Asia Pacific Education Review (ASIA PAC EDUC REV)

Publisher: Sŏul Taehakkyo. Asia Tʻaepʻyŏngyang Kyoyuk Palchŏn Yŏnʼgudan, Springer Verlag

Current impact factor: 0.84

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2009 Impact Factor 0.25

Additional details

5-year impact 0.43
Cited half-life 3.40
Immediacy index 0.05
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.16
Other titles Asia Pacific education review (Online), APER
ISSN 1598-1037
OCLC 318439420
Material type Document, Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Computer File

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
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    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite the benefits of peer assessment, many teachers are not willing to implement it, particularly for low-achieving students. This study used the theory of planned behaviour to predict pre-service teachers’ intention to use peer assessment for low-achieving students. A total of 229 pre-service teachers in Singapore participated in the survey which consists of eight factors about peer assessment in writing: belief of knowledge source, belief of ability, belief of constructivist assessment, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behaviour control, behavioural intention, and intention for low-achieving students. Structural equation modelling was used to test hypothesized relationships of the eight factors. This study found that pre-service teachers’ beliefs about knowledge source and constructivist assessment significantly influenced their attitude towards peer assessment of writing. In addition, the attitude and perceived behaviour control were significant factors in shaping the intention of peer assessment. Lastly, pre-service teachers’ intention of implementing peer assessment for low-achieving students was influenced by both the intention of peer assessment and the belief of ability.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Asia Pacific Education Review

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this paper was to examine the relationship between school organizational climate and teachers’ job satisfaction. A quantitative survey method was applied, and three broadly hypothesized relationships were tested with a sample of 245 teachers from six government secondary schools in district of Penampang, Sabah, Malaysia. The instrument used in this study was the modified version for combination of two questionnaires: Organizational Climate Index and the Teachers’ Job Satisfaction Questionnaire. The findings indicated that there is a significant positive relationship between school organizational climate and teachers’ job satisfaction. The teachers in this study were found to be fairly satisfied with their job, with the responsibility factor as the biggest contributor to job satisfaction. This study found that there is no significant difference in levels of job satisfaction between the teachers’ gender (male and female). Based on the years of service in their current school, there was a statically significant difference in the level of job satisfaction among the teachers. These findings revealed that the secondary schools in Sabah have a positive and open climate, with the professional teachers’ behaviour factor as the biggest contributor. The results of this study indicate the necessity to provide positive organizational climate and up keeping teachers’ job satisfaction by policy makers and principals with hope in enhancing the quality of schools in Malaysia. © 2016 Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: Two research questions guided this study of teacher selection: (a) What characteristics do Chinese principals look for when hiring teachers? And (b) what is the effect of participants’ gender, experience, or school location on perceived characteristics of effective teacher candidates in hiring? Both interviews and a questionnaire survey were used to collect data from a southwest city of Shandong Province, China. In this mixed design study, quantitative results were consistent with the qualitative results. Additionally, the study results are intended to help readers better understand school principals’ perceived characteristics of effective teachers in a Chinese context and provides a framework for future comparative research between China and the USA. © 2016 Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of the curriculum developed in line with authentic learning on the teacher candidates’ success, attitudes towards courses and self-directed learning skills. The study, that is quantitative in nature, is carried out with 64 teacher candidates studying at Near East University and taking the course of “curriculum development”. During the implementation which lasted 12 weeks, while the experimental group was implemented with the curriculum developed in line with authentic learning, the control group was implemented with a traditional curriculum. The results obtained from the research have indicated that the curriculum developed in line with authentic learning has increased the success of the teacher candidates. Also, there has been a meaningful difference in the attitudes of teacher candidates towards the course of curriculum development. Yet, the same developed curriculum has increased the self-directed learning skills of teacher candidates from a moderate level to a high level.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have identified many school variables which can have significant effect on academic optimism. However, most of these identified variables are leadership or psychological constructs; thus, it is often too abstract for school administrators to translate into real practice. Therefore, this study adopted the perspective of school resources and investments to examine to what extent is academic optimism determined by school preexisting conditions, and what school investments can promote it. The data were collected from a sample of 3672 teachers from 326 junior high schools in Taiwan. A hierarchical regression analysis was used to address research questions. The results indicated that school resource, the preexisting conditions of a school, only has marginal effect on academic optimism. It is school investment that has the majority of the impact on academic optimism. The study further identified that the school investment in Internet connection, awards for student learning, parent education, teacher professional development and its incentives can have significant effect on academic optimism. The paper contributes to better understanding of the nature of academic optimism and indicates what school investments educational practitioner can focus on to foster the culture of academic optimism. © 2015 Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: The use of virtual learning environments (VLEs) has become more common and educators recognized the potential of VLEs as educational environments. The learning community in VLEs can be a mixture of people from all over the world with different cultural backgrounds. However, despite many studies about the use of virtual environments for learning, there has been little research on the perspectives of both instructors and students from different cultural backgrounds toward using a VLE. Thus, to gain insight into both instructors’ and students’ perspectives with different cultural backgrounds toward using a VLE, this paper conducted a qualitative exploratory case study. For more interactive learning, the VLE of the study was designed in Second Life which is one of the 3D VLEs and equipped with screen sharing software. In addition, one facilitator provided the technical and language translation support throughout the research process. Then, this paper also endeavored to determine educational implications of this new approach based on its findings. © 2015 Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: This article looks at the central and local governments’ policymaking and implementation of compulsory education for migrant children in China. Three distinct models of policy implementation were identified through a case study approach. They indicated a selective adaptation of central policy objective and principles by the local governments and revealed diverse conditions of compulsory education for migrant children across the nation. In spite of substantial improvement over the years, migrant children still could not receive equitable compulsory education as urban children, due to three system barriers in general and local policy differences in particular. © 2015 Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: The learning analytics dashboard (LAD) is a newly developed learning support tool for virtual classrooms that is believed to allow students to review their online learning behavior patterns intuitively through the provision of visual information. The purpose of this study was to empirically validate the effects of LAD. An experimental study was conducted with a dashboard treatment group and a control group. The researchers developed a LAD and evaluated its effectiveness on the sample of 151 college students at a private university located in Korea, who were taking the online course titled “Management Statistics” in the first semester of 2014. The following results were obtained. First, the students who received dashboard treatment presented higher final score than those who did not. Second, the dashboard usage frequency, as measured by the number of times the dashboard was opened, did not have a significant impact on learning achievement. However, a slightly positive correlation between satisfaction with LAD and learning achievement was observed. Further analysis indicated that learners who used the dashboard only a few times showed relatively high satisfaction with LAD. On the other hand, high academic achievers who opened LAD relatively frequently showed lower satisfaction with dashboard. The results guide that LAD should be revised in a way to motivate learners consistently and support learners who have different academic achievement levels. The study discusses the further research tasks in terms of LAD development as an effective and personalized feedback tool to improve learners’ academic achievement. © 2015 Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to provide information about the quality of the evidence on reading fluency instruction for at-risk students and students with reading/learning disabilities as a way to evaluate whether an instructional strategy is evidence-based and has potential for classroom use. An extensive search process with inclusion and exclusion criteria yielded a total of 18 studies to be included in the present study: 12 group design studies and six single-subject design studies. The quality indicators proposed by Gersten et al. (Except Child 71:149–164, 2005) and Horner et al. (Except Child 71:165–179, 2005) were applied to evaluate the quality of selected fluency intervention studies. Results revealed that (a) most group design studies provided little information about the intervention and agent for the comparison group, (b) internal and social validity were not clearly stated in single-subject design studies, and (c) procedural fidelity in assessment and intervention implementation was inadequately addressed in both group design and single-subject design studies. Lack of methodological rigor, which hampers determinations of the effectiveness of fluency instruction, the current status of intervention studies, and future directions are discussed. © 2015 Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past two decades, the concepts of educational creativity and leadership have attracted tremendous attention throughout East Asia. Driven in large part by isomorphic tendencies within a global organizational environment, the two ideas have also acquired the trappings of institutional myth. Often overlooked in the schools literature, however, are the strong conceptual similarity and interconnection between creativity and leadership. Of particular note in East Asian schools is the intrinsic tension they share between being understood as properties of formal or ascribed status and as natural human characteristics. Based on the prior literature, examples, and analysis, this conceptual paper: (1) examines the “twin concept” nature of creativity and leadership within schools, proposing that they be understood less in terms of formal or ascribed status and more as vectors of natural activity within school organizations; (2) suggests ways in which East Asian school reform movements can take advantage of such activity; and (3) raises questions regarding the meaning of “reform” in East Asian schools. © 2015 Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the sources of satisfaction and frustration among Malaysian academics across three types of higher education institutions (HEIs)—public research university, public comprehensive university and private non-profit university. Based on interview with 67 academics across six HEIs, there is a clear pattern and relationship between the sources of satisfaction and frustration and the types of institutions these academics were affiliated. The major sources of satisfaction are related to the nature of academic work, which includes supervising, mentoring, teaching and interacting with students, as well as conducting research and disseminating knowledge through publication. However, the major sources of frustration are predominantly related to the governance of higher education, resulting from unrealistic expectations, lack of transparency of the promotion and reward system, and a strong bureaucratic culture. The understanding of satisfaction and frustration has helped us to understand issues of morale, retention and, possibly, productivity of academics across these HEIs, and in turn, the understanding of these issues about academics has implications in understanding the governing structure of HEIs. Although this study is limited only to HEIs in Malaysia, the findings have wider implications in contributing to the understanding of governance and academic culture in the broader context of higher education. © 2015 Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Asia Pacific Education Review
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    ABSTRACT: In the Philippines, students seeking admission to a university are usually required to meet certain entrance requirements, including passing the entrance examinations with questions on IQ and English, mathematics, and science. This paper aims to determine the factors that affect the performance of entrants into business programmes in high-stakes test. Three groups of factors were considered: personal, family, and school factors. A total of 1,057 freshmen enrolled in a business college in academic year 2013–2014 answered a researcher-developed instrument to capture data, which were analysed using multiple regression analysis. Academic library use, reading, and involvement in extra-curricular activities among the personal factors; family size, socio-economic status, and parental involvement among the family factors were found to have significant relationship with entrance test results. As to school factors, the type of school affects entrants’ performance in the test. © 2015 Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Asia Pacific Education Review