International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education (Int J Sci Math Educ)

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Journal description

The objective of this journal is to publish original, fully peer-reviewed articles on a variety of topics and research methods in both science and mathematics education. The journal welcomes articles that address common issues in mathematics and science education and cross-curricular dimensions more widely. Specific attention will be paid to manuscripts written by authors whose native language is not English and the editors have made arrangements for support in re-writing where appropriate. Contemporary educators highlight the importance of viewing knowledge as context-oriented and not limited to one domain. This concurs with current curriculum reforms worldwide for interdisciplinary and integrated curricula. Modern educational practice also focuses on the use of new technology in assisting instruction which may be easily implemented into such an integrated curriculum. The journal welcomes studies that explore science and mathematics education from different cultural perspectives.

Current impact factor: 0.69

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 4.30
Immediacy index 0.05
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education website
Other titles International journal of science and mathematics education (Online), IJSME
ISSN 1571-0068
OCLC 53191065
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • Areti Panaoura · Paraskevi Michael-Chrysanthou · Athanasios Gagatsis · Iliada Elia · Andreas Philippou

    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: There is growing interest, worldwide, in collaboration between schools and community organisations in contributing to and enriching school science programs, yet such collaborations are inadequately understood. This paper reports data from an Australian study designed to probe the views of members of the community who have participated in a broad range of such collaborations in school science programmes in order to better understand the issues which impact on their operation. The data were collected by interviews with the community participants selected by opportunistic sampling. The analysis reveals a number of issues—purposes, communication, organisational structures and curriculum—which can be seen as impacting on the collaborations. These are examined through the concepts of communities of practice, boundaries and boundary crossing, associated with people from scientific communities of practice interacting with school communities. The paper reflects on the implications of these findings for constructing effective school-community collaboration in school science programs.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: Integrated curricula have become a major educational focus in Korea. Policy changes began in 2009 when the Korea Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology announced a new curriculum incorporating Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM). Various stages of educational reform have occurred since that time. This study represents the first opportunity for readers of English-language journals to learn about these changes. The aims of the current study are to demonstrate the potential for engaging elementary school pre-service teachers in development of STEAM lesson plans within a science methods course and to elucidate the challenges in this instructional approach. Participants were 119 elementary pre-service teachers in their third year of study at a national university in Korea. Results show that developing STEAM lesson plans had a positive influence on elementary pre-service teachers’ attitudes toward STEAM. Specifically, we found significant improvement on a pre-post survey for participants’ awareness, perceived ability, value, and commitment for STEAM. Secondly, qualitative coding analysis of open-ended surveys revealed pre-service teachers’ views of the potential benefits and challenges of developing STEAM lesson plans. Finally, we provide a rubric for evaluating pre-service teachers’ STEAM lesson plans, based on our experience with teaching this skill within a science methods course.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: Although a major goal of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education is to develop scientific literacy, prior efforts at measuring scientific literacy have not attempted to link scientific literacy with success in STEM fields. The current Scientific Literacy Survey for College Preparedness in STEM (SLSCP-STEM) scale was specifically developed to predict the academic preparedness of incoming freshman STEM majors. The SLSCP-STEM was developed within the context of utilitarian scientific literacy and allows independent assessment of three dimensions of scientific literacy: (a) attitudinal and behavioral domains of scientific literacy, (b) content knowledge of scientific concepts, and (c) scientific reasoning skills. This paper presents the theoretical framework for the development of the scale along with supporting data on its validity and reliability. The SLSCP-STEM demonstrated reliability including tests of internal consistency [attitude/behavior dimension (α = .86), content knowledge dimension (α = .73), scientific reasoning dimension (α = .72)] and instrument stability over time [attitude/behavior dimension (r = 0.88, p < .01), content knowledge dimension (r = 0.74, p < .01), scientific reasoning dimension (r = 0.80, p < .01)]. Furthermore, content validity, tested with expert science faculty members, demonstrated that the content knowledge sections were relevant for freshman STEM majors. Finally, item analysis verified appropriate item difficulty level and item discrimination.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: This mixed methods study examined an association between cognitive types of teachers’ mathematical content knowledge and students’ performance in lower secondary schools (grades 5 through 9). Teachers (N = 90) completed the Teacher Content Knowledge Survey (TCKS), which consisted of items measuring different cognitive types of teacher knowledge. The first cognitive type (T1) assessed participants’ knowledge of basic facts and procedures. The second cognitive type (T2) measured teachers’ understanding of concepts and connections. The third cognitive type (T3) gauged teachers’ knowledge of mathematical models and generalizations. The study comprised two levels of quantitative data analysis. First, we explored each cognitive type of teachers’ content knowledge and the overall TCKS score as they related to student performance. Second, we studied the correlation between each cognitive type of teacher content knowledge to deepen the understanding of content associations. Results of the study show a statistically significant correlation between cognitive types T1 and T2 of teacher content knowledge and student performance (p < .05). The correlation between cognitive type T3 and student performance was not significant (p = .0678). The most substantial finding was the correlation between teachers’ total score on the TCKS and student performance (Pearson’s r = .2903, p = .0055 < .01). These results suggest that teachers’ content knowledge plays an important role in student performance at the lower secondary school. The qualitative phase included structured interviews with two of the teacher participants in order to further elaborate on the nature of the quantitative results of the study.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: Conflicting explanations and unrelated information in science classrooms increase cognitive load and decrease efficiency in learning. This reduced efficiency ultimately limits one’s ability to solve reasoning problems in the science. In reasoning, it is the ability of students to sift through and identify critical pieces of information that is of paramount importance in science and learning. Unfortunately, the ability to accomplish the identification of critical ideas is not one that develops without practice and assistance form teachers or tutors in the classroom. The purpose of this paper is to examine how the application of an evolutionary algorithm works within a cognitive computational model to solve problems in the science classroom and simulate human reasoning for research purposes. The research question is: does the combination of optimization algorithms and cognitive computational algorithms successfully mimic biological teaching and learning systems in the science classroom? Within this computational study, the author outlines and simulates the effects of teaching and learning on the ability of a “virtual” student to solve a science task. Using the STAC-M computational model the author completes a computational experiment that examines the role of cognitive retraining on student learning. The author also discusses the important limitations of this powerful new tool.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: In this article, attempts were made to examine students’ thinking about the concepts of infinity and their ideas about transiting from finite to infinite states through the concept of limits of sequences. The participants included 78 senior high-school students ranging in age between 17 and 19 years old. The data were collected through a questionnaire and an interview with all of the subjects. The findings showed that the students’ understanding of infinity is related to finite situations and many students consider infinite processes as a generalized form of finite processes. In the present study, the most common mistakes committed by students were related to consideration of infinity as a number and application of known finite results to infinite states.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: In an undergraduate Calculus III class, we explore the effect of “flipping” the instructional delivery of content on both student performance and student perceptions. Two instructors collaborated to determine daily lecture notes, assigned the same homework problems, and gave identical exams; however, compared to a more traditional instructional approach, the flipped instructor utilized videos to communicate more procedural course content to students out-of-class, with time in-class spent on more conceptual activities and homework problems. Findings from two semesters indicate similar performance on more procedural problems and small to moderate gains for the flipped students (N = 74) over their traditional counterparts (N = 77) on more conceptual exam problems. However, student perceptions remain mixed, with flipped students reporting increased communication during class but traditional students perceiving more effective use of class time, despite the gains in performance for flipped students.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to understand enrollment and performance differences between male and females in higher level secondary STEM courses. This study analyzes performance and enrollment of 355,688 secondary students in higher level STEM courses. This research also enabled an exploration of country level differences. The enrollment research questions are evaluated using chi-square tests, frequency tables, and histograms. Performance research questions are analyzed with hierarchical linear regression and ANOVA with post hocs and Cohen’s d effect size measures. Results suggest that females enroll much less frequently in higher level secondary STEM courses. Females and males perform equally well.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: This study explored the influence of experimental goal setting and planning on the attitudes toward science, self-efficacy, inquiry performance, and achievement of students with low academic performance. A total of 71 students aged 16–18 were randomly divided into a treatment group (with goal setting and planning) and a control group (without goal setting and planning). A microcomputer-based laboratory focused on Boyle’s Law, coupled with an inquiry worksheet, was assigned. Based on Winne and Hadwin’s model of self-regulated learning, scaffolding was offered to the treatment group to promote goal setting and planning. Data were collected from the worksheet, the Attitudes toward Science Scale, the Self-efficacy of Scientific Inquiry scale, and the Boyle’s Law Conceptual Test. The results showed that both the treatment and control groups improved significantly from the pre- to post-conceptual tests. In the treatment group, the male students gained significantly more conceptual knowledge than the female students. Regarding attitudes toward science, the male students’ scores on the post-test were higher than those of the females. It is concluded that the male students were more positive regarding goal setting and planning in the inquiry activity, whereas the female students did not benefit as much.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores final-year physical sciences preservice teachers’ religious and scientific views regarding the origin of the universe and life. Data was obtained from 10 preservice teachers from individual in-depth interviews conducted at the end of the Science Method module. Their viewpoints were analyzed using coding, sorting, and categorizing. They attributed the origin of the universe and life to a blend of theistic, intelligent design or scientific beliefs. Moreover, their academic backgrounds, exposure to topics in Cosmology in the Science Method module, and classroom dialogues did not significantly influence or change their original religious beliefs. However, the dialogues did create an awareness of their own reflected positions regarding the tenacity of beliefs in religion and their inadequate cosmological understandings. The paper has implications for Science Education in addressing preservice teachers’ religious beliefs in contrast to scientific evidence.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
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    ABSTRACT: Theoretically, it has been argued that a conscious understanding of metacognitive knowledge requires that this knowledge is explicit and systematic. The purpose of this descriptive study was to obtain a better understanding of explicitness and systematicity in knowledge of the mathematical problem-solving process. Eighteen 11th-grade pre-university students solved two kinds of complex mathematical thinking problems that included the finding of a solution and the writing of mathematical texts and arguments. They also answered open-ended questions to obtain reasoned and reflective accounts regarding their metacognitive knowledge. Content analysis indicated 4 levels of explicitness and 5 levels of systematicity. Quantitizing of the accounts provided for a strong positive correlation with mathematical performance. It is concluded that explicitness and systematicity appeared to be potential indicators of the participants’ understanding of effective problem-solving strategies.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education