Molecular Nutrition & Food Research (Mol Nutr Food Res)

Publisher: Wiley-VCH Verlag

Journal description

Molecular Nutrition & Food Research is a primary research journal devoted to linking the information arising from the scientific disciplines involved in molecular nutrition and food research. Thus, the areas covered by the journal are: Bioactivity and Safety / Chemistry / Immunology / Microbiology / Nutrition / Technology. Besides the regular contributions, Molecular Nutrition & Food Research (MNF) publishes special issues devoted to current topics from one of the above-mentioned fields, plus annual review issues.

Current impact factor: 4.60

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 4.603
2013 Impact Factor 4.909
2012 Impact Factor 4.31
2011 Impact Factor 4.301
2010 Impact Factor 4.713
2009 Impact Factor 4.356
2008 Impact Factor 3.308
2007 Impact Factor 3.439
2006 Impact Factor 2.687
2005 Impact Factor 2.071

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 4.77
Cited half-life 4.80
Immediacy index 0.85
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 1.11
Website Molecular Nutrition & Food Research website
Other titles Molecular nutrition & food research (Online), Molecular nutrition and food research
ISSN 1613-4133
OCLC 56493322
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley-VCH Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Upon funder agreement with publisher
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print may be deposited on personal intranet or institutional intranet repository, but not on a public repository
    • Pre-print must not updates with future versions
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrases (See policy)
    • Must link to publisher's site: http://www.interscience.wiley.com/
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Some journal exceptions-check individual homepages
  • Classification
    white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Scope: We have previously demonstrated in mice that a maternal high fat diet during lactation enhances the susceptibility of offspring to obesity and fatty liver. A causative molecule, however, is yet to be identified. Therefore, we examined the role of cholesterol, the dietary intake of which increases with consumption of a high fat diet. Excessive cholesterol intake is involved in the development of fatty liver, which in turn becomes a risk factor for metabolic syndrome, which includes obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. However, our knowledge of the influences on offspring of excessive maternal cholesterol intake alone during pregnancy and lactation is limited. In the present study, we examined how excessive maternal cholesterol intake during lactation influences susceptibility of the offspring to metabolic syndrome in mice. Methods: We examined how excessive maternal cholesterol intake during lactation influences susceptibility of the offspring to metabolic syndrome in mice. Results: High cholesterol intake promoted triacylglycerol accumulation in the liver of offspring (P < 0.05), and elevated expression of molecules involved in hepatic lipoprotein influx was identified as the underlying mechanism. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that excessive maternal cholesterol intake during lactation enhances the susceptibility of the offspring to development of fatty liver. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer, referred to as the 'disease of civilization', continues to haunt humanity due to its dreadful manifestations and limited success of therapeutic interventions such as chemotherapy in curing the disease. Although effective, chemotherapy has repeatedly demonstrated inadequacy in disease management due to its debilitating side effects arising from its deleterious non-specific effects on normal healthy cells. In addition, development of chemoresistance due to mono-targeting often results in cessation of chemotherapy. This urgently demands development and implementation of multi-targeted alternative therapies with mild or no side effects. One extremely promising strategy that yet remains untapped in the clinic is augmenting chemotherapy with dietary phytochemicals or extracts. Ginger, depository of numerous bioactive molecules, not only targets cancer cells but can also mitigate chemotherapy-associated side effects. Consequently, combination therapy involving ginger extract and chemotherapeutic agents may offer the advantage of being efficacious with reduced toxicity. Here we discuss the remarkable and often overlooked potential of ginger extract to manage cancer, the possibility of developing ginger-based combinational therapies, and the major roadblocks along with strategies to overcome them in clinical translation of such inventions. We are optimistic that clinical implementation of such combination regimens would be a much sought after modality in cancer management. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the dose-response relationship of strawberries, an anthocyanin-rich fruit, on postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations in individuals with insulin resistance (IR), including changes in plasma anthocyanins, markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. In a randomized controlled, 4-arm, dose-response, crossover trial, 21 adults with IR consumed a high-carbohydrate, high-fat meal with one of 4 beverages containing: 0 g freeze-dried whole strawberry powder (FDS, control), 10, 20 or 40 g FDS, controlled for fiber. Blood was collected at 0 min and at 30 min intervals post-meal until 2 h, then hourly until 6 h. Post-meal insulin concentrations (6 h) were significantly reduced after the 40 g FDS beverage compared to other beverages (p<0.05). Post-meal 6 h glucose concentrations were not different, although mean insulin:glucose ratio was significantly different among beverages (p<0.05). Pelargonidin-glucuronide was inversely associated with mean insulin concentrations after the 20 and 40 g FDS (p<0.05). Oxidized-LDL was reduced after 20 g FDS (p<0.05) and IL-6 was not different among treatments. Strawberry intake reduced the insulin demand to manage post-meal glucose in obese individuals with IR, which was related to plasma anthocyanin/ pelargonidin concentrations. The data support a role for strawberries in improving insulin sensitivity in people with IR. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Scope: Tomato has become one of the most consumed vegetables worldwide, but its intake is often accompanied by an increasing risk of inducing allergic symptoms. The aims of the work was the identification of new seed-specific allergens associated to severe symptoms in patients allergic to this edible vegetable. Methods and results: We used 22 sera from well-defined tomato-allergic patients. Tomato seed proteins were purified and analysed for biochemical and immunological characterization. A mixture of two associated IgE-binding nsLTPs was purified from tomato seeds. Both allergens, Sola l 7 and Sola l 6, displayed primary structure differences with respect to their counterpart, Sola l 3, from tomato pulp/peel. They retained the ability to bind IgE from 71.4% of patients with severe symptoms. The purified proteins induced positive Basophil Activation Test (BAT) and Skin Prick Test (SPT), and displayed cross-reactivity with homologous allergens from peanut and sunflower seeds, among others. Conclusions: We herein described two novel allergens from tomato seeds that belong to the nsLTP family classes 1 and 2, respectively. This is the first work associating IgE reactivity to these proteins with severe symptoms of certain tomato-allergic patients. Therefore, they are optimal candidates for clarifying the diagnosis of the tomato allergy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Lee W. Wattenberg, who spent his entire career at the University of Minnesota, was a true pioneer in the field of chemoprevention. This paper is a tribute to his groundbreaking research which uncovered the cancer prevention properties of many dietary compounds, including those discussed here in some detail - indole-3-carbinol and diindolylmethane. These compounds occur as glucosinolate conjugates in cruciferous vegetables and are released when one chews or otherwise macerates the vegetable. They have numerous beneficial effects including the ability to prevent cancer in laboratory animals treated with carcinogens. We review some of the early work on indole-3-carbinol and diindolylmethane which spurred subsequent studies on their efficacy and molecular mechanisms of prevention. We also present unique data on field conditions that affect levels of their glucosinolate precursors in vegetables and on the release of diindolylmethane in people who consume cruciferous vegetables. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Scope: The purpose of this study is to characterize how overexpression of an efflux transporter and an UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) affects the cellular kinetics of glucuronidation processes. Methods and results: A new MDCK II cell line overexpressing both MRP2 and UGT1A1 (MDCKII-UGT1A1/MRP2 cells) was developed and used to determine how overexpression of an efflux transporter affects the kinetics of cellular flavonoid glucuronide production. The results showed that most model flavonoids (from a total of 13) were mainly metabolized into glucuronides in the MDCKII-UGT1A1/MRP2 cells and the glucuronides were rapidly excreted. Flavonoids with three or fewer hydroxyl group at 7, 3' or 6 hydroxyl group were also metabolized into sulfates. Mechanistic studies using 7-hydroxylflavone showed that its glucuronide was mainly (90%) effluxed by BCRP with a small (10%) but significant contribution from MRP2. Maximal velocity of glucuronide production MDCK-MRP2/UGT1A1 cells showed a fairly good correlation (R(2) >0.8) with those derived using UGT1A1 microsomes, but other kinetic parameters (e.g., Km ) did not correlate. Conclusion: Overexpression of a second efficient efflux transporter did not significantly change the fact that BCRP is the dominant transporter for flavonoid glucuronide nor did it diminish the influence of the efflux transporter as the "gate keeper" of glucuronidation process. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: We report on the impact of purified dietary meat proteins from four species on plasma insulin, lipid and amino acid (AA) concentrations, and hepatic transcriptome (RNA-sequencing). Young rats received semi-synthetic diets for 1wk that differed only regarding protein source; casein (reference) was replaced by beef, chicken, fish or pork proteins. Compared to casein, all proteins, except pork, increased total plasma AA concentrations. Pork protein reduced adipose tissue mass and liver triacylglycerol, which was accompanied by increased plasma triacylglycerol concentrations. Plasma cholesterol was reduced by fish protein. The number of differentially expressed genes ranged between 609 (pork) and 1,258 (chicken); on average one-third of the changes were specific for each meat protein. Pathway responses were most similar for beef and chicken, followed by pork and fish. Although the extent varied, all meat proteins induced mRNA translation, antigen processing/presentation, intracellular vesicular trafficking and oxidoreductive-transformation pathways, and suppressed signal-transduction (Notch, TGFB/SMAD, insulin) and mitochondrial biogenesis pathways. Lipid- and AA-metabolic pathways were repressed, except by pork. AA-transport pathways were induced by beef and fish only, and complement/coagulation-pathways were suppressed by chicken and beef. Fish suppressed nuclear-transport and cofactor metabolism. To conclude, short-term feeding of different meat proteins resulted in distinct physiological and transcriptome changes in young rats. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Scope: Tumor metastasis greatly contributes to the mortality of prostate cancer. The glucosinolate-derived PEITC has been widely documented to reduce the risk of prostate cancer by modulating multiple biologically relevant processes. Emerging evidence suggests that PEITC may exert its anti-cancer effects through epigenetic mechanisms including microRNAs. Altered levels of miRNA have been linked to tumor malignancy due to their capacity to regulate functional gene expression in carcinogenesis. Here, we assessed the effects of PEITC on miRNA expression which is related to PCa cell invasiveness. Methods and results: Utilizing oligonucleotide microarray first identified the most affected miRNAs in LNCaP cells after PEITC treatment. Several top altered miRNAs were further validated using quantitative PCR. Interestingly, overexpression of miR-194 suppressed PC3 cell invasion in matrigel-coated Transwell chambers. Bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1) was shown to be a direct target of miR-194. Downregulation of BMP1 by miR-194 or PEITC led to decreased expression of key oncogenic matrix metalloproteinases, MMP2 and MMP9. This in turn, resulting in the suppression of tumor invasion. Conclusion: Our results indicate that miR-194 downregulates the expression of oncogenic MMP2 and MMP9 by targeting BMP1, which suggests a potential new mechanistic target by which PEITC suppresses prostate cancer cell invasiveness. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Scope: Probiotics can modulate immunity and reduce upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) in humans; however few studies have examined both outcomes in the same trial. The goal of the current study was to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12, on natural killer (NK) and T cell function in conjunction with self-reported cold/flu outcomes in healthy adults. Methods and results: In a randomized, partially-blinded, 4-period crossover study, healthy adults (n = 30) were recruited, and received 4 treatments for 4 weeks in a random order: A) yogurt smoothies alone (YS); smoothies with BB-12 added B) before (PRE) or C) after (POST) yogurt fermentation, or D) BB-12 capsule (CAP). NK and T cell function was assessed at baseline and after each treatment. Incidence and severity of cold/flu infection was quantified using self-reported URTI questionnaires. Participants on YS, PRE or CAP treatments had elevated interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion and NK cell cytotoxicity, concurrently with fewer days with URTI. However, the POST treatment did not change immune outcomes or the severity of URTI. Conclusion: The timing of BB-12 addition to yogurt smoothies in relation to the fermentation process influenced the impact of BB-12 on immune function and cold/flu severity in young healthy adults. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Scope: This study examined the interaction of fish oil (FO) with dexamethasone on glucose and lipid metabolisms in healthy subjects. Methods and results: The study included 2 consecutive parts. Part A (randomized) in 16 subjects, studied the effects of dexamethasone (2-d, 2 mg.d-1) vs. placebo (lactose), part B (2 parallel subgroups of 8) studied the interaction of FO (3-w, 840 mg.d-1 of EPA + DHA) with dexamethasone. Insulin sensitivity of lipolysis (d5-glycerol infusion + microdialysis), endogenous glucose production and muscle glucose uptake were assessed by a 3-step hot insulin clamp and substrate oxidation by indirect calorimetry. Dexamethasone induced liver and peripheral insulin resistance, an increase in fat oxidation and a decrease in suppression of plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs). FO amplified the effects of dexamethasone by increasing liver and muscle insulin-resistance, by reducing suppression of plasma NEFAs and fat oxidation and by increasing adipose tissue (AT) lipolysis. Conclusion: FO, given at a moderate dose in healthy subjects prior to a very short-term (2-d) low dose of a synthetic glucocorticoid, worsened its deleterious effects on insulin sensitivity. The enhancing effect of FO on fat oxidation and AT lipolysis might be a protective effect towards an increase in fat mass. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Dietary flavanols produce beneficial health effects, and once absorbed, they are recognized as xenobiotics and undergo phase-II enzymatic detoxification. Flavanols health-promoting properties are mainly attributed to their metabolic products. This work aimed to elucidate whether rats of the opposite sex exhibited differences in the metabolism and distribution of ingested flavanols. To accomplish this aim, acute doses of grape seed polyphenols were administered to male and female rats. After 1, 2 and 4 h, plasma, liver, mesenteric white adipose tissue (MWAT), brain and hypothalamus flavanol metabolites were quantified by HPLC-MS/MS. Results indicated important sex-related quantitative differences in plasma and in brain. Moreover, remarkable sex-related differences in the distributions and types of flavanol metabolites were also observed between liver and brain. Therefore, this study demonstrated that sex differentially influences the metabolism and distribution of flavanols throughout the bodies of rats, which may affect the physiological bioactivities of flavanols between males and females. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: The landscape of cancer has changed considerably in past several years, due mainly to aggressive screening, accumulation of data from basic and epidemiological studies, and the advances in translational research. Natural anticancer agents have always been a part and parcel of cancer research. The initial focus on natural anticancer agents was in context of their cancer chemopreventive properties but their ability to selectively target oncogenic signaling pathways has also been recognized. In light of the rapid advancements in our understanding of the role of microRNAs (miRNAs), cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epigenetic events in cancer initiation and progression, a number of natural anticancer agents are showing promise in vitro, in vivo as well as in pre-clinical studies. Moreover, parent structures of natural agents are being extensively modified with the hope of improving efficacy, specificity and bioavailability. In this article we focus on two natural agents, 3,3'-Diindolylmethane and garcinol, along with CDF, a synthetic analog of natural agent curcumin. We showcase how these anticancer agents are changing cancer landscape by modulating novel miRNAs, epigenetic factors and CSC markers. These activities are relevant and being appreciated for overcoming drug resistance and inhibition of metastases, the two overarching clinical challenges in modern medicine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Scope: A number of studies have suggested that higher flavonoid intake is associated with lower cardiovascular mortality. The direct vasodilatory potential of flavonoids is one proposed mechanism for this link. However, the bioavailability of flavonoid aglycones is low. The metabolites of flavonoids could therefore explain/contribute to the effect. Methods and results: We tested a series of quercetin metabolites formed by both human enzymes and colon microflora. In vitro, a number of these metabolites resulted in vasodilation of isolated rat aortic rings, precontracted with norepinephrine. However, 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid /3HPPA/ was clearly the most potent with an effect of about one order better than quercetin or its close methylderivatives, isorhamnetin and tamarixetin. In contrast, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide was void of any effect. The vasodilatory activity of 3HPPA was confirmed by in vivo experiments on both normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats. Subsequent experiments showed that the arterial blood pressure decrease found after 3HPPA was associated with the peripheral action of the compound on vascular beds and was NO-based. Conclusion: This is the first study showing that a metabolite of flavonoids formed by human microflora has haemodynamic effects. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Scope: High glycemic load diets have been associated with increased breast cancer risk in population-based studies, but the evidence is mixed. This investigation determined whether diets differing in glycemic load affected the carcinogenic process using a preclinical model. Methods and results: Human diets, formulated to differ 2-fold in glycemic load, were evaluated in the 1-methyl-nitrosourea-induced (37.5 mg/kg) mammary carcinogenesis model. Cancer incidence (23.3 vs 50.0%, P = 0.032), multiplicity, (0.40 vs 1.03, P = 0.030) and burden, (0.62 vs 1.19 g/rat, P = 0.037) were reduced in the low versus high glycemic load diets, respectively. However, the low glycemic protective effect was attenuated when two purified diets that differed in resistant starch and simulated the glycemic effects of the human diets were fed. Protection was associated with alterations in markers of cell growth regulation. Conclusion: Our findings show that human low or high glycemic load dietary patterns differentially affect the carcinogenic response in a non-diabetic rodent model for breast cancer. However, factors that are associated with these patterns, in addition to dietary carbohydrate availability, appear to account for the differences observed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research
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    ABSTRACT: Scope: Quercetin is reported to reduce blood pressure in hypertensive but not normotensive humans, but the role of endothelial redox signalling in this phenomenon has not been assessed. This study investigated the effects of physiologically-obtainable quercetin concentrations in a human primary cell model of endothelial dysfunction in order to elucidate the mechanism of action of its antihypertensive effects. Methods and results: Angiotensin II (100 nM, 8 h) induced dysfunction, characterised by suppressed nitric oxide availability (85 ± 4% p<0.05) and increased superoxide production (136 ± 5 %, p<0.001). These effects were ablated by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Quercetin (3 μM, 8 h) prevented angiotensin II induced changes in nitric oxide and superoxide levels, but no effect on upon nitric oxide or superoxide in control cells. The NADPH oxidase subunit p47(phox) was increased at the mRNA and protein levels in angiotensin II-treated cells (130 ± 14% of control, p<0.05), which was ablated by quercetin co-treatment. Protein kinase C activity was increased after angiotensin II treatment (136 ± 51%), however this was unaffected by quercetin co-treatment. Conclusions: Physiologically-obtainable quercetin concentrations are capable of ameliorating angiotensin II-induced endothelial nitric oxide and superoxide imbalance via protein kinase C-independent restoration of p47(phox) gene and protein expression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Molecular Nutrition & Food Research