DNA repair (DNA Repair)

Publisher: Elsevier

Current impact factor: 3.11

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 3.111
2013 Impact Factor 3.362
2012 Impact Factor 4.274
2011 Impact Factor 4.135
2010 Impact Factor 4.293
2009 Impact Factor 4.199
2008 Impact Factor 5.095
2007 Impact Factor 4.018
2006 Impact Factor 5.868
2005 Impact Factor 5.016
2004 Impact Factor 3.92
2003 Impact Factor 3.277

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.46
Cited half-life 6.40
Immediacy index 0.90
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 1.44
ISSN 1568-7856

Publisher details

Elsevier

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    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
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  • Conditions
    • Authors pre-print on any website, including arXiv and RePEC
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Author's post-print may be used to update arXiv and RepEC
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Author's post-print must be released with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/06/2015
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: DNA mismatch repair influences the outcome of recombination events between diverging DNA sequences. Here we discuss how mismatch repair proteins are active in different homologous recombination subpathways and specific reaction steps, resulting in differential modulation of these recombination events, with a focus on the mechanism of heteroduplex rejection during the inhibition of recombination between slightly diverged (homeologous) DNA sequences.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: The machinery of DNA mismatch repair enzymes is highly conserved in evolution. The process is initiated by recognition of a DNA mismatch, and validated by ATP and the presence of a processivity clamp or a methylation mark. Several events in MMR promote conformational changes that lead to progression of the repair process. Here we discuss functional conformational changes in the MMR proteins and we compare the enzymes to paralogs in other systems.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: The mismatch repair (MMR) family complexes Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 act with Exo1 and Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 in a meiotic double strand break repair pathway that results in the asymmetric cleavage of double Holliday junctions (dHJ) to form crossovers. This review discusses how meiotic roles for Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 do not fit paradigms established for post-replicative MMR. We also outline models used to explain how these factors promote the formation of meiotic crossovers required for the accurate segregation of chromosome homologs during the Meiosis I division.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: We have currently entered a genomic era of cancer research which may soon lead to a genomic era of cancer treatment. Patient DNA sequencing information may lead to a personalized approach to managing an individual's cancer as well as future cancer risk. The success of this approach, however, begins not necessarily in the clinician's office, but rather at the laboratory bench of the basic scientist. The basic scientist plays a critical role since the DNA sequencing information is of limited use unless one knows the function of the gene that is altered and the manner by which a sequence alteration affects that function. The role of basic science research in aiding the clinical management of a disease is perhaps best exemplified by considering the case of Lynch syndrome, a hereditary disease that predisposes patients to colorectal and other cancers. This review will examine how the diagnosis, treatment and even prevention of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers has benefitted from extensive basic science research on the DNA mismatch repair genes whose alteration underlies this condition.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: The RecQ helicases play important roles in genome maintenance and DNA metabolism (replication, recombination, repair, and transcription). Five different homologs are present in humans, three of which are implicated in accelerated aging genetic disorders: Rothmund Thomson (RECQL4), Werner (WRN), and Bloom (BLM) syndromes. While the DNA helicase activities of the 5 human RecQ helicases have been extensively characterized, much less is known about their DNA double strand annealing activities. Strand annealing is an important integral enzymatic activity in DNA metabolism, including DNA repair. Here, we have characterized the strand annealing activities of all five human RecQ helicase proteins and compared them. Interestingly, the relative strand annealing activities of the five RecQ proteins are not directly (inversely) related to their helicase activities. RECQL5 possesses relatively strong annealing activity on long or small duplexed substrates compared to the other RecQs. Additionally, the strand annealing activity of RECQL5 is not inhibited by the presence of ATP, unlike the other RecQs. We also show that RECQL5 efficiently catalyzes annealing of RNA to DNA in vitro in the presence or absence of ATP, revealing a possible new function for RECQL5. Additionally, we investigate how different known RecQ interacting proteins, RPA, Ku, FEN1 and RAD51, regulate their strand annealing activity. Collectively, we find that the human RecQ proteins possess differential DNA double strand annealing activities and we speculate on their individual roles in DNA repair. This insight is important in view of the many cellular DNA metabolic actions of the RecQ proteins and elucidates their unique functions in the cell.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) machinery in mammals plays critical roles in both mutation avoidance and spermatogenesis. Meiotic analysis of knockout mice of two different MMR genes, Mlh1 and Mlh3, revealed both male and female infertility associated with a defect in meiotic crossing over. In contrast, another MMR gene knockout, Pms2 (Pms2ko/ko ), which contained a deletion of a portion of the ATPase domain, produced animals that were male sterile but female fertile. However, the meiotic phenotype of Pms2ko/ko males was less clear-cut than for Mlh1- or Mlh3-deficient meiosis. More recently, we generated a different Pms2 mutant allele (Pms2cre ), which results in deletion of the same portion of the ATPase domain. Surprisingly, Pms2cre/cre male mice were completely fertile, suggesting that the ATPase domain of Pms2 is not required for male fertility. To explore the difference in male fertility, we examined the Pms2 RNA and found that alternative splicing of the Pms2cre allele results in a predicted Pms2 containing the C-terminus, which contains the Mlh1-interaction domain, a possible candidate for stabilizing Mlh1 levels. To study further the basis of male fertility, we examined Mlh1 levels in testes and found that whereas Pms2 loss in Pms2ko/ko mice results in severely reduced levels of Mlh1 expression in the testes, Mlh1 levels in Pms2cre/cre testes were reduced to a lesser extent. Thus, we propose that a primary function of Pms2 during spermatogenesis is to stabilize Mlh1 levels prior to its critical crossing over function with Mlh3.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a surveillance mechanism present in most living organisms, which repairs errors introduced by DNA polymerases. Importantly, loss of MMR function due to inactivating mutations and/or epigenetic silencing results in the accumulation of mutations and as consequence increased cancer susceptibility, as observed in Lynch syndrome patients. During the past decades important progress has been made in the MMR field resulting in the identification and characterization of essential MMR components, culminating in the in vitro reconstitution of 5' and 3' nick-directed MMR. However, several mechanistic aspects of the MMR reaction remain not fully understood, therefore alternative approaches and further investigations are needed. Recently, the use of imaging techniques and, more specifically, visualization of MMR components in living cells, has broadened our mechanistic understanding of the repair reaction providing more detailed information about the spatio-temporal organization of MMR in vivo. In this review we would like to comment on mechanistic aspects of the MMR reaction in light of these and other recent findings. Moreover, we will discuss the current limitations and provide future perspectives regarding imaging of mismatch repair components in diverse organisms.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: MutLα is a key component of the DNA mismatch repair system in eukaryotes. The DNA mismatch repair system has several genetic stabilization functions. Of these functions, DNA mismatch repair is the major one. The loss of MutLα abolishes DNA mismatch repair, thereby predisposing humans to cancer. MutLα has an endonuclease activity that is required for DNA mismatch repair. The endonuclease activity of MutLα depends on the DQHA(X)2E(X)4E motif which is a part of the active site of the nuclease. This motif is also present in many bacterial MutL and eukaryotic MutLγ proteins, DNA mismatch repair system factors that are homologous to MutLα. Recent studies have shown that yeast MutLγ and several MutL proteins containing the DQHA(X)2E(X)4E motif possess endonuclease activities. Here, we review the endonuclease activities of MutLα and its homologs in the context of DNA mismatch repair.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: DNA mismatch repair (MMR) repairs mispaired bases in DNA generated by replication errors. MutS or MutS homologs recognize mispairs and coordinate with MutL or MutL homologs to direct excision of the newly synthesized DNA strand. In most organisms, the signal that discriminates between the newly synthesized and template DNA strands has not been definitively identified. In contrast, Escherichia coli and some related gammaproteobacteria use a highly elaborated methyl-directed MMR system that recognizes Dam methyltransferase modification sites that are transiently unmethylated on the newly synthesized strand after DNA replication. Evolution of methyl-directed MMR is characterized by the acquisition of Dam and the MutH nuclease and by the loss of the MutL endonuclease activity. Methyl-directed MMR is present in a subset of Gammaproteobacteria belonging to the orders Enterobacteriales, Pasteurellales, Vibrionales, Aeromonadales, and a subset of the Alteromonadales (the EPVAA group) as well as in gammaproteobacteria that have obtained these genes by horizontal gene transfer, including the medically relevant bacteria Fluoribacter, Legionella, and Tatlockia and the marine bacteria Methylophaga and Nitrosococcus.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: The enzyme activation-induced deaminase (AID) targets the immunoglobulin loci in activated B cells and creates DNA mutations in the antigen-binding variable region and DNA breaks in the switch region through processes known, respectively, as somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination. AID deaminates cytosine to uracil in DNA to create a U:G mismatch. During somatic hypermutation, the MutSα complex binds to the mismatch, and the error-prone DNA polymerase η generates mutations at A and T bases. During class switch recombination, both MutSα and MutLα complexes bind to the mismatch, resulting in double-strand break formation and end-joining. This review is centered on the mechanisms of how the MMR pathway is commandeered by B cells to generate antibody diversity.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: Within a decade the family of AlkB dioxygenases has been extensively studied as a one-protein DNA/RNA repair system in Escherichia coli but also as a group of proteins of much wider functions in eukaryotes. Two strains, HK82 and BS87, are the most commonly used E. coli strains for the alkB gene mutations. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of these alkB mutants in different aspects of research on AlkB dioxygenases that function not only in alkylated DNA repair but also in other metabolic processes in cells. Using of HK82 and BS87 strains, we found the following differences among these alkB - derivatives: (i) HK82 has shown more than 10-fold higher MMS-induced mutagenesis in comparison to BS87; (ii) different specificity of Arg+ revertants; (iii) increased induction of SOS and Ada responses in HK82; (iv) the genome of HK82, in comparison to AB1157 and BS87, contains additional mutations: nalA, sbcC, and nuoC. We hypothesize that in HK82 these mutations, together with the non-functional AlkB protein, may result in much higher contents of ssDNA, thus higher in comparison to BS87 MMS-induced mutagenesis.In the light of our findings, we strongly recommend using BS87 strain in AlkB research as HK82, bearing several additional mutations in its genome, is not an exact derivative of the AB1157 strain, and shows additional features that may disturb proper interpretation of obtained results.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are the cause of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome (HNPCC/LS) one of the most common cancer predisposition syndromes, and defects in MMR are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. In the past, the generation and analysis of mouse lines with knockout mutations in all of the known MMR genes has provided insight into how loss of individual MMR genes affects genome stability and contributes to cancer susceptibility. These studies also revealed essential functions for some of the MMR genes in B cell maturation and fertility. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the cancer predisposition phenotypes of recently developed mouse models with targeted mutations in MutS and MutL homologs (Msh and Mlh, respectively) and their utility as preclinical models. The focus will be on mouse lines with conditional MMR mutations that have allowed more accurate modeling of human cancer syndromes in mice and that together with new technologies in gene targeting, hold great promise for the analysis of MMR-deficient intestinal tumors and other cancers which will drive the development of preventive and therapeutic treatment strategies.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)•(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: The DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR) pathway is a fundamental cellular process required to repair mispaired bases introduced routinely during DNA replication. Given this critical role in the maintenance of genome stability, it is not surprising that underlying defects in the MMR pathway occur in both hereditary and sporadic cancers. Furthermore, the MMR status greatly influences the sensitivity of cells to many common chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, novel strategies are being investigated to exploit the loss of MMR in these cancers and to identify personalized therapeutic strategies to target MMR deficient tumours. In this review, we describe recent advances in strategies to target MMR deficient tumours using a synthetic lethal approach. We discuss new ways to target mutations secondary to MMR deficiency and suggest potential new therapies to optimise treatment outcome. We highlight ongoing clinical studies focussing on novel ways of preventing and treating MMR deficient cancers.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · DNA repair