Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association

Publisher: Alzheimer's Association, Elsevier

Current impact factor: 12.41

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 12.407
2013 Impact Factor 17.472
2012 Impact Factor 14.483
2011 Impact Factor 6.373
2010 Impact Factor 5.902
2009 Impact Factor 4.553

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 13.32
Cited half-life 3.40
Immediacy index 3.02
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 4.30
Other titles Alzheimer's & dementia (Online), Alzheimer's & dementia, Alzheimer's and dementia
ISSN 1552-5279
OCLC 56502498
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors pre-print on any website, including arXiv and RePEC
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Author's post-print may be used to update arXiv and RepEC
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Author's post-print must be released with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/06/2015
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Diabetes' relationship to specific neuropathologic causes of dementia is incompletely understood. Methods: We used logistic regression to evaluate the association between diabetes and infarcts, Braak stage, neuritic plaque score, and level of Alzheimer's neuropathologic changes in 2365 autopsied persons. In a subset of >1300 persons with available cognitive data, we examined the association between diabetes and cognition using Poisson regression. Results: Diabetes increased odds of brain infarcts (odds ratio [OR] = 1.57, P < .0001), specifically lacunes (OR = 1.71, P < .0001), but not Alzheimer neuropathology. Diabetes plus infarcts was associated with lower cognitive scores at end of life than infarcts or diabetes alone, and diabetes plus high level of Alzheimer's neuropathologic changes was associated with lower mini-mental state examination scores than the pathology alone. Discussion: This study supports the conclusions that diabetes increases the risk of cerebrovascular but not Alzheimer's pathology, and at least some of diabetes' relationship to cognitive impairment may be modified by neuropathology.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Molecular biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can support detection and improved care for patients, but novel candidates require verification. We previously reported a 12-micro RNA (miRNA) blood-based signature using next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 54 AD cases and 22 controls. Methods: We performed validation of 49 AD cases and 55 controls using NGS and also included 20 mild cognitive impairment and 90 multiple sclerosis samples to identify nonspecific markers. Thus, 103 AD cases, 77 unaffected controls, and 110 diseased controls were sequenced. Although the initial cohort came predominantly from the United States, the validation samples were collected in Germany. Results: Five hundred eighty miRNAs were detected in the blood. In the initial cohort, we observed 203, in the validation cohort, 146 dysregulated miRNAs at a significance level of 0.05. With 68 miRNAs, the overlap was significant (P = .0003). Likewise, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve values of the miRNAs correlated (correlation of 0.93; 95% confidence interval 0.89-0.96; P <10(-16)). Discussion: MiRNAs have the potential to support AD diagnosis and patient care.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Low content of cell-free mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a biomarker of early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD), but whether mtDNA is altered in a rapid neurodegenerative dementia such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is unknown. Methods: CSF mtDNA was measured using digital PCR in two independent cohorts comprising a total of 112 patients diagnosed with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), probable AD, or non-Alzheimer's type dementia. Results: Patients with AD exhibit low mtDNA content in CSF compared with patients diagnosed with sCJD or with non-Alzheimer's type dementias. The CSF concentration of mtDNA does not correlate with Aβ, t-tau, p-tau, and 14-3-3 protein levels in CSF. Discussion: Low-CSF mtDNA is not a consequence of brain damage and allows the differential diagnosis of AD from sCJD and other dementias. These results support the hypothesis that mtDNA in CSF is a pathophysiological biomarker of AD.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: The present study investigated the relationship between beta-amyloid (Aβ) and cognition in a late middle-aged cohort at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: One eighty-four participants (mean age = 60; 72% parental history of AD) completed a [C-11]Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography scan and serial cognitive evaluations. A global measure of Aβ burden was calculated, and composite scores assessing learning, delayed memory, and executive functioning were computed. Results: Higher Aβ was associated with classification of psychometric mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at follow-up (P < .01). Linear mixed effects regression results indicated higher Aβ was associated with greater rates of decline in delayed memory (P < .01) and executive functioning (P < .05). Apolipoprotein E ε4 status moderated the relationship between Aβ and cognitive trajectories (P values <.01). Discussion: In individuals at risk for AD, greater Aβ in late middle age is associated with increased likelihood of MCI at follow-up and steeper rates of cognitive decline.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: We examined the association between endogenous sex hormones and both objective and subjective measures of cognitive function. Methods: We followed 3044 women up to 23 years in a prospective cohort study. We measured plasma levels of estrone, estrone sulfate, estradiol, androstenedione, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) in 1989-1990, conducted neuropsychologic testing in 1999-2008, and inquired about subjective cognition in 2012. Results: Overall, we observed little relation between plasma levels of hormones and either neuropsychologic test performance or subjective cognition. However, after adjustment for age and education, we observed a borderline significant association of higher levels of plasma estrone with higher scores for both overall cognition (P trend = .10) and verbal memory (P trend = .08). Discussion: There were no clear associations of endogenous hormone levels at midlife and cognition in later life, although a suggested finding of higher levels of plasma estrone associated with better cognitive function merits further research.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β protein and intracellular accumulation of tau in brain tissues have been described in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mechanical stress-based diseases of different mechanisms, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI), arterial hypertension (HTN), and normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Methods: We provide a brief overview of experimental models of TBI, HTN, and NPH showing features of tau-amyloid pathology, neuroinflammation, and neuronal loss. Results: "Alzheimer-like" hallmarks found in these mechanical stress-based models were compared with AD features found in transgenic models. Discussion: The goal of this review is, therefore, to build on current concepts of onset and progression of AD lesions. We point to the importance of accumulated mechanical stress in brain as an environmental and endogenous factor that pushes protein deposition and neuronal injury over the disease threshold. We further encourage the development of preventing strategies and drug screening based on mechanical stress models.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Three (18)F-labeled radiopharmaceuticals have been Food and Drug Administration-approved for the identification of cortical amyloidosis in clinical settings. Although there has been strong debate among professionals as to the ethical and social consequences of disclosing such information, increasing numbers of participants are being recruited into secondary prevention trials for which they are likely to, and/or desire to, receive their positron emission tomography (PET) imaging results. Methods: Healthy older adults (n = 63, mean age = 62 years) enrolled in a preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers trial, and 11 requested disclosure of PET amyloid imaging results to their treating neurologist, per institutional review board-approved study protocol. These individuals completed a follow-up psychoeducational program and structured interviews to assess impact of disclosure on several key psychological factors. Results: Four of 11 subjects demonstrated increased amyloid aggregation and reported that they were not surprised, particularly given their family histories and subjective memory concerns. All indicated that they had shared this information with pertinent significant others; they were satisfied with their level of social support, and the imaging results had motivated them to change their lifestyle by exercising more, changing their diet, and planning ahead. Amyloid-positive participants showed little change in levels of depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms, subjective sense of memory impairment, or on measures of intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal, and reported risk of self-harm. Discussion: Disclosure of PET amyloid status did not significantly impact mood, subjective sense of memory impairment, or perceived risk of developing AD; nor was this associated with significant emotional impact, irrespective of actual amyloid burden status. Those subjects with increased amyloid burden were more likely than those without significant amyloidosis to make positive changes to their lifestyle (e.g., engaging in more exercise and changing their diet).
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: In preclinical studies, surgery/anesthesia contribute to cognitive decline and enhance neuropathologic changes underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nevertheless, the link between surgery, anesthesia, apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE4), and AD remains unclear. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of two prospective longitudinal aging studies. Mixed-effects statistical models were used to assess the relationship between surgical/anesthetic exposure, the APOE genotype, and rate of change in measures of cognition, function, and brain volumes. Results: The surgical group (n = 182) experienced a more rapid rate of deterioration compared with the nonsurgical group (n = 345) in several cognitive, functional, and brain magnetic resonance imaging measures. Furthermore, there was a significant synergistic effect of anesthesia/surgery exposure and presence of the APOE4 allele in the decline of multiple cognitive and functional measures. Discussion: These data provide insight into the role of surgical exposure as a risk factor for cognitive and functional decline in older adults.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: The importance of home research study visit capacity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies is unknown. Methods: All evaluations are from the prospective adult changes in thought study. Based on analyses of factors associated with volunteering for a new in-clinic initiative, we analyzed AD risk factors and the relevance of neuropathologic findings for dementia comparing all data including home visits, and in-clinic data only. We performed bootstrapping to determine whether differences were greater than expected by chance. Results: Of the 1781 people enrolled during 1994-1996 with ≥1 follow-up, 1369 (77%) had in-clinic data, covering 61% of follow-up time. In-clinic data resulted in excluding 76% of incident dementia and AD cases. AD risk factors and the relevance of neuropathologic findings for dementia were both different with in-clinic data. Discussion: Limiting data collection in AD studies to research clinics alone likely reduces power and also can lead to erroneous inferences.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: This study examined whether interarm differences in systolic blood pressure (IDSBP) ≥10 mm Hg were associated with the risk of incident dementia and subclinical brain injury. Methods: Between 1992 and 1998, 2063 participants of the Framingham Heart Study underwent assessment of IDSBP with results related to the 10-year risk of incident dementia including clinically characterized Alzheimer's disease. Secondary outcomes included markers of subclinical brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging. Results: High IDSBP were associated with a greater risk of incident dementia (hazard ratio [HR] 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-3.40) and Alzheimer's disease (HR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.29-4.18), but only in those who carried an APOE ε4 allele. IDSBP also predicted lower total brain volumes and more prevalent silent brain infarcts in those who were APOE ε4 positive. Discussion: High IDSBP were associated with an increased risk of dementia, including clinical Alzheimer's disease, and subclinical brain injury in those who were APOE ε4 positive.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association