Library Trends

Publisher: University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign campus). Library School; University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign campus). Graduate School of Library Science; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Graduate School of Library Science; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Graduate School of Library and Information Science, Johns Hopkins University Press

Current impact factor: 0.39

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.57
Cited half-life 9.20
Immediacy index 0.07
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.18
Other titles Library trends (Online), Library trends
ISSN 1559-0682
OCLC 60615603
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Johns Hopkins University Press

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website, departmental website or institutional repository
    • On a non-profit server
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • In open access repositories, such as PubMed Central if required by law
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used
    • Reviewed on 03/02/14
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This introduction to Luciano Floridi’s philosophy of information (PI) provides a short overview of Floridi’s work and its reception by the library and information studies (LIS) community, brief definitions of some important PI concepts, and illustrations of Floridi’s three suggested applications of PI to library and information studies. It suggests that LIS may just be as important to PI as PI is to LIS in terms of deepening our mutual understanding of information ontologies, the dynamics of informational domains, and the variety of evolving relationships among information organisms and information objects.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Africa, in colonial times regarded as the “Dark Continent,” faces many challenges, whether infrastructural, cultural, or political. De- spite these challenges, countries on the continent cannot afford to be complacent. The digital divide between Africa and the Western world, with its new technological innovations, has been widening. Librarianship as a discipline is invariably affected by this divide. Since having embraced a Western model of librarianship, the question is whether there can be talk of African librarianship, or a librarianship for Africa. This conceptual dilemma is further explored by a discus- sion of development, the role of the library, training in library and information science (LIS), the relationship between librarianship and information science, and imperatives for the future. While it is acknowledged that new information technologies are important for development, this should not be embraced at the expense of tradi- tional values of librarianship. It is argued that precolonial Africa has had a rich heritage of library scholarship; perhaps a rethink of this is needed, as well as a critical theory in LIS, for an understanding of an African-centered approach to librarianship instead of adopting the Western model, as has been the case for decades. It is therefore imperative to prevent LIS isolationism.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To provide an expos of digital-age library and information science (US) education for an African agenda, this paper adopts an emergent qualitative research design by drawing on the literature on US education in Africa. It also draws on data gleaned from a survey of heads of schools of LIS in South Africa, and from content analyses of LIS school websites in South Africa and selected parts of the continent. The paper locates its narrative within Abbott's chaos of disciplines theory and concludes that the US discipline's "interstitial nature," its "fractal distinctions in time," and the resulting chaos of disciplines should not be seen as a crisis for LIS education in Africa and globally, but as an opportunity for a paradigm shift to broaden the US disciplinary domain and to stake an intellectual claim on this extended domain and so contribute to the growth and development of US services in Africa within the context of an African development agenda.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Library development in Africa has involved large-scale processes of innovation and policy transfer, also referred to as policy borrowing or policy learning. A good deal of theory has been developed in various disciplines to study these processes. This has not been applied in library and information services (LIS) to any significant extent, but it can help us to gain a better understanding of why attempts to transfer new ideas fail, how to select the ideas we want to transfer, and how to improve the chances of successful innovation and policy transfer. This paper places policy transfer within the broader framework of the diffusion of innovations before considering what we can learn from the theory of policy transfer and related processes, with emphasis on theory developed in comparative education. An attempt is made to apply these insights to library development in Africa and draw some lessons for African library decision makers. Some of the examples are drawn from the author’s experience in the South African library profession.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper traces the important developments in school librarianship in South Africa since 2007, during which time the drive to address huge backlogs in school library provision has gained momentum largely, it argues, from the intersections of two phenomena: the Library and Information Services (LIS) Transformation Charter, and Equal Education, a civic-action NGO campaigning on behalf of school libraries. South African youth face daunting challenges, and their schooling is perhaps where the heritage of apartheid is most visible. The lack of libraries, it is argued, has undermined the attempts at curricular reform since the late 1990s. The daunting backlogs in school library provision mean that innovative models of service will be needed that cut across existing divisions. Given the impact of the lack of school libraries on all sectors of US, the paper examines the recommendations in the US Transformation Charter that South African US should turn to the concept of ecosystem to provide the framework for concerted action.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: African librarianship has its roots in the colonial era, with colonial powers developing excellent library infrastructure with commensu- rate services in anticipation of their protracted stay in Africa. How- ever, libraries were alien to African communities, which had a very strong oral tradition and used such a tradition to share information and knowledge. The “un-African” library infrastructure was chal- lenged by some leading African scholars, who argued that there has to be a system of librarianship that delivers on African realities and imperatives. This paper interrogates the need to transform the concept of African librarianship in search of a path that addresses African imperatives; it also examines the need to separate the relic in pursuit of reconceptualization. There is little doubt that there is a need for, at the least, a hybrid—that is, incorporating the best from the colonial era with that which is African, such as the oral tradition—that would result in the transposition of concepts to create a new, relevant, effective, and efficient form of librarianship—namely, librarianship in Africa.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Knowledge, as a prerequisite for development, is contingent on information. The main value of information is in its ability to be used, reused, and shared. Open access (OA) allows for the easy dissemination and preservation of information by providing all scholarly communication and knowledge at no cost to the end user. In the rapidly expanding, global knowledge-based economy, Africa's steady progress from the peripheral to the epicenter of knowledge production is not to be ignored, not least because of its reliance on OA. Such access environments and institutional repositories throughout the continent are playing significant roles in maximizing the impact of research output. This paper reveals that OA content is more citable, not simply because of the quality of the output, but instead of the advantage that OA brings in maximizing accessibility and increased citation. It goes on to show that OA will enhance the research community's existing system for evaluating and rewarding research productivity. Ultimately, OA has the ability to elevate (South) Africa, its universities and institutions, to the status of knowledge producers rather than mere knowledge consumers.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper traces the establishment of African national libraries and the functions with which they are charged. It further discusses the self-examination and evaluation that national libraries, and African librarians in general, have undertaken over the years in a bid to ensure that they provide relevant services to their communities. The effects of the national libraries' commitment to support their respective countries' efforts to attain the UN's Millennium Development Goals by 2015 and their responses to the increasing use of ICTs in all aspects of life are both analyzed. Examples of best practices are given, and the paper concludes with a call to national libraries to look into the future and devise the best ways to provide the supportive role that will help to carry the Sustainable Development Agenda forward beyond 2015.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The focus of this paper is on library development in contemporary African society. A discussion of library development in the context of countries now enjoying rapid economic development is attempted here. Focusing on countries undergoing rapid economic development brings an alternative perspective to an analysis of library development in Africa and helps us to understand not only what is lacking but also what is going well as a basis for future development. The paper is divided into three parts: one that considers the contemporary landscape of librarianship in Africa; one that describes the characteristics of African society; and one that concerns the major role that information and communication technologies (ICTs) have played in the renaissance of libraries in Africa. Several drivers of change in African library development stand out—most notably: 1) the achievement of stronger economic circumstances; 2) the increased prevalence of ICTs and access to the internet; 3) expanded public awareness of the value of libraries in society; and 4) partnership between the new generation of government leaders and partner agencies that are more focused on social impact than maintaining influence and dominance.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses the ethical aspects of doctoral-research advising in the emerging African information society from an African perspective. It addresses the following research questions: What is the status of information ethics in Africa? What theoretical frameworks are available to illuminate the ethical dimension of the emerging African information society? To what extent are ethical aspects of the emerging African information society integrated into doctoral-research advising in library and information science in Africa? What are the roles and obligations of the supervisor and supervisee in doctoral research? How is information and communication technology (ICT) being used to enhance doctoral-research advising? The paper is underpinned by various ethical theoretical models, such as the Trust Model, Hayward Power Relations, classical and contemporary ethical traditions, and game theory. It relies upon a literature survey to address the research problems. Results reveal, among other things, the milestones achieved by African scholars in promoting information ethics through curriculum development and research. However, there is a need for the evolving information society to take cognizance of African cultural contexts. The results also reveal that supervisor supervisee relationships are constrained. The ethical dimension of the emerging African information society should be infused into the doctoral-research process to improve the relationships of supervisor and supervisee. This should be supported by responsible use of ICT, taking into account the Africa cultural context and African values to facilitate the doctoral-advising process. All these should be buttressed by an enabling policy framework at the institutional level to promote harmony and productivity in doctoral research.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the last two decades, Croatian libraries have been influenced by four key factors: 1) becoming an independent state with new sociopolitical and economic systems in the 1990s, during which time the state transformed from socialism to a democracy with a market economy; 2) reconstructing after the devastation brought by war; 3) developing information and communication technologies; and 4) experiencing the effects of a global economic crisis, the impact of which is still strongly evident throughout Croatia. The present state of libraries in Croatia indicates that the profession of librarianship and libraries are facing many problems. Yet, there is also a sign of the significant potential resulting from the long tradition of librarianship in Croatian history, and the relatively high level of library development that had occurred centuries prior to the process of transition brought by upheaval in the late twentieth century. During the postsocialist period, libraries in Croatia saw the continued evolution of a historical, legal, and normative library framework invested in librarianship as a service to the public, coupled with an increase in international networking, cooperation, and education. The rapid global advancement of information and communications technologies in the last decade of the twentieth century expedited the construction of the technological infrastructure necessary to building Croatian libraries, enabling their innovation. At the present time, the country’s libraries are characterized by a focus on the information needs of their patrons that is guided by the principle of freedom of access to information.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper provides an overview of the Albanian library network within the changing context of the past twenty-two years. The first part traces the development of the library system in Albania by giving a brief review of library legislation and library science education and professional training. The second part provides background information about the implementation of new technologies that facilitated free access to information throughout the country. The paper highlights the leadership role of the National Library of Albania (NLA), which functions as the professional body that oversees all libraries in the country, and its leading role nationwide. The NLA’s engagement in various digitization projects that ensure access to the Albanian national cultural heritage and treasures makes it an important contributor to international projects as well.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper takes a fresh look at the transformative events that marked the development of the library scene at the twenty-fifth anniversary of regime change in Romania. It examines their significance for the country’s postcommunist trajectories by linking the past, present, and future of library development. Libraries of all types have been affected in either a positive or negative way during the past twenty-five years. Currently, there is no strategy at the national level to coordinate library development or to establish priorities and directions for growth. Due to significant financial aid from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the public library sector has made significant progress, especially in the diversification of computer-based services offered to the communities they serve. Higher education has witnessed the advent of private universities, although oftentimes not endowed with adequate libraries. The public and academic library network has embraced the new information and communications technology. School libraries, although high in numbers, have remained anchored in the past, with a few exceptions. Many special libraries have disappeared, along with their parent institutions. Despite its moving into a modern edifice, the National Library of Romania is yet to identify its role, goals, mission, and vision for the information society. Two major library associations have elevated librarianship to a professional status, but they act independently of each other and their programs never intersect. Library legislation and other laws provide the legal framework for libraries, the publishing industry, and the information and communications field. Despite the progress reported by libraries, usage continues to remain very low. The public’s perception of libraries’ role in society has not yet crystallized. Insufficient funding prevents Romanian libraries from performing at the same parameters as their counterparts in economically developed countries.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an overview of the development of Kosovan libraries and literature between the years 1990 to 1999, one of the most difficult decades in the county’s history. During this time, both Kosovo’s libraries and its Albanian people suffered under the effects of extreme political unrest. In addition to analyzing this period of social turmoil, the paper provides a brief history of Kosovan libraries, the oppression of the Albanians during the 1998–1999 war in Kosovo, and an overview of the country’s contemporary libraries and their vision for the future.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper provides a brief introduction to the Republic of Slovenia and presents a history of its library system. Although the first “public” library opened in 1569 and the first “public” research library in 1701, the current library system originated in the twentieth century, after World War I. The library system of Slovenia today is an organized network consisting of publicly funded libraries of all types, which have been in continuous development since the end of World War II. Several academic and research libraries started using informationretrieval systems in the early 1970s, while other Slovenian libraries started using automated services during the late 1980s. Slovenian libraries have recently reached a relatively high level of development and are now focused on providing digital resources and other new services to their users. While digital libraries are active these days and several acquisition consortia are currently providing user access to numerous resources after a long period of stable and significant growth, the recent global financial crisis provoked austerity measures that are threatening the continued development of the country’s library system.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Library Trends
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Slovakia is a young and progressive country that has undergone great changes since its establishment as a sovereign state. This paper describes the transformation of the Slovak library system after 1989 in the context of the political, societal, and legislative developments in the new democratic state. It highlights the historical milestones of the development of Slovak librarianship between 1989 and 2014, outlines the historical context of Slovak library legislation, explains the preparation and implementation of the new Library Act passed by the National Council of the Slovak Republic in May 2000, and provides an overview of statistical data for Slovak libraries during the last decade.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Library Trends