cancers in Denmark has risen from 1297 patients in 1980 to 4315 patients in 2012. The prevalence increased consistently in all age groups more than seven-fold in the period, from 3987 patients in 1980 to 28 951 patients in 2012. The cancer-specific mortality in Denmark has slightly increased over the observed period, in coherence with the growth of the population, resulting in unchanged mortality rates, with the exception of the patients above 80 years, where the mortality rates are increased. The one- and five-year relative survival for prostate cancer improved significantly for all age groups over the time period from 1980 to 2012. Conclusion The incidence, prevalence, and survival of elderly prostate cancer patients has increased over the observed period but with unchanged mortality rates, except in patients above 80 years, where the mortality rates were increasing.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background The purpose of this study is to elucidate incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence of kidney cancer in elderly persons compared with younger persons in Denmark. Material and methods Cancer of the kidney was defined as ICD-10 code DC 64. Data derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013. Results The proportion of patients diagnosed with kidney cancer over the age of 70 years has decreased from 43% in 1980 to 32% in 2012 in men and remained almost constant in women, around 50%. Incidence rates were at least five times higher in men aged 70 years more but there was no particular trend with time. In men aged less than 70 years, the incidence rates started increasing around 2000. The incidence rates were lower in women but with a similar pattern as in men. Mortality rates remained stable over time in persons aged 70 years or more while they decreased with time in younger women. Both the one- and the five-year relative survival increased steadily over time for all age groups but the survival was lower for patients aged 70 years or more than for younger patients. The prevalence increased three times from 1559 patients being alive after kidney cancer in1980 to 4713 in 2012. Conclusion A challenge in managing kidney cancer in the elderly is to establish interdisciplinary collaborations between different specialties, such as surgeons, clinical oncologists, and geriatricians to be able to deliver the best possible care in the future.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Registration of haematological malignancies presents specific challenges, and a wide range of data is required to ensure case ascertainment and proper classification of these diseases. We studied the data quality of myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic neoplasms in the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR), comparing information with hospital discharges. Material and methods Hospital discharges (HILMO) in 2007-2013 including diagnostic codes of myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic neoplasms were extracted. Patients were individually linked to the FCR database for all haematological malignancies registered in 1953-2013. Coverage and accuracy of the FCR and agreement between registers was estimated. Results In total 5289 individuals were retrieved from two registers. Of these, 1406 were common, 1080 only found in the FCR and 2803 only in the HILMO. Coverage of myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic neoplasms in the FCR was 47.0% (95% CI 45.7-48.4%). Almost one quarter of the registrations in the FCR was based on a death certificate only. The accuracy of diagnosis was 51.4% (95% CI 49.4-53.3%), but it varied substantially by disease category. Kappa statistic for agreement between registers was excellent (0.83, 95% CI 0.80-0.85) for common cases. 7.6% of cases in the HILMO was registered as leukaemias in the FCR. Conclusions More than half of the patients found in the HILMO were entirely missing from the FCR. However, some of the diagnoses in HILMO may be preliminary and this represents the maximal number of missing cases. Cancer registers benefit from supplementary data sources, such as hospital discharges, to increase coverage and accuracy of register data on haematological malignancies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Lung cancer is an increasing problem in the older patient population due to the improvement in life expectation of the Western population. In this study we examine trends in lung cancer incidence and mortality in Denmark from 1980 to 2012 with special focus on the elderly. Material and methods Lung cancer was defined as ICD-10 codes C33-34. Data derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence, and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013. Results In 2012, about 50% of lung cancers were diagnosed among persons aged 70 years or more. For men and women older than 75 years the incidence rates have been increasing and for those aged 80-84 years, the rates have doubled since 1980. Due to the poor survival, similar trends were seen in mortality rates. Over the period, the one-year relative survival rates almost doubled in patients aged 70 years or more, but still only 25% of the patients aged 80-89 years survived their lung cancer for one year. Conclusion The incidence of lung cancer is closely linked to the pattern of tobacco smoking with the differences between gender and age groups reflecting smoking behavior in birth cohorts. Elderly patients with lung cancer are a heterogeneous group in whom treatment should be offered according to comorbidity and a geriatric assessment.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Cancers of the liver, bile duct, gall bladder and pancreas (HPB-c) are a heterogeneous group, united almost exclusively by a poor prognosis. As the number of elderly in the Western world continues to rise and HPB-c are associated with age, we wanted to examine changes in incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival for these cancers. Materials and methods HBP-c was defined as ICD-10 codes C22 (liver), C23-24 (gall bladder), and C25 (pancreas). Data derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013. Results The incidence and mortality rates of cancer of the liver and pancreas increased over time while the rates of cancer of the gall bladder and bile duct decreased. All HBP-c were more frequent in persons over the age of 70 than in younger persons. The relative one- and five-year survival rose in most HPB-c, but mainly occurring in the younger population of 0-69 years with only small to no gains in the 80 + group. Conclusion As the number of persons aged 80 years or more will increase dramatically in the following years, and our results show a gap in relative survival, it is important to continue to study this population in order to improve management and outcome.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Upper gastro-intestinal cancer (UGIC) includes malignancies in esophagus, stomach and small intestine, and represents some of the most frequent malignancies worldwide. The aim of the present analysis was to describe incidence, mortality and survival in UGIC patients in Denmark from 1980 to 2012 according to differences in age and time periods. Material and methods UGIC was defined as ICD-10 codes C15-C17. Data derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013. Results The proportion of male patients over the age of 70 years diagnosed with esophageal cancer was constant over time (around 42%) but increased in females to 49% in 2012. Incidence rates increased with time and continued to rise in all ages. Mortality rates were clearly separated by age groups with increasing mortality rates by increasing age group for both sexes. Relative survival increased slowly over time in all age groups. The proportion of older male and female patients with stomach cancer increased to 50% and 54%, respectively, in 2012. Incidence rates decreased steadily with time, especially from 1980 to 1990 but continued to decrease in all age groups. Mortality rates decreased considerably from 1980 to 90 and have been almost constant during the last decade for both women and men. Relative survival increased modest over time in both genders and all age groups. In 2012, only 1471 persons were alive after a diagnosis of stomach cancer. Conclusion There is a need for clinical trials focusing on patients over the age of 70 years with co-existing comorbidity.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a disease of the older population. The current demographic ageing leads to more elderly patients and is expected to further increase the number of patients with CRC. The objective of the present paper is to outline incidence, mortality and prevalence from 1980 to 2012 and survival data from 1968 to 2012 in Danish CRC patients focusing on the impact of ageing. Material and methods Data were derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data are delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013. This study focuses on the elderly population categorized in six age groups. Results The incidence of CRC has increased over the past three decades. Incidence rate has increased in patients with colon cancer, but showed a decreasing trend in the oldest patients with rectal and anal cancer. Mortality has diminished in younger patients with colon cancer, but increased with increasing age. However, mortality did not increase proportionally to incidence. In rectal and anal cancer mortality has decreased, except among the oldest patients. This correlates to a decreasing incidence rate. Prevalence is widely increasing mainly because of increased incidence and longer survival, which is reflected in the increasing one- and five-year age-specific relative survival after a diagnosis of colon, rectal and anal cancer. Conclusion The incidence of CRC is increasing, especially in older citizens, and mortality increases with older age. There is limited knowledge on how to optimize treatment in older CRC patients and future focus must be how to select and tailor the treatment for older CRC patients.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) comprises a variety of malignant tumors. Due to the rarity of each individual malignant entity, knowledge of epidemiological changes and trends over time may be derived from data compiled in regional and national registries. This study analyzed the development in incidence rates and mortality in elderly HNSCC patients in Denmark between 1980 and 2012 with specific attention to compliance to radiotherapy, the main treatment modality of HNSCC in Denmark. Material and methods HNSCC consisting of more than 25 patients per year over the age of 70 years were analyzed. This included cancer of the oral cavity defined as ICD-codes C00.3-4, C02-04, C05.0, C06; oropharynx as C01, C05.1-9, C09-10; and larynx as C32 recorded in the NORDCAN database. Additional data from the DAHANCA database was added to assess differences in compliance to treatment between younger and older patient groups. Results HNSCC was predominant in younger patients. Only 17% were older than 70 years. The median age was 60 years. Generally, incidence rates rose for cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx between 1980 and 2012 and stabilized for laryngeal cancer. Mortality rates had a shallower increase, especially in younger age groups, which translated into improved age-specific survival rates. Compliance to radiotherapy was high for all age groups. Failure to receive at least 60 Gy during radical radiation treatment was 2.3% despite a significant increase in patients with poor WHO performance status over time. Conclusion HNSCC is a rare disease in patients above 70 years accounting for only 17% of all HNSCC patients. Incidence rates increased over time, but age-specific survival rates improved, especially in younger patients. Failure rates to comply with radiation treatment, however, were low in both young and elderly patients.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Treatment of cancer with chemotherapy decreases endurance capacity and muscle strength. Training during chemotherapy might prevent this. There are no clear guidelines concerning which type of training and which training dose are effective. This review aims to gain insight into the different training modalities during chemotherapy and the effects of such training to improve endurance capacity and muscle strength in order to obtain the knowledge to compose a future training program which trains cancer patients in the most effective way. Material and methods A systematic search of PubMed was carried out. In total, 809 studies of randomized controlled trials studying the effects of training during chemotherapy on endurance capacity and muscle strength were considered. Only 14 studies met all the inclusion criteria. The studies were assessed on methodological quality by using Cochrane criteria for randomized controlled trials. Results The quality of the studies was generally poor and the study populations varied considerably as the training programs were very heterogeneous. Variables of endurance capacity reported beneficial effects in 10 groups (59%). Increases due to training ranged from 8% to 31%. Endurance capacity decreased in nine of 13 control groups (69%), which ranged from 1% to 32%. Muscle strength improved significantly in 17 of 18 intervention groups (94%), ranging from 2% to 38%. Muscle strength also improved in 11 of 14 control groups (79%), but this increase was only minimal, ranging from 1.3% to 6.5%. Conclusions This review indicates that training during chemotherapy may help in preventing the decrease in muscle strength and endurance capacity. It is important to know which training intensity and duration is the most effective in training cancer patients, to provide a training program suitable for every cancer patient. Training should be based on good research and should be implemented into international guidelines and daily practice. More research is needed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)