Cancer biology & therapy (Canc Biol Ther)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Journal description

Cancer, the second leading cause of death, is a heterogenous group of over 100 diseases. Cancer is characterized by disordered and deregulated cellular and stromal proliferation accompanied by reduced cell death with the ability to survive under stresses of nutrient and growth factor deprivation, hypoxia, and loss of cell-to-cell contacts. At the molecular level, cancer is a genetic disease that develops due to the accumulation of mutations over time in somatic cells. The phenotype includes genomic instability and chromosomal aneuploidy that allows for acceleration of genetic change. Malignant transformation and tumor progression of any cell requires immortalization, loss of checkpoint control, deregulation of growth, and survival. A tremendous amount has been learned about the numerous cellular and molecular genetic changes and the host-tumor interactions that accompany tumor development and progression. It is the goal of the field of Molecular Oncology to use this knowledge to understand cancer pathogenesis and drug action, as well as to develop more effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for cancer. This includes preventative strategies as well as approaches to treat metastases. With the availability of the human genome sequence and genomic and proteomic approaches, a wealth of tools and resources are generating even more information. The challenge will be to make biological sense out of the information, to develop appropriate models and hypotheses and to translate information for the clinicians and the benefit of their patients. Cancer Biology & Therapy aims to publish original research on the molecular basis of cancer, including articles with translational relevance to diagnosis or therapy. We will include timely reviews covering the broad scope of the journal. The journal will also publish op-ed pieces and meeting reports of interest. The goal is to foster communication and rapid exchange of information through timely publication of important results using traditional as well as electronic formats. The journal and the outstanding Editorial Board will strive to maintain the highest standards for excellence in all activities to generate a valuable resource.

Current impact factor: 3.07

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 3.072
2013 Impact Factor 3.63
2012 Impact Factor 3.287
2011 Impact Factor 2.636
2010 Impact Factor 2.907
2009 Impact Factor 2.711
2008 Impact Factor 2.761
2007 Impact Factor 2.873
2006 Impact Factor 2.818
2005 Impact Factor 2.981
2004 Impact Factor 3.279
2003 Impact Factor 3.024

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.62
Cited half-life 5.70
Immediacy index 0.70
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 1.00
Website Cancer Biology and Therapy website
Other titles Cancer biology & therapy (Online), Cancer biology & therapy, Cancer biology and therapy
ISSN 1555-8576
OCLC 60037853
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Identification of genetic alterations in Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC) may provide scientists and clinicians with a list of new targets for drug research and development. Recently published in Cell, Robinson et al. present the first look at genetic data from mCRPC lesions gathered over multiple years and from many institutions.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Evofosfamide (TH-302) is a hypoxia-activated prodrug of the cytotoxin bromo-isophosphoramide. In hypoxic conditions Br-IPM is released and alkylates DNA. Ifosfamide is a chloro-isophosphoramide prodrug activated by hepatic Cytochrome P450 enzymes. Both compounds are used for the treatment of cancer. Ifosfamide has been approved by the FDA while evofosfamide is currently in the late stage of clinical development. The purpose of this study is to compare efficacy and safety profile of evofosfamide and ifosfamide in preclinical non-small cell lung cancer H460 xenograft models. Immunocompetent CD-1 mice and H460 tumor-bearing immunocompromised nude mice were used to investigate the safety profile. The efficacy of evofosfamide or ifosfamide, alone, and in combination with docetaxel or sunitinib was compared in ectopic and intrapleural othortopic H460 xenograft models in animals exposed to ambient air or different oxygen concentration breathing conditions. At an equal body weight loss level, evofosfamide showed greater efficacy in both ectopic and orthotopic H460 xenograft models. Evofosfamide, but not ifosfamide, exhibited controlled oxygen concentration breathing condition-dependent antitumor activity. However, at an equal body weight loss level, ifosfamide yielded severe hematologic toxicity when compared to evofosfamide, both in monotherapy and in combination with docetaxel. At an equal hematoxicity level, evofosfamide showed superior antitumor activity. These results indicate that evofosfamide shows superior or comparable efficacy and a favorable safety profile when compared to ifosfamide in preclinical human lung carcinoma models. This finding is consistent with multiple clinical trials of evofosfamide as a single agent, or in combination therapy, which demonstrated both anti-tumor activity and safety profile without severe myelosuppression.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is a drug resistant hypovascular tumor. Although there are many studies on the mechanism of chemoresistance in pancreatic cancers, studies on the relationship between ABCG2 and chemoresistance during hypoxia of pancreatic cancer are rare. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α) is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to oxygen deprivation in cancer cells. The aim of this study was to examine the role of ABCG2 and HIF-1α in mediating chemoresistance during hypoxia in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we detected the expression levels of ABCG2, ERK/phosphorylated-ERK (p-ERK) and HIF-1α by immunohistochemistry in fresh pancreatic cancer and paracarcinoma tissues obtained from 25 patients. The mechanism by which p-ERK1/2 and HIF-1α affect ABCG2's expression was analyzed in the hypoxic cultured human pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-2. ABCG2-mediatedregulation of gemcitabine response under hypoxic conditions in pancreatic cancer cells was observed. It was found that ABCG2, ERK/p-ERK and HIF-1α were overexpressed in cancer tissues. ABCG2, HIF-1α and p-ERK levels were demonstrated to be high during hypoxic conditions in pancreatic cancer cells. Hypoxia induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 to activate HIF-1α and contribute the ABCG2 expression and mediated gemcitabine chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer cells. Hypoxic conditions induced HIF-1α binding to target gene sequences in the ABCG2 promoter, resulting in increased transcription in pancreatic cancer cells. We demonstrated that hypoxia-induced chemoresistance is due to the regulation of ABCG2 through the activation of ERK1/2/HIF-1α. ABCG2 could serve as a predictor of gemcitabine response and, potentially, as a chemotherapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. Inhibition of ERK1/2 and HIF-1αcould result in increased gemcitabine sensitization in pancreatic cancer with highly expressed ABCG2 cell member protein.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Despite advances in sequencing, structural variants (SVs) remain difficult to reliably detect due to the short read length (<300bp) of 2(nd) generation sequencing. Not only do the reads (or paired-end reads) need to straddle a breakpoint, but repetitive elements often lead to ambiguities in the alignment of short reads. We propose to use the long-reads (up to 20kb) possible with 3(rd) generation sequencing, specifically nanopore sequencing on the MinION. Nanopore sequencing relies on a similar concept to a Coulter counter, reading the DNA sequence from the change in electrical current resulting from a DNA strand being forced through a nanometer-sized pore embedded in a membrane. Though nanopore sequencing currently has a relatively high mismatch rate that precludes base substitution and small frameshift mutation detection, its accuracy is sufficient for SV detection because of its long reads. In fact, long reads in some cases may improve SV detection efficiency. We have tested nanopore sequencing to detect a series of well-characterized SVs, including large deletions, inversions, and translocations that inactivate the CDKN2A/p16 and SMAD4/DPC4 tumor suppressor genes in pancreatic cancer. Using PCR amplicon mixes, we have demonstrated that nanopore sequencing can detect large deletions, translocations and inversions at dilutions as low as 1:100, with as few as 500 reads per sample. Given the speed, small footprint, and low capital cost, nanopore sequencing could become the ideal tool for the low-level detection of cancer-associated SVs needed for molecular relapse, early detection, or therapeutic monitoring.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) can effectively control non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, EGFR mutations should be detected before lung cancer patients undergo EGFR-TKI therapy. This study assessed the feasibility and predictive value of EGFR mutations in peripheral blood samples. Methods: EGFR mutations in exons 19 and 21 were analyzed in tumor tissue and plasma DNA samples from 121 NSCLC patients using amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) and the integrated technique of mutant enriched PCR (me-PCR) and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), respectively. Results: EGFR mutations were detected in 36.4% of tumor tissues and 34.7% of the plasma at a concordance rate of 85.1% (103/121). The sensitivity and specificity of plasma EGFR mutations were 77.3% and 89.6%, respectively. The gender and tumor histology of patients served as independent predictors of EGFR mutations in both tumor tissues and plasma, while CEA level was an independent predictor of EGFR mutations in the plasma. Furthermore, EGFR-TKI treatment showed a significantly higher objective response rate (ORR), median progression-free survival (mPFS), and overall survival (mOS) in patients harboring EGFR mutation than those that did not exhibit EGFR mutation (ORR: 69.4% versus 13.0% in tissues, P < 0.001; 64.5 % versus 28.6% in the plasma, P = 0.006. mPFS: 10.4 months versus 4.1 months in tissues, P<0.001; 10.5 months versus 5.2 months in the plasma, P=0.001. mOS: 25.7 months versus 8.3 months in tissues, P=0.005; 25.7 months versus 13.5 months in the plasma, P=0.038). Conclusions: EGFR mutations can be detected in the plasma using the integrated technique of me-PCR and DHPLC, which enables us to predict patient response to EGFR-TKI therapy. High serum CEA levels served as an independent predictor for plasma EGFR mutations.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are highly aggressive and grow in response to sex steroid hormones despite lacking expression of the classical estrogen (E2) and progesterone (P4) receptors. Since P4 receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is expressed in breast cancer tumors and is known to mediate P4-induced cell survival, this study was designed to determine the expression of PGRMC1 in TNBC tumors and the involvement of PGRMC1 in regulating proliferation and survival of TNBC cells in vitro and the growth of TNBC tumors in vivo. For the latter studies, the MDA-MB-231 (MDA) cell line derived from TNBC was used. These cells express PGRMC1 but lack expression of the classical P4 receptor. A lentiviral-based shRNA approach was used to generate a stably transfected PGRMC1-deplete MDA line for comparison to the PGRMC1-intact MDA line. The present studies demonstrate that PGRMC1: 1) is expressed in TNBC cells; 2) mediates the ability of P4 to suppress TNBC cell mitosis in vitro; 3) is required for P4 to reduce the apoptotic effects of doxorubicin in vitro; and 4) facilitates TNBC tumor formation and growth in vivo. Taken together, these findings indicate that PGRMC1 plays an important role in regulating the growth and survival of TNBC cells in vitro and ultimately in the formation and development of these tumors in vivo. Thus, PGRMC1 may be a therapeutic target for TNBCs.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Compound EGFR mutations, defined as double or multiple mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain, are frequently detected with advances in sequencing technology but its clinical significance is unclear. This study analyzed 61 cases of EGFR mutation positive lung adenocarcinoma using next-generation sequencing (NGS) based repeated deep sequencing panel of 16 genes that contain actionable mutations and investigated clinical implication of compound EGFR mutations. Compound EGFR mutation was detected in 15 (24.6%) of 61 cases of EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. The majority (12/15) of compound mutations are combination of the atypical mutation and typical mutations such as exon19 deletion, L858R or G719X substitutions, or exon 20 insertion whereas three were combinations of rare atypical mutations. The patients with compound mutation showed shorter overall survival than those with simple mutations (83.7 vs. 72.8 mo; P=0.020, Breslow test). Among the 115 missense mutations discovered in the tested genes, a few number of actionable mutations were detected irrelevant to the subtype of EGFR mutations, including ALK rearrangement, BCL2L11 intron 2 deletion, KRAS c.35G>A, PIK3CA c.1633G>A which are possible target of crizotinib, BH3 mimetics, MEK inhibitors, and PI3K-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, respectively. 31 missense mutations were detected in the cases with simple mutations whereas 84 in those with compound mutation, showing that the cases with compound missense mutation have higher burden of missense mutations (P=0.001, independent sample t-test). Compound EGFR mutations are detected at a high frequency using NGS-based repeated deep sequencing. Because patients with compound EGFR mutations showed poor clinical outcomes, they should be closely monitored during follow-up.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Hemangioma of the heart, presenting as a primary cardiac tumor is extremely rare. Methods: We present a 20-year-old male with a cardiac tumour which was incidentally discovered during routine clinical examination. Results: Echocardiography showed a large intramyocardial mass attached to the left ventricle, close to the apex. A tumor was shown near the apex of the left ventricle by Cardiac CT. We performed a total resection surgery of the tumor one week after admission and the patient recovered well and discharged from hospital 7 days after surgery. Conclusion: The pathological diagnosis was primary cardiac capillary hemangioma. No tumor recurrence was shown by echocardiography after 20 months follow-up visits.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Transketolase-like protein 1 (TKTL1) is an isoform of tranketolase, a key protein in a cancer cell's glucose metabolism that causes rapid cell growth and controls the non-oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Its overexpression occurs in several human cancer types. Our purpose was to study whether TKTL1 expression in colorectal cancer tissue associates with these patients' prognosis. Methods: We collected retrospectively patient data and tissue samples from 840 colorectal cancer patients treated at Helsinki University Hospital, then stained tumor tissue microarrays for TKTL1 by immunohistochemistry, and compared immunohistochemical tissue expression with clinico-pathological parameters and survival. Results: High expression of TKTL1 associated with high Dukes stage, non-mucinous adenocarcinoma, and left-sided disease. Patients with high TKTL1 expression had poorer prognosis than those with low expression, with a 5-year disease-specific survival of 55.7% vs. 62.7%. Conclusion: We show that high TKTL1 in tumor tissue can lead to poor survival in colorectal cancer. TKTL1 thus can serve as a candidate marker for identifying patients at risk of recurrent disease. (Abstract = 168 words).
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Germline CDKN2A mutations have been described in 25% to 40% of melanoma families from several countries. Sicilian population is genetically different from the people of Europe and Northern Italy because of its historical background, therefore familial melanoma could be due to genes different from high-penetrance CDKN2A gene. Four hundred patients with cutaneous melanoma were observed in a 6-years period at the Plastic Surgery Unit of the University of Palermo. Forty-eight patients have met the criteria of the Italian Society of Human Genetics (SIGU) for the diagnosis of familial melanoma and were screened for CDKN2A and CDK4 mutations. Mutation testing revealed that none of the families carried mutations in CDK4 and only one patient harboured the rare CDKN2A p.R87W mutation. Unlike other studies, we have not found high mutation rate of CDKN2A in patients affected by familial melanoma or multiple melanoma. This difference could be attributed to different factors, including the genetic heterogeneity of the Sicilian population. It is likely that, as in the Australian people, the inheritance of familial melanoma in this island of the Mediterranean Sea is due to intermediate/low-penetrance susceptibility genes, which, together with environmental factors (as latitude and sun exposure), could determine the occurrence of melanoma.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric protein phosphatase consisting of a 36-kD catalytic C subunit (PP2Ac). This study aimed to explore the prognostic and biological significance of PP2Ac in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). High PP2Ac expression was significantly (P < 0.01) associated with serum hepatitis B surface antigen positivity, serum hepatitis B e antigen positivity, liver cirrhosis, moderate to poor differentiation grade, advanced disease stage, intrahepatic metastasis, and early recurrence in HCC. Multivariate analysis revealed PP2Ac as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Enforced expression of hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) and its carboxyl-terminal truncated isoform induced PP2Ac expression in HCC cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed a direct interaction between PP2Ac and HBx. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PP2Ac significantly inhibited in vitro cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion and reduced tumor growth in an xenograft mouse model. In contrast, overexpression of PP2Ac promoted HCC cell proliferation, colony formation, and tumorigenesis. Additionally, silencing of PP2Ac impaired the growth-promoting effects on HepG2 HCC cells elicited by overexpression of carboxyl-terminal truncated HBx. Gene expression profiling analysis showed that PP2Ac downregulation modulated the expression of numerous genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis regulation. Collectively, PP2Ac upregulation has a poor prognostic impact on the overall survival of HCC patients and contributes to the aggressiveness of HCC. PP2Ac may represent a potential therapeutic target for HCC.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Aberrant mutational activation of FGFR2 is associated with endometrial cancers (ECs). AP24534 (ponatinib) currently undergoing clinical trials has been known to be an orally available multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our biochemical kinase assay showed that AP24534 is potent against wild-type FGFR1-4 and five mutant FGFRs (V561M-FGFR1, N549H-FGFR2, K650E-FGFR3, G697C-FGFR3, N535K-FGFR4) and possesses the strongest kinase-inhibitory activity on N549H-FGFR2 (IC50 of 0.5 nM) among all FGFRs tested. We therefore investigated the effects of AP24534 on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. AP24534 significantly inhibited the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells bearing activating FGFR2 mutations (N549K, K310R/N549K, S252W) and mainly induced G1/S cell cycle arrest leading to apoptosis. AP24534 also diminished the kinase activity of immunoprecipitated FGFR2 derived from MFE-296 and MFE-280 cells and reduced the phosphorylation of FGFR2 and FRS2 on MFE-296 and AN3CA cells. AP24534 caused substantial reductions in ERK phosphorylation, PLCγ signaling and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs bearing FGFR2 activating mutations. Akt signaling pathway was also deactivated by AP24534. AP24534 causes the chemotherapeutic effect through mainly the blockade of ERK, PLCγ and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs. Moreover, AP24534 inhibited migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells with FGFR2 mutations. In addition, AP24534 significantly blocks anchorage-independent growth of endometrial cancer cells. We, for the first time, report the molecular mechanisms by which AP24534 exerts antitumor effects on ECs with FGFR2 activating mutations, which would provide mechanistic insight into ongoing clinical investigations of AP24534 for ECs.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Fat4 functions as a Hippo signaling regulator which is involved in mammalian tissue development, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Loss of Fat4 due to frequent gene mutation was detected in a variety of tumors including gastric cancer, where Fat4 was recognized as a tumor suppressor, repressing cancer cell proliferation and adhesion. However, the detailed mechanisms linking Fat4 to its diverse functions and clinicopathological characteristics in gastric cancer remain unclear. Here, we silenced Fat4 using Fat4-shRNA in gastric cancer cells and found that this suppression led to the increase in phosphorylated Yap and nuclear accumulation of Yap, which associated to the promoted proliferation, migration and cell cycle progression. Then we transfected a full-length Fat4 into the Fat4-silenced cells, and found the decrease in phosphorylated Yap and inhibition of the cell cycle progression. Intriguingly, Fat4 reduction also leads to the accumulation of cytoplasmic β-catenin via the loss of restraining to cytoplasmic Yap instead of β-catenin transcription promotion. The Fat4-silenced cells which were treated with 5-FU, Cisplatin, Oxaliplatin and Paclitaxel individually demonstrated less sensitivities to these chemotherapy drugs compared with the control cells. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that Fat4 expression was significantly reduced in gastric cancer tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues, and negatively correlated with tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis and cumulative survival rate. In conclusion, Fat4 expression is deceased in gastric cancer cells, leading to nuclear translocation of Yap and correlates with poor prognosis.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Thymic epithelial cells give rise to both thymoma and thymic carcinoma. A crucial advance in thymic epithelial tumors (TET) management may derive from the identification of novel molecular biomarkers able to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning. In a previous study, we identified microRNAs that were differentially expressed in tumor vs normal thymic tissues. Among the microRNAs resulted up-regulated in TET tissues, we evaluated miR-21-5p, miR-148a-3p, miR-141-3p, miR-34b-5p, miR-34c-5p, miR-455-5p as blood plasma circulating non-invasive biomarkers for TET management. We firstly report that the expression levels of specific onco-miRNAs, that we found up-regulated in the blood plasma collected from TET patients at surgery, resulted significantly reduced in follow-up samples. This pilot study suggests that circulating miR-21-5p and miR-148a-3p could represent novel non-invasive biomarkers to evaluate the efficacy of therapy and the prognosis of TET.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Tangeretin, a major phytochemicals in tangerine peels - an important Chinese herb, has been found to have anti-carcinogenic properties. To improve bioavailability and increase potency of tangeretin, its derivative, 5-acetyloxy-6,7,8,4'-tetramethoxyflavone (5-AcTMF), has been synthesized and shown potent inhibition of proliferation activity against human breast and leukemia cancer cell lines. In this study, we have further investigated the anticancer effects of 5-AcTMF on CL1-5 non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLC) both in vitro and in vivo and demonstrated that 5-AcTMF effectively inhibited cancer cell proliferation, induced G2/M-phase arrest associated with cdc2 and CDC25c and increased in the apoptotic cells associated with caspase activation, down regulation of Bcl-2, XIAP and Survivn, inducing release of cytochrome c into the cytosol and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. We also found that 5-AcTMF treatment of CL1-5 activated autophagy, indicated by triggered autophagosome formation and increased LC3-II levels and formation of LC3 puncta. Moreover, we also found that 5-AcTMF lowered phophoatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Over-expression of AKT by AKT cDNA transfection decreased 5-AcTMF mediated apoptosis and autophagy, supporting the induction of apoptosis and autophagy by inhibition of AKT pathway. In an animal study, 5-AcTMF effectively delayed tumor growth in a nude mouse model of CL1-5 xenografts without observed adverse effect. Immunohistochemistry Analysis indicated that 5-AcTMF induced CL1-5 cell apoptosis and autophagy in vivo. Taken together, these data demonstrate that 5-AcTMF is a novel small molecule agent that can inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation, and induce G(2)/M phase arrest and via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and autophagy.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Cancer biology & therapy
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    ABSTRACT: We present two patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had progressed despite treatment with first-line FOLFOX and second-line FOLFIRI combination chemotherapy regimens. After failing these fluoropyrimidine-based regimens, both patients received additional cytotoxic and targeted therapies with eventual disease progression. These therapies included capecitabine plus dabrafenib and trametinib, regorafenib monotherapy, and regorafenib with panitumumab. After exhausting available options, both patients were offered regorafenib with either 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or capecitabine. These therapies are individually approved for the treatment of colorectal cancer but have not yet been studied in combination. This regimen produced stable disease in both patients with acceptable toxicity. One patient continued therapy for 17 months. Although these patients previously progressed during treatment with regorafenib, capecitabine or 5-FU, the combination had some activity in both cases of refractory metastatic colorectal cancer and may be considered in the palliative setting. In bedside-to-bench cell culture experiments performed after the clinical observations, we observed sensitivity of human colorectal cancer cell lines (N=4) to single agent regorafenib or 5-FU and evidence of synergy with the combination therapy. Synergistic effects were noted in colorectal cancer cells with KRAS mutation, BRAF mutation, and p53 mutation, as well as mismatch repair deficient cells. Regorafenib suppressed Mcl-1 and Bcl-XL in treated cancer cells that may have contributed to the anticancer efficacy including in combination with 5-FU. The safety and efficacy of regorafenib with 5-FU or capecitabine in combination should be further investigated as a therapy for patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, including individuals who had progressed on regorafenib monotherapy.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Cancer biology & therapy