Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America (Otolaryngol Clin)

Publisher: WB Saunders

Journal description

Each issue of Otolaryngologic Clinics reviews new diagnostic and management techniques for a single clinical problem--and makes them simple to apply. Its concise, comprehensive, and its editors and authors are respected experts.

Current impact factor: 1.49

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.49
2013 Impact Factor 1.341
2012 Impact Factor 1.458
2011 Impact Factor 1.649
2010 Impact Factor 1.886
2009 Impact Factor 1.136
2008 Impact Factor 0.87
2007 Impact Factor 0.701
2006 Impact Factor 0.911
2005 Impact Factor 0.731
2004 Impact Factor 0.677
2003 Impact Factor 0.561
2002 Impact Factor 0.717
2001 Impact Factor 0.569
2000 Impact Factor 0.537
1999 Impact Factor 0.511
1998 Impact Factor 0.78
1997 Impact Factor 0.994

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.76
Cited half-life 9.40
Immediacy index 0.08
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.56
Website Otolaryngologic Clinics website
Other titles Otolaryngologic clinics of North America
ISSN 1557-8259
OCLC 1761575
Material type Series, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

WB Saunders

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject-based repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/07/2015
    • 'WB Saunders' is an imprint of 'Elsevier'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Injury of the internal carotid artery during endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery is a feared and perilous scenario. This article discusses perioperative strategies to prevent or manage an internal carotid artery injury to optimize outcomes. Meticulous preoperative planning is crucial in preventing its occurrence and minimizing its consequences. An effective plan of action relies on a well-prepared protocol, availability of proper instruments and devices, and an experienced multidisciplinary team. Intraoperative control of hemorrhage and stabilization of the patient's cardiovascular status is followed by an angiography and endovascular treatment whenever possible. Close clinical and radiologic monitoring of the patient prevents early and late complications.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of sinonasal origin. These tumors typically present with unilateral nasal obstruction and epistaxis, and diagnosis is confirmed on biopsy. Over the past 15 years, significant advances have been made in endoscopic technology and techniques that have made this tumor amenable to expanded endonasal resection. There is growing evidence supporting the feasibility of safe and effective resection of esthesioneuroblastoma via an expanded endonasal approach. This article outlines a technique for endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma and reviews the current literature on esthesioneuroblastoma with emphasis on outcomes after endoscopic resection of these malignant tumors.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: Meningiomas represent 30% of all primary brain tumors. Anterior skull base meningiomas represent 8.8% of all meningiomas. Surgical resection is a main treatment option for tumors that are symptomatic and/or growing. Recurrence is directly related to the extent of resection of the tumor, the dural attachment, and pathologic bone. Endoscopic endonasal approaches represent an important addition to the treatment armamentarium for skull base meningiomas. This article provides an overview of meningiomas, with a focus on those of the anterior skull base and their management.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: "Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery has dramatically changed and expanded over recent years due to significant advancements in instrumentation, techniques, and anatomic understanding. With these advances, the need for more robust skull base reconstructive techniques was vital. In this article, reconstructive options ranging from acellular grafts to vascular flaps are described, including the strengths, weaknesses, and common uses."
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: To maximize outcomes from endoscopic skull base surgery, careful early postoperative management is critically important. Standardized postoperative regimens are lacking. The type of reconstruction and presence and type of cerebrospinal fluid leak dictate management. If a leak is encountered intraoperatively, patients should avoid maneuvers that increase intracranial pressures for at least 1 month. Early postoperative care focuses on minimizing and managing nasal crusting. This article reviews the evidence in the literature on postoperative management, complications, and quality of life after surgery, and outlines our experience in the management of patients after endoscopic skull base surgery.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: The endoscopic endonasal approach provides a direct surgical trajectory to anteriorly located lesions at the craniovertebral junction. The inferior limit of surgical exposure is predicted by the nasopalatine line, and the lateral limit is demarcated by the lower cranial nerves. Endoscopic endonasal odontoidectomy allows preservation of the soft palate, and patients can restart an oral diet on the first postoperative day. Treating the condition at the craniovertebral junction using this approach requires careful preoperative planning and endoscopic endonasal surgical experience with a 2-surgeon 4-handed approach combining expertise in otolaryngology and neurosurgery.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: Before the vascularized pedicled nasoseptal flap was popularized, lumbar drains (LDs) were routinely used for cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) diversion in endoscopic skull base reconstruction. LDs are not necessary in most CSF leaks encountered during skull base surgery. The use of an LD is considered in select high-risk settings in which a high-flow leak is anticipated and the patient has significant risk factors that make closure of the leak more challenging. Evidence for the use of LDs in preventing postoperative after endoscopic skull base reconstruction is reviewed and a rational framework for their use is proposed.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: The anatomy of the skull base is complex with multiple neurovascular structures in a small space. Understanding all of the intricate relationships begins with understanding the anatomy of the sphenoid bone. The cavernous sinus contains the carotid artery and some of its branches; cranial nerves III, IV, VI, and V1; and transmits venous blood from multiple sources. The anterior skull base extends to the frontal sinus and is important to understand for sinus surgery and sinonasal malignancies. The clivus protects the brainstem and posterior cranial fossa. A thorough appreciation of the anatomy of these various areas allows for endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: The pituitary gland functions prominently in the control of most endocrine systems in the body. Diverse processes such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, and water balance are tightly regulated by the pituitary in conjunction with the hypothalamus and various downstream endocrine organs. Benign tumors of the pituitary gland are the primary cause of pituitary pathology and can result in inappropriate secretion of pituitary hormones or loss of pituitary function. First-line management of clinically significant tumors often involves surgical resection. Understanding of normal pituitary physiology and basic testing strategies to assess for pituitary dysfunction should be familiar to any skull base surgeon.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Building an endoscopic cranial base practice can be challenging and is predicated on the right team. Successful outcomes stem from an efficient and talented team that improves its skills experientially in a supportive environment. As with most new endeavors that are beyond the traditional approach, there is a great deal of up-front effort and investment required. This article explores some of the key building blocks necessary for a successful endoscopic cranial base and pituitary program and highlights some of the lessons learned during the authors' journey at the Cleveland Clinic.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: The nasal cavity has a robust vascular supply, and bleeding is a primary obstacle to the minimally invasive skull base technique. Venous bleeding, including the cavernous sinus, can be managed with various techniques using hemostatic materials and pressure. A thorough understanding of the skull base vascular anatomy is vital for avoiding injury to major arteries and having confidence to control venous bleeding to optimize the endoscopic view and tumor resection.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: The sellar region is a tiny anatomic compartment in which many lesions and developmental diseases can be found. If pituitary adenomas represent most of the sellar mass, it is important to recognize other pathologic conditions before any surgical procedure, because the optimal treatment may differ considerably from one lesion to another. A careful clinical evaluation followed by neuroimaging studies and an endocrinologic and ophtalmologic workup will lead, in most cases, to a diagnosis with near certainty. This article provides an overview of sellar diseases with emphasis on their most useful characteristics for clinical practice.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: Craniopharyngioma is a rare clinical entity that poses a significant management challenge given their location and propensity to recur. As part of a minimally disruptive treatment paradigm, the expanded endonasal approach has the potential to improve rates of resection, improve postoperative visual recovery, and minimize surgical morbidity. This article updates the otolaryngologic community on the basic principles and techniques regarding the incorporation of the endoscopic, endonasal approach in the management paradigm of craniopharyngioma.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base pathology have developed and evolved dramatically over the past 2 decades, particularly with collaboration between neurosurgery and otolaryngology physicians. These advances have increased significantly the use of such approaches beyond just resection of pituitary adenomas, including a variety of skull base pathologies. As the field has evolved, so has our understanding of the complications accompanying endoscopic skull base surgery, as well as techniques to both avoid and manage these complications. These are discussed here.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since the description of a transnasal approach for treatment of pituitary tumors, transsphenoidal surgery has undergone continuous development. Hirsch developed a lateral endonasal approach before simplifying it to a transseptal approach. Cushing approached pituitary tumors using a transsphenoidal approach but transitioned to the transcranial route. Transsphenoidal surgery was not "rediscovered" until Hardy introduced the surgical microscope. An endoscopic transsphenoidal approach for pituitary tumors has been reported and further advanced. We describe the principles of pituitary surgery including the key elements of surgical decision making and discuss the technical nuances distinguishing the endoscopic from the microscopic approach.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
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    ABSTRACT: Hearing loss is the most common congenital sensory impairment. According to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2001 to 2008, 20.3% of subjects aged greater than or equal to 12 had unilateral or bilateral hearing loss. The World Health Organization notes that, worldwide, there are 360 million people with disabling hearing loss, with 50% preventable. Although many hearing losses are acquired, many others are manifestations of preexisting conditions. The purpose of a pediatric hearing evaluation is to identify the degree and type of hearing loss and etiology and to outline a comprehensive strategy that supports language and social development and communication.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America