Scandinavian Journal of Public Health (SCAND J PUBLIC HEALT)

Publisher: Scandinavian Association for Social Medicine, SAGE Publications

Journal description

Public Health as we enter the third millennium, is facing challenges of new and re-emerging diseases. This health transition includes both changes in demographic patterns and the responses of health services to changing patterns of disease. However, while the ongoing transition allows for the chronic diseases of "welfare" and ageing it certainly also results from the "export" of well-known risk factors. Prevention often lies in the hands of public health policy and evidence-based implementation rather than in the search for new risk factors. Equity in health is on the public health agenda of most countries and agencies today. Inequity means unfairness - but nothing is as unfair as poverty, nor any epidemiological risk factor as strong. In bringing the chronic and pandemic nature of poverty and health needs to the attention of the world's conscience, a public health journal may be one lever. We will not avoid disclosing these value premises. They create a future challenge for public health researchers. Our ambition is to make this journal a forum for local, national as well as global health issues and we would like to recognise the challenge in bringing theory and methods nearer to public health efforts. We will certainly try to reflect the healthy multidisciplinarity that has become characteristic of public health globally in recent years. Epidemiologists, health economists and sociologists may thus contribute to conceptual and methodological development of the changing public health in terms of its efficacy, cost-effectiveness and social and ethical implications. Since January 2000 SJPH is under a new editorial management. We welcome contributions from North to South, on Nordic as well as International Public Health Developments, desk or field based studies, quantitative as well as qualitative. Our ambition is unequivocal - to foster and disseminate valid results from public health endeavours and, to the best of our ability, influence the current health research disequilibrium - that too little research effort is addressed to the bulk of health problems.

Current impact factor: 1.83

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.832
2013 Impact Factor 3.125
2012 Impact Factor 1.966
2011 Impact Factor 1.388
2010 Impact Factor 1.487
2009 Impact Factor 1.435
2008 Impact Factor 1.537
2007 Impact Factor 1.222
2006 Impact Factor 1.021
2005 Impact Factor 0.727
2004 Impact Factor 0.881
2003 Impact Factor 1.018
2002 Impact Factor 0.769
2001 Impact Factor 0.728
2000 Impact Factor 0.34

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.20
Cited half-life 4.80
Immediacy index 0.21
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 1.30
Website Scandinavian Journal of Public Health website
Other titles Scandinavian journal of social medicine (Online), Social medicine
ISSN 1651-1905
OCLC 39636482
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

SAGE Publications

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors retain copyright
    • Pre-print on any website
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website, departmental website, institutional website or institutional repository
    • On other repositories including PubMed Central after 12 months embargo
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Post-print version with changes from referees comments can be used
    • "as published" final version with layout and copy-editing changes cannot be archived but can be used on secure institutional intranet
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Publisher last reviewed on 29/07/2015
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Mental health problems in adolescence are associated with impaired function in young adulthood. Our aim was to assess how a hypothetical reduction in mental health problems in adolescence was related to medical benefits in young adulthood and to examine the mediating role of completion of upper secondary school. Methods: We used a population-based sample of more than 10,000 10th-grade adolescents with self-reported data on internalizing and externalizing mental health problems. The sample was linked to the Norwegian national registers of education and medical benefits. The mediation analysis was based on a causal inference framework. Results: During a three-year period in young adulthood, 6.4% of men and 5.9% of women received medical benefits. A two-point hypothetical reduction in externalizing problems was related to a lower probability of receiving medical benefits of 1.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-2.1) percentage points in young men and 1.8 (95% CI 1.3-2.3) percentage points in young women. The proportion mediated by the completion of upper secondary school was 52% (95% CI 36-76) among boys and 42% (95% CI 29-60) among girls. The corresponding reduction in the probability of receiving medical benefits was 1.8 percentage points for internalizing problems in both sexes (95% CI boys 1.2-2.4 and girls 1.4-2.2). The proportion mediated was lower for internalizing problems and was only significant among girls (19%). Conclusions: Intervention and prevention strategies targeting internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents may have the potential to reduce the receipt of medical benefits in young adulthood. The completion of upper secondary school seems to be a mechanism for this association, especially for externalizing problems.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: The aim was to examine trends in socio-demographic differences in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among the Lithuanian adult population from 1994 to 2014. Methods: The data from 11 postal surveys were analysed. For every survey, a nationally representative random sample aged 20-64 was drawn from the National Population Register. The sample consisted of 3000 individuals in each of the 1994-2008 surveys and 4000 in the last three surveys. Altogether, 8738 men and 11,822 women participated in the surveys. Self-reported weight and height were used to calculate BMI. Results: From 1994 to 2014, the prevalence of overweight and obesity increased in all socio-demographic groups of men, reaching 58.6% and 19.5% respectively. Highly educated men and those living in cities had higher BMI values than lower educated and non-urban inhabitants without substantial changes in the differences in BMI over the study period. In women, the prevalence of overweight decreased from 51.7% to 46%, whereas the prevalence of obesity did not change being 19.2% in 2014. Overweight and obesity were more common among lower educated women and those living in non-urban areas than in the others. Educational inequalities in weight status of women increased due to the decrease of BMI only in women with university education. Conclusions: Time trends in BMI were more pronounced among Lithuanian men than women, whereas socio-demographic inequalities were greater among women. The strategies for prevention and control of obesity should target all men and women with lower education and living in non-urban areas of Lithuania.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Coronary heart disease mortality has been internationally high in eastern Finland. The excessive mortality risk in Eastern compared with western Finns is explained by differences in cardiometabolic risk profile. Current risk profile differences and association with migration have not been reported. We examined the association of place of residence (east-west) and specifically migration with cardiometabolic risk markers and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Methods: The study population included 2204 participants with data available from childhood/youth in 1980 and follow-up examination in 2007. Results: Participants residing in eastern Finland in adulthood had 0.022±0.004mm higher IMT than Western participants. Those who migrated east-to-west had lower IMT than those staying in the east (0.027±0.006mm, p<0.0001) while no difference to those continuously living in the west was found. Those who moved east-to-west had a lower body mass index (25.3±4.3 kg/m(2) vs. 26.2±4.5kg/m(2), p=0.01), waist circumference (85.7±12.8cm vs. 88.6±12.8cm, p=0.001), prevalence of metabolic syndrome (13% vs. 21%, p=0.01), and higher socioeconomic status (16.6±3.3 vs. 15.0±3.3 school years, p<0.0001) than those who stayed in the east. Conclusions: Higher IMT was found in eastern Finns than in western Finns. Participants who migrated east-to-west had a lower IMT and a better cardiometabolic risk profile than those who stayed in the east.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: There is powerful evidence on the association between ill health and low income or low socioeconomic position of the individual. In this article we study the deterioration in self-assessed health and its determinants, focusing on unemployment and poverty status of the person. A special focus on worsening health status gives more information on the link between health and socioeconomic characteristics than static analysis of health status. Methods: The longitudinal EU Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) data covering years from 2008 to 2013 for 26 EU Member States is used to follow people for whom we have data for 4 consecutive years. We will use information on the self-rated health status of the person. Logistic regression analysis is employed to study the determinants of transition to worse health status. Results: The results show that unemployment (OR 1.23) and poverty (OR 1.19) before the health transition are significantly associated with worsening health even when controlled for the prior health status of the person. Conclusions: The results support causal link between unemployment and poverty status and subsequent health status, while we cannot exclude the role of selection in the mechanism. Understanding better the link between health and unemployment or poverty is important for better design of health and social policies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The relationship between carbohydrate intake, dietary glycaemic index (GI) and load (GL), and obesity remains unsolved. Sugar intake and obesity represent a timely topic, but studies on sugar subcategories are scarce. We aimed to study whether total carbohydrate, sucrose, lactose, fibre, dietary GI, and GL are associated with obesity in 25-79-year-old Finns. Methods: Our pooled analysis included three cross-sectional population-based studies: the DILGOM Study (n = 4842), the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study (n =1979), and the Health 2000 Survey (n = 5521). Diet was assessed by a validated food-frequency questionnaire, and anthropometric measurements were collected by standardised protocols. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression analysis. Results: In the model, which included sex, age, education, smoking, physical activity, and energy intake, the likelihood of being obese (body mass index ⩾ 30 kg/m(2)) appeared lower in the highest quartiles of total carbohydrate (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.57-0.74; P for trend < 0.0001), sucrose (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.47-0.61; P < 0.0001), and dietary GL (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.56-0.73; P < 0.0001) compared to the lowest quartiles. In contrast, dietary GI did not associate with obesity. Fibre intake associated inversely with abdominal obesity (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.71-0.90; P < 0.001). The inverse sucrose-obesity relationship appeared stronger in high fruit consumers compared to low fruit consumers (P for interaction 0.02). Conclusions: Although most of the studied carbohydrate exposures were associated with a diminished likelihood of being obese, prospective studies are needed to assess temporal relations to support causal inference.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Common mental disorders are a major cause of long-term sickness absence and a reason for disability benefits, although many people with these disorders remain employed. Therefore, it is important to prevent them from taking sick leave or relying on disability benefits. Consequently, we wished to identify the factors associated with sickness presence among patients undergoing treatment. Method: Participants were recruited from patients who met for their first session at a Return to Work clinic. A total of 251 patients completed a questionnaire that included questions on background information, mental health and functioning, and psychosocial work factors. Of these, 49% were fully working, 21.9% were partially working, and 29.1% were on full sickness absence. Results: Fully working patients had fewer symptoms, functioned better, and experienced greater well-being than patients wholly on sick leave. They also experienced work as less demanding, were more appreciative, and had more employment security and autonomy. They reported symptoms, functioning, and well-being at the same level as the partially working group. However, their therapists reported that they functioned better and they themselves considered work demands somewhat less stressful. Conclusions: The results indicate that both symptoms and functional capacity, in addition to work environment, are perceived as more favorable among fully working patients, compared with those completely on sick leave. However, because of the cross-sectional design, we need more studies with prospective design to examine whether these relationships are causal, and to examine when sickness presence is beneficial for patients.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: The study investigated whether people with mobility disability (MD) and/or obesity had higher job strain than people without it, and whether social support at work modifies this association. Methods: The study included 35,160 individuals (25-64 years of age) from the Stockholm Public Health Surveys of 2006 and 2010. Data on MD and obesity (BMI ⩾ 30 kg/m(2) calculated from weight (kg) and height (m)) were self-reported. According to the Demand-Control-Support theory job strain, collective strain, and isolated strain were calculated for six groups of people based on the presence of MD and obesity, using the subtraction approach (demand minus control). Differences in job strain mean scores were estimated by multivariate linear regression. Social support at work was analyzed as a potential effect modifier (high/low). Results: Obese people with MD had the highest job strain (β = 0.92, 95% CI 0.64-1.19), compared to normal weight people without MD (reference group). We found that social support at work significantly (p<0.001) modifies the association between job strain, MD and obesity. Obese people with MD had the highest isolated strain (β = 2.92, 95% CI 2.52-3.31), and the highest collective strain, although of smaller magnitude (β = 0.34, 95% CI 0.05-0.63), compared to the reference group. Conclusions: Obese people with MD perceive higher job strain than non-disabled people of normal weight. Strategies aiming to increase the social support at work may be important for this group of people to prevent them from experiencing unhealthy job strain.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: Health registers are essential sources of data used in a wide range of stroke research, including epidemiological, clinical and healthcare studies. Regardless of the type of register, the data must be of high quality to be useful. In this study, we investigated and compared the correctness and completeness of the Norwegian Patient Register (an administrative health register) and the Norwegian Stroke Register (a medical quality register for acute stroke). Methods: We reviewed the medical records for 5192 admissions to hospital in 2012 and defined cases of stroke in the two registers as true positive, false positive, true negative or false negative. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value with 95% confidence intervals assuming a normal approximation of the binomial distribution. Results: The Norwegian Stroke Register was highly correct and relatively complete (sensitivity 88.1%, specificity 100% and PPV 98.6%). The Norwegian Patient Register was more complete, but less correct, when we included both the main and secondary diagnoses of stroke (sensitivity 96.8%, specificity 99.6% and PPV 79.7%); restricting the analyses to the main diagnoses of stroke resulted in less complete and more correct registrations (sensitivity 86.1%, specificity 99.9% and PPV 93.5%). Conclusions: The Norwegian Stroke Register and the Norwegian Patient Register are adequately complete and correct to serve as valuable sources of data for epidemiological, clinical and healthcare studies, as well as for administrative purposes.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aims: Pain is common in the elderly population and its prevalence varies according to the studied disease, clinical setting, sex and age. This study examines pain in an aging population from a gender perspective. Methods: The Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC) is conducted at four research centres. Participants were recruited from the baseline sample (n=1402) at one of the research centres, SNAC-Blekinge. Individuals aged 60 years and older were included and non-participation was documented. Research personnel conducted the medical examination on two occasions. Results: The prevalence of pain was 769/1402 (54.8%), distributed as 496/817 (64.5%) women and 273/585 (35.5%) men, p<0.01. Women reported more pain located in the vertebral column, p<0.01. The most common pain location was the legs and feet. About 84% reported pain intensity as 4 or higher on the visual analogue scale (VAS). Pain intensity declines with age among men, p<0.01. The most frequent treatment was painkillers. A total of 128/263 (48.7%) of the men received no pain treatment compared with 177/478 (37.0%) of the women, p<0.01. In a multivariate logistic regression model, women yielded the highest OR [OR 1.94 (C.I. 1.51-2.49)] for pain. Conclusions: Pain is common among older adults and there are significant differences between the sexes. Almost 55% of participants reported pain, predominantly women. In the majority of cases the intensity was rated as moderate or severe (VAS >4) and women rated higher than men p<0.02. Almost half of the men (48.7%) did not receive any treatment compared to 37% of the women, p<0.01.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: In this article, I want to promote theoretical awareness and commitment among qualitative researchers in general practice and suggest adequate and feasible theoretical approaches. Approach: I discuss different theoretical aspects of qualitative research and present the basic foundations of the interpretative paradigm. Associations between paradigms, philosophies, methodologies and methods are examined and different strategies for theoretical commitment presented. Finally, I discuss the impact of theory for interpretation and the development of general practice knowledge. Main points: A scientific theory is a consistent and soundly based set of assumptions about a specific aspect of the world, predicting or explaining a phenomenon. Qualitative research is situated in an interpretative paradigm where notions about particular human experiences in context are recognized from different subject positions. Basic theoretical features from the philosophy of science explain why and how this is different from positivism. Reflexivity, including theoretical awareness and consistency, demonstrates interpretative assumptions, accounting for situated knowledge. Different types of theoretical commitment in qualitative analysis are presented, emphasizing substantive theories to sharpen the interpretative focus. Such approaches are clearly within reach for a general practice researcher contributing to clinical practice by doing more than summarizing what the participants talked about, without trying to become a philosopher. CONCLUSIONS QUALITATIVE STUDIES FROM GENERAL PRACTICE DESERVE STRONGER THEORETICAL AWARENESS AND COMMITMENT THAN WHAT IS CURRENTLY ESTABLISHED PERSISTENT ATTENTION TO AND RESPECT FOR THE DISTINCTIVE DOMAIN OF KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE WHERE THE RESEARCH DELIVERIES ARE TARGETED IS NECESSARY TO CHOOSE ADEQUATE THEORETICAL ENDEAVOURS: .
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Generally, health care consumption, especially primary care, is greater among women than men. The extent to which this sex difference is explained by reproduction and sex-specific morbidity is unclear. Methods: We examined age- and sex-specific health care service utilization and costs in the western region of Sweden. Data were retrieved from a regional health care database of information on total health care consumption in the population. Use of health care resources was divided into the following diagnosis categories: health care associated with reproduction; health care received for sex-specific morbidity; and health care provided for all other conditions. Results: Total per capita cost for health care was 20% higher for women than for men. When adjusted for reproduction and sex-specific morbidity, the cost-difference decreased to 8%. The remaining cost-difference could be explained by women's substantially higher costs for mental and behavioral disorders and diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Women were more likely to receive more accessible, less expensive primary care, while men were more likely to receive specialist inpatient care. Conclusions: The substantially greater use of reproduction-associated care among women, which largely occurs within primary care, might make it easier to also seek health care for other reasons. Efforts to eliminate barriers that prevent men from investing in their health and seeking primary care could reduce future morbidity and costs for specialist care. More studies and appropriate actions are needed to determine why women are overrepresented in mental, behavioral and musculoskeletal disorders.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: Research demonstrates that migrants are more vulnerable to poor mental health than general populations, but population-based studies with distinct migrant groups are scarce. We aim to (1) assess the prevalence of mental health symptoms in Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin migrants in Finland; (2) compare the prevalence of mental health symptoms in these migrant groups to the Finnish population; (3) determine which socio-demographic factors are associated with mental health symptoms. Methods: We used data from the Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study and Health 2011 Survey. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25), and 1.75 was used as cut-off for clinically significant symptoms. Somatization was measured using the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) somatization scale. The age-adjusted prevalence of mental health symptoms in the studied groups was calculated by gender using predicted margins. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine which socio-demographic factors are associated with mental health symptoms in the studied population groups. Results: The prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms was higher in Russian women (24%) and Kurdish men (23%) and women (49%) than in the Finnish population (9-10%). These differences were statistically significant (p <.001). Socioeconomic disadvantage (e.g. unemployment and poor economic situation) and migration-related factors (e.g. poor language proficiency and short time since migration) significantly increased the odds for depressive and anxiety symptoms. Conclusions: Mental health symptoms are highly prevalent particularly in Kurdish migrants in Finland. Holistic interventions and co-operation between integration and mental health services are acutely needed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between several indicators of social capital and risky single occasion drinking (RSOD) in a representative survey sample of the Danish general population. Methods: Data from the 2011 Danish national survey (n=2569) with respondents aged 15-79 years were used. Ordered logit modelling was applied to investigate the influence of social networks, social support, social participation and trust on RSOD. Results: A strong positive relationship was found between frequency of contact with male friends and RSOD between both sexes. Furthermore, social trust among men and membership in voluntary organisations among women was significantly associated with RSOD. Additionally, contact with male family members for women and active participation in religious services for both sexes were strongly and negatively correlated with RSOD. Conclusions: Some aspects of social capital can be positively related to at-risk health behaviours, as was found for RSOD in the Danish general population.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: Many studies have noted that substance abuse and mental health problems often occur simultaneously. The aim of the work reported here was to study the co-occurrence of mental health problems and problems related to substance use in a sample of clients visiting the Finnish social and health care services for issues related to substance use. We collected background information on the clients and considered the parts of the treatment system in which these clients were treated. Data and methods: Survey data on intoxicant-related cases in the Finnish health care and social services were gathered on a single day in 2011. During the 24 hours of data collection, all intoxicant-related cases were reported and data were obtained for 11,738 intoxicant-related cases. In this analysis we took into account the clients' background variables, mental health variables, information on the treatment type and the main reasons for the client being in treatment. The χ(2) test, Fisher's exact test and binary logistic regression analysis were used. Results: Half of the visiting clients had both substance use related and mental health problems. The strongest factors associated with the co-occurrence of substance use related and mental health problems were female sex, younger age and single marital status. Clients with co-occurring problems were more often treated in the health care services, whereas clients with only substance use related problems were primarily treated in specialized services for the treatment of substance abuse. Conclusions: It is important to identify clients with co-occurring substance use related and mental health problems. In this study, half of the clients presenting to the Finnish social and health care treatment system had both these problems.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: Past research has often neglected the sub-dimensions of work time control (WTC). Moreover, differences in levels of WTC with respect to work and demographic characteristics have not yet been examined in a representative sample. We investigated these matters in a recent sample of the Swedish working population. Methods: The study was based on the 2014 data collection of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. We assessed the structure of the WTC measure using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Differences in WTC by work and demographic characteristics were examined with independent sample t-tests, one-way ANOVAs and gender-stratified logistic regressions. Results: Best model fit was found for a two-factor structure that distinguished between control over daily hours and control over time off (root mean square error of approximation = 0.06; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.09; Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.99). Women, shift and public-sector workers reported lower control in relation to both factors. Age showed small associations with WTC, while a stronger link was suggested for civil status and family situation. Night, roster and rotating shift work seemed to be the most influential factors on reporting low control over daily hours and time off. Conclusions: Our data confirm the two-dimensional structure underlying WTC, namely the components 'control over daily hours' and 'control over time off'. Women, public-sector and shift workers reported lower levels of control. Future research should examine the public health implications of WTC, in particular whether increased control over daily hours and time off can reduce health problems associated with difficult working-time arrangements.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Public Health