Seminars in Vascular Surgery (SEMIN VASC SURG)

Publisher: WB Saunders

Journal description

Each issue of Seminars in Vascular Surgery examines the latest thinking on a particular clinical problem and features new diagnostic and operative techniques. The journal allows practitioners to expand their capabilities and to keep pace with the most rapidly evolving areas of surgery.

Current impact factor: 1.38

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.379
2013 Impact Factor 1.583
2012 Impact Factor 1.015
2011 Impact Factor 1.707
2010 Impact Factor 1.5
2009 Impact Factor 1.721
2008 Impact Factor 1.338

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.72
Cited half-life 6.00
Immediacy index 0.05
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.62
Website Seminars in Vascular Surgery website
Other titles Seminars in vascular surgery (Online), Seminars in vascular surgery
ISSN 1558-4518
OCLC 60626665
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

WB Saunders

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject-based repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/07/2015
    • 'WB Saunders' is an imprint of 'Elsevier'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Wound healing is a systemic response to injury that impacts the entire body and not just the site of tissue damage, and represents one of the most complex biological processes. Our knowledge of wound healing continues to evolve and it is now clear that the wound microenvironment plays a crucial role. The interactions between cells and the surface microenvironment, referred to as the biofilm, contributes to skin homeostasis and healing.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Dermal tissue loss in patients affected by critical limb ischemia represent a serious wound healing problem, with high morbidity, prolonged hospital stay, and high patient care costs. Treatment of ischemic foot lesions required limb revascularization by endovascular or open surgical intervention and individualized patient-specific wound care; including antibiotic therapy, devitalized/infected wound debridement, and advanced wound dressing. In selected patients, spinal cord stimulation, vacuum-assisted closure therapy, and bioengineered tissue or skin substitutes and growth factors have been shown to improve wound healing. In this study we present our preliminary results about the topical application of autologous platelet-rich plasma to enhance the process of wound healing after revascularization of lower limbs, in patients affected by critical limb ischemia.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and lower extremity wounds represent a significant clinical challenge to achieve healing. Important outcome measures that define a successful therapeutic approach include: wound healing rate, time to heal, and recurrence with time. This article reviews our experience in managing a PAD patient cohort at a Veterans Affairs medical center based on the initial clinical evaluation stratification and prospective enrollment into a predetermined treatment strategy.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have reported that health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is adversely affected by diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). There is a paucity of data on effect of foot ulcer on HRQoL of diabetes patients in our population. Since South-Asians, especially, Indians have a unique features related to diabetes and its complication, generalizing the data of its effect on HRQoL from any other part of the world is not a pragmatic approach. This study evaluates impact of foot ulcers on HRQoL of diabetes patients. This cross-sectional study conducted in Kasturba Medical College Hospital, Manipal (Costal South India), consisted of 200 DFU patients in study group (SG) and 200 diabetes patients in control group (CG). RAND-36 questionnaire were employed for evaluating HRQoL scores of the patients in both groups. DFU patients additionally completed DFS-SF questionnaire. Independent t-test was used to test the differences in the mean scores. The results show that both CG and SG have ‘poor’ HRQoL (mean score < 50) in all the subscales, except two subscales in CG. There is statistically significant difference (p<0.05) in all the eight subscales of HRQoL between both groups. For both CG and SG, the summary score of physical health (PCS) domains (44.9±6.3 vs 28.4±3.4) and mental health (MCS) domains (42.5±3.8 vs 29.5±7.1) were poor. There is a significant difference between CG and SG in both mean PCS score and MCS score of HRQoL (p<0.05). DFS-SF scale shows, HRQoL is very poor for DFU patients in all the six domains. The study concludes that DFU patients have very poor HRQoL compared to diabetes. Likewise, the diabetic foot is associated with severely impaired HRQoL in both physical and mental health aspects. This study will help to develop a patient education model for DFU patients by looking into the various HRQoL domains that adversely affected by the presence of foot ulcer.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Venous ulcer of the lower extremity is common vascular condition and associated with decreased quality of life, reduced mobility, and social isolation. Treatment of chronic venous ulcer (CVU) includes compression therapy, debridement of the ulcer when necessary, and wound care. Collagen and antimicrobial dressings may improve the proportion of ulcers healed compared with compression alone. Acellular skin equivalents are not superior to compression, but cellular human skin equivalents may promote more rapid healing, particularly in patients with longstanding ulcers. Current vascular surgical practice is to eliminate documented reflux or obstruction in patients with chronic venous ulceration that have failed a 3-month period of compression dressing, debridement, and local wound care. We found that surgical treatment of the superficial venous system may decrease the time-to-healing of CVUs compared with compression therapy alone, but does not increase the proportion of ulcers healed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of chronic wounds is sharply rising throughout the world due to an aging population and increase in the incidence of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. People with diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia are at increased risk for developing peripheral arterial disease (PAD). PAD affects 8 to 12 million people over the age of 40 years in the United States and it is a major contributing factor in the development of lower extremity ulcers (LEU). While a number of non-invasive diagnostic tests are available to detect PAD in lower extremities, they have several clinical limitations.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The average patient requiring vascular surgery has become older, as life expectancy within the US population has increased. Many older patients have some degree of frailty and reside near the limit of their physiological reserve with restricted ability to respond to stressors such as surgery. Frailty assessment is an important part of the preoperative decision-making process, in order to determine whether patients are fit enough to survive the vascular surgery procedure and live long enough to benefit from the intervention. In this review, we will discuss different measures of frailty assessment and how they can be used by vascular surgery providers to improve preoperative decision making and the quality of patient care.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Quality care of vascular surgery patients extends to the postoperative coordination of care and long-term surveillance, including the medical management of vascular disease. This is particularly highlighted in contemporary modern vascular surgery practice, as tremendous focus is being placed on postoperative adverse events and hospital readmissions. The purpose of this review is to provide a contemporary perspective of transitions of care at discharge and long-term surveillance recommendations after vascular surgery interventions.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: A systemic review of published reports on the incidence of early (<30 days) adverse events occurring after above- or below-knee femoropopliteal bypass surgery was conducted to provide contemporary outcomes data for comparative reporting. A total of 38 articles were included describing 6,374 femoropopliteal bypasses in 6,007 patients. Fifty-two percent were male and the mean age was 64.6 years (range, 40 to 93 years). The various studied types of complications were reported in 10 to 34 of 38 articles and definitions were often missing. The overall 30-day morbidity rate was 36.8%. The wound infection rate was 7.8% (range, 0.0 to 17.4%) accompanied with dermal necrosis in 0.4%. Graft infection was described in 2.4% (range, 0.0 to 5.3%) of cases. Postoperative bleeding was seen in 7.4% (range, 0.0 to 26%), of which 2.5% required return to surgery. Occlusions were reported in 12.0% (range, 0.0 to 59%). Lymphedema occurred in 2.9% (range, 0.0 to 9.6%) of cases and surgical site seroma formation occurred in 2.0% (range, 1.0% to 3.0%). Overall 30-day mortality rate was 2.3% (range 0.0 to 4.3%). Pooled data comparing vein grafts and prosthetic grafts revealed no significant difference (P = .10; risk ratio = 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.03; I(2) = 0%) in the incidence of complications. This review confirmed the morbidity of femoropopliteal bypass surgery is inconsistently reported and definitions are lacking. Because one-third of patients can be expected to experience an adverse event after femoropopliteal bypass grafting, standards on defining and reporting complications are necessary if comparative outcome standards are developed.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Increasingly, there is a wealth of data available to aid patients in determining where to seek care for quality vascular disease. At times, these data may be difficult for the public to comprehend. Hospital rating organizations, frequently motivated by profit, are marketing directly to consumers with increasingly granular data. In this report, we examine the most popular ratings for hospitals that perform vascular surgical procedures and describe the methodology of each rating system, as well as the validity of the data underscoring these ratings. Understanding how hospital quality is being evaluated and what outcomes measures are being collated allows vascular surgeons to take appropriate actions to ensure the validity of their own hospital ratings.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The preoperative workup is a necessary and crucial evaluation for patients undergoing major vascular surgery. It is important to assess for likelihood of perioperative adverse events and then implement evidence-based measures to reduce identified medical comorbidities and improve the quality of patient care and outcomes after surgery. Although there are numerous opportunities to implement evidence-based processes during the preoperative period, there are many barriers that can prevent vascular surgeons from achieving these goals. This review will discuss how an implementation science-based approach can be used by members of the vascular surgery team to identify appropriate preoperative evidence-based interventions for diverse practice settings and to overcome barriers and allow integration of these interventions as part of the routine preoperative workup.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Tobacco abuse is a highly prevalent modifiable risk factor in vascular surgery patient populations. Despite the known benefits of smoking cessation, quitting smoking is difficult for most patients. Physician advice to stop smoking can help, though more intensive or multifactorial interventions have greater impact. Smoking cessation initiatives based in vascular clinics are feasible, although currently there is significant variation in physician delivery of smoking cessation interventions. Vascular surgeons are optimally poised to be able to capitalize on the "teachable moment" of the vascular procedure to encourage smoking cessation. Concise and effective smoking cessation strategies include standardized physician "very brief advice" (a standardized advice delivery developed and validated by the National Health Service), referral to telephone counseling, and prescription of pharmacotherapy, all of which are best utilized together. This review will discuss different smoking cessation strategies, as well as their inclusion in multicenter trials designed to study delivery of smoking cessation interventions in vascular surgery patients.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The intensity and quality of medical care provided to patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) varies by geography, ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Although vascular surgery societal performance goals have been set forth, no consensus criteria exist by which to benchmark the quality of healthcare delivery specifically for CLI patients. We review existing broad performance measures for patients with peripheral vascular disease and suggest those with optimal care delivery suited for CLI (ankle-brachial index, optimal medical therapy, smoking cessation and duplex surveillance). Further, we propose that diabetic management, degree of wound healing and quality of life measures be considered as additional quality measures for CLI management. In combination, these criteria provide a simple yet powerful metric that may allow for standardization of CLI care and comparisons across institutions with the potential for diminishing the disparity that exists in current treatment practices.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The underlying pathophysiology of venous ulceration is venous hypertension, which initiates a complex cascade of cellular humeral events that are then magnified by genetic factors. Hemodynamic abnormalities are features of primary and secondary chronic venous diseases that lead to disease progression. Through a sequence of events, some patients develop venous leg ulcers, if the process is not interrupted. The exact science of the pathophysiology of the progression of chronic venous disease to venous leg ulcers is still in its infancy, but the framework for future study has been established.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The importance of the obstructive component in chronic venous disease (CVD) with ulceration has been emphasized recently for a venous condition that has primarily focused on the reflux component. Modern imaging techniques, particularly intravascular ultrasound, have shown the frequency of the obstructive element in both post-thrombotic and nonthrombotic disease. The emergence of iliac vein stent angioplasty and its good results in the treatment of large vein and other diverse CVD subsets has strengthened the role of obstruction. Lower-limb symptom diminution after iliac vein stenting in patients with concomitant reflux has been surprising, and has prompted a better understanding of CVD pathology. The technique of venous stenting differs from arterial in both technique and purpose. Mere restoration of forward flow is not sufficient; adequate decompression of the peripheral veins with reduction in ambulatory venous hypertension must be achieved. This requires implantation of large-diameter stents approximating normal anatomy. Stent recanalization of chronic total occlusions of the iliac-caval segments-even long occlusions involving the entire inferior vena cava (IVC)-can be successfully carried out, supplanting prior difficult open techniques, and this approach is applicable to patients with thrombosed IVC filters. Iliocaval stent angioplasty is safe, with low mortality and morbidity (<1%), and a cumulative patency ranging from 90% to 100% and 74% to 89% for nonthrombotic and post-thrombotic disease, respectively, at 3 to 5 years. Clinical relief of pain ranged from 86% to 94% and relief for swelling ranged from 66% to 89%; and 58% to 89% of venous ulcers healed. Procedural success in recanalization of chronic total occlusion lesions ranged from 83% to 95%, but long-term patency of stents in recanalized chronic total occlusion lesions is 10% to 20% lower than for stenotic lesions. Initial stent treatment does not preclude later open correction of obstruction or reflux in case of stent failure. These features, combined with the minimally invasive nature of the stent technique, have opened this avenue of treatment to a larger portion of the symptomatic CVD population.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Perioperative medical management of patients undergoing carotid, aortic, or peripheral arterial procedures, both open and endovascular, should be optimized in all cases to achieve excellent outcomes. This particular patient population is often plagued with multiple comorbidities, primarily of the cardiovascular system, but frequently involving other systems. For this reason, management of these comorbidities is complex and should be carefully addressed in every patient throughout the surgical encounter, in many cases through a multidisciplinary approach. Most recently, the perioperative use of statins, antiplatelet agents, and β-blockers have been scrutinized in the literature specifically targeting peripheral vascular disease patients, and results have sometimes been conflicting. The objective of this review is to summarize current available evidence regarding optimal perioperative medical management of patients undergoing arterial vascular surgical procedures, open and endovascular.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) is a collaborative network of vascular specialists from various specialties that seeks to improve the quality and safety of vascular care by sharing data among physicians, medical centers, and regions. Working under a Patient Safety Organization designation by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the VQI provides a protected environment where data can be pooled and evaluated for trends that might provide opportunities to improve the care we provide our patients. Since its inception in 2011, this national organization has grown rapidly and now involves >300 medical centers that are separated into 18 active regional groups who meet twice yearly to discuss quality improvement. The structure of the VQI provides a powerful platform for data collection and analysis, and has allowed the development of a large body of literature that demonstrates the importance and benefits of participation. Here we provide a brief overview of the VQI to date.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Seminars in Vascular Surgery