Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials (J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater)

Publisher: Society for Biomaterials; Nihon Baiomateriaru Gakkai; Australian Society for Biomaterials; Korean Society for Biomaterials, Wiley

Journal description

Applied Biomaterials is published as Part B of the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, an official journal of the Society For Biomaterials, the Japanese Society for Biomaterials, the Australasian Society for Biomaterials, and the Korean Society for Biomaterials. It is a peer-reviewed journal serving the needs of biomaterials professionals who devise, promote, apply, regulate, produce, and market new biomaterials and medical devices. It is international and interdisciplinary in scope. Papers are published on device development, implant retrieval and analysis, manufacturing, regulation of devices, liability and legal issues, standards, reviews of different device areas, and clinical applications.

Current impact factor: 2.76

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.759
2013 Impact Factor 2.328
2012 Impact Factor 2.308
2011 Impact Factor 2.147
2010 Impact Factor 2.22
2009 Impact Factor 2.185
2008 Impact Factor 2.03
2007 Impact Factor 1.933
2006 Impact Factor 1.778
2005 Impact Factor 1.621
2004 Impact Factor 1.105

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.90
Cited half-life 5.80
Immediacy index 0.60
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.67
Website Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials website
Other titles Journal of biomedical materials research., Journal of biomedical materials research. Part B, Applied biomaterials, Applied biomaterials
ISSN 1552-4981
OCLC 51823311
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • Non-Commercial
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 07/08/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has been widely used in bone tissue repairing due to its physical mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Addition of trace element to CPC has shown promising evidence to improve the physical properties and biological activities of CPC. Lithium (Li) has effect on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we incorporated Li to CPC and examined the physical properties of Li/CPC and its effect on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. We found that Li doped CPC maintained similar setting time, pore size distribution, compressive strength, composition, and morphology as CPC without Li. Additionally, Li doped CPC improved osteoblast proliferation and differentiation significantly compared to CPC without Li. To our knowledge, our results, for the first time, show that Li doped CPC has beneficial effect on osteoblast in cell culture while keeps the excellent physical-mechanical properties of CPC. This study will lead to potential application of Li doped CPC in bone tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the effects of distinct hydrofluoric acid concentrations on the mechanical behavior of a lithium disilicate-based glass ceramic. Bar-shaped specimens were produced from ceramic blocks (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent). The specimens were polished, chamfered, and sonically cleaned in distilled water. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups (n = 23). The HF1, HF3, HF5, and HF10 specimens were etched for 20 s with acid concentrations of 1%, 3%, 5%, and 10%, respectively, while the SC (control) sample was untreated. The etched surfaces were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope and an atomic force microscope. Finally, the roughness was measured, and 3-point bending flexural tests were performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The Weibull modulus and characteristic strength were also determined. No statistical difference in the roughness and flexural strength was determined among the groups. The structural reliabilities (Weilbull moduli) were similar for the tested groups; however, the characteristic strength of the HF1 specimen was greater than that of the HF10 specimen. Compared with the untreated ceramic, the surface roughness and flexural strength of the ceramic were unaffected upon etching, regardless of the acid concentration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
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    ABSTRACT: The repair of nerves remains a major challenge in neuron-regeneration. In this study, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PLGA/MWCNTs) nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning method. The surface morphology, physical, and mechanical properties were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy, and tensile tests, respectively. SEM analysis, Live/Dead staining, immunostaining assays were performed to evaluate neural cells growth. Blending PLGA with MWCNTs resulted in increase diameter and porosity of the scaffolds, and exhibited better mechanical properties. The results demonstrated that the scaffolds with higher MWCNTs concentration provided better survival for neural cells after 8 days of culture, especially for astrocytes growth. This could be useful in treating the disease like multiple sclerosis that causing central nervous system demyelination and axonal injury. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
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    ABSTRACT: Surface energy plays a major role in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell interactions with biomedical devices. In the present study, poly(ε-caprolactone)-xFe3 O4 nanoparticles (PCL-xFO NPs; x = 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 wt% FO concentration in PCL) composite thin films were developed for skin tissue regeneration. The surface properties in terms of roughness, surface energy, wettability of the thin films were altered with the incorporation of Fe3 O4 NPs. These thin films show antimicrobial properties and cyto-compatibility with NIH 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The porosity and thickness of the films were controlled by varying RPM of the spin coater. Interestingly, at 1000 RPM the roughness of the film decreased with increasing concentrations of FO NPs in PCL, whereas the surface energy increased with increasing FO NPs concentrations. Furthermore, the spreading of NIH-3T3 cells grown on PCL-xFO thin films was less as compared to control (TCPS), however cells overcame this effect after 48 h of seeding and cells spread similarly to those grown on TCPS after 48 h. Also, the incorporation of FO NPs in thin films induced inner membrane permeabilization in E. coli bacteria leading to bacterial cell death. The viability of E. coli bacteria decreased with increasing concentration of FO NPs in PCL. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
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    ABSTRACT: Intimal hyperplasia (IH) is the cause of clinical failure in patients with vascular transplants and intravascular stents. The proliferation and phenotype switching of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play important roles in IH. Inhibiting the proliferation of VSMCs and maintaining the differentiated phenotype of VSMCs is one way to reduce IH. In this article, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) was used in experiments after drug screening. We found that the metabolism, autophagy, and differentiation of VSMCs were enhanced which were important to the normal function of VSMCs, but the secretion of VSMCs was reduced after AICAR treatment. AICAR induces G1 phase arrest and inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs using the MTT and EdU assays and cell cycle analysis. Then, the rat carotid artery vessel transplantation model was used to evaluate the function of AICAR in vivo. AICAR-modified tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) had a higher patency rate and less IH than the control TEBVs. In conclusion, AICAR can improve the normal function of VSMCs by increasing the metabolism and autophagy of VSMCs but inhibit the proliferation, paracrine, and phenotypes switching of VSMCs, further contribute the reducing of IH in TEBVs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
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    ABSTRACT: Trauma to the dental pulp, physical or microbiologic, can lead to inflammation of the pulp followed by necrosis. The current treatment modality for such cases is non-surgical root canal treatment. The damaged tissue is extirpated and the root canal system prepared. It is then obturated with an inert material such a gutta percha. In spite of advances in techniques and materials, 10%-15% of the cases may end in failure of treatment. Regenerative endodontics combines principles of endodontics, cell biology, and tissue engineering to provide an ideal treatment for inflamed and necrotic pulp. It utilizes mesenchymal stem cells, growth factors, and organ tissue culture to provide treatment. Potential treatment modalities include induction of blood clot for pulp revascularization, scaffold aided regeneration, and pulp implantation. Although in its infancy, successful treatment of damaged pulp tissue has been performed using principles of regenerative endodontics. This field is dynamic and exciting with the ability to shape the future of endodontics. This article highlights the fundamental concepts, protocol for treatment, and possible avenues for research in regenerative endodontics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
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    ABSTRACT: Repair of degenerated intervertebral discs (IVD) might be established via intradiscal delivery of biologic therapies. Polyester amide polymers (PEA) were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility, and thereafter intradiscal application of PEA microspheres (PEAMs) in a canine model predisposed to IVD degeneration at long-term (6 months) follow-up. PEA extracts did not induce cytotoxicity in mouse fibroblast cells (microscopy and XTT assay), while a slight foreign body reaction was demonstrated by histopathology after intramuscular implantation in rabbits. Intradiscal injection of a volume of 40 µL through 26 and 27G needles induced no degenerative changes in acanine model susceptible to IVD disease. Although sham-injected IVDs showed increased CAV1 expression compared with noninjected IVDs, which may indicate increased cell senescence, these findings were not supported by immunohistochemistry, biomolecular analysis of genes related to apoptosis, biochemical and histopathological results. PEAM-injected IVDs showed significantly higher BAX/BCL2 ratio vs sham-injected IVDs suggestive of an anti-apoptotic effect of the PEAMs. These findings were not supported by other analyses (clinical signs, disc height index, T2 values, biomolecular and biochemical analyses, and IVD histopathology). PEAs showed a good cytocompatibility and biocompatibility. PEAMs are considered safe sustained release systems for intradiscal delivery of biological treatments. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
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    ABSTRACT: This work reports the second part of a review on synthetic surgical meshes used for abdominal hernia repair. While material and structural characteristics, together with mesh–tissue interaction, were considered in a previous article (Part I), biomechanical behavior is described here in more detail. The role of the prosthesis is to strengthen the impaired abdominal wall, mimicking autologous tissue without reducing its compliance. Consequently, mesh mechanical properties play a crucial role in a successful surgical repair. The main available techniques for mechanical testing, such as uniaxial and biaxial tensile testing, ball burst, suture retention strength, and tear resistance testing, are described in depth. Among these methods, the biaxial tensile test is the one that can more faithfully reproduce the physiological loading condition. An outline of the most significant results documented in the literature is reported, showing the variety of data on mesh mechanical properties. Synthetic surgical meshes generally follow a non-linear stress–strain behavior, with mechanical characteristics dependant on test direction due to mesh anisotropy. Ex-vivo tests revealed an increased stiffness in mesh explants due to the gradual ingrowth of the host tissue after implant. In general, the absence of standardization in test methods and terminology makes it difficult to compare results from different studies. Numerical models of the abdominal wall interacting with surgical meshes were also discussed representing a potential tool for the selection of suitable prostheses.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
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    ABSTRACT: Although docetaxel is available for the treatment of various cancers, its clinical applications are limited by its poor water solubility and toxicity to normal cells, resulting in severe adverse effects. In this study, we synthesized a polymeric conjugate with an acid-labile ester linkage, consisting of carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) and docetaxel (DTX), as a potential anticancer drug delivery system. The conjugate exhibited sustained release of DTX in physiological buffer (pH 7.4), whereas its release rate increased remarkably under mildly acidic conditions (pH < 6.5), mimicking the intracellular environment. Cytotoxicity tests conducted in vitro demonstrated that the conjugate exhibited much higher toxicity to cancer cells under mildly acidic conditions than at physiological buffer (pH 7.4). These results implied that the ester linkage in the conjugate allowed for selective release of biologically active DTX under mildly acidic conditions. The in vivo biodistribution of a Cy5.5-labeled conjugate was observed using the noninvasive optical imaging technique after its systemic administration into tumor-bearing mice. The conjugate was effectively accumulated into the tumor site, which may have been because of an enhanced permeability and retention effect. In addition, in vivo antitumor efficacy of the conjugate was significantly higher than that of free DTX. Overall, the CMD-based conjugate might have promising potential as a carrier of DTX for cancer therapy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
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    ABSTRACT: Hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles were synthesized using a wet mechanochemical method without a calcination process. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO4 ·2H2 O) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) were mixed and milled in a planary mill using ethanol or water as liquid media in the two different synthesized routes. Effects of rotation speed and milling time on the final products formed have been studied. Experimental results showed that HA phase having a characteristic of low crystallinity could be formed under the synthesis route using water. The original phases of both starting chemicals were remained without HA formation in the synthesis route using ethanol. Particle size and morphology of HA nanoparticles were obviously depended on optimum conditions of rotation speed and milling time. Differences on phase formation in both synthesized routes have been considered and discussed based on occurring chemical reaction possibilities. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials
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    ABSTRACT: Research on nanometer-sized luminescent semiconductors and their biological applications in detectors and contrasting agents is an emergent field in nanotechnology. When new nanosize technologies are developed for human health applications, their interaction with biological systems should be studied in depth. Rare-earth elements are used in medical and industrial applications, but their toxic effects are not known. In this work, the biological interaction between terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide nanoparticles (GOSNPs) with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), human-derived macrophages (THP-1), and human cervical carcinoma cell (HeLa) were evaluated. The GOSNPs were synthetized using a hydrothermal method to obtain monodisperse nanoparticles with an average size of 91 ± 9 nm. Characterization techniques showed the hexagonal phase of the Gd2 O2 S:Tb(3+) free of impurities, and a strong green emission at λemi = 544 nm produced by Tb(3+) was observed. Toxic effects of GOSNPs were evaluated using cell viability, apoptosis, cell-cycle progression, and immunological response techniques. In addition, an Artemia model was used to assess the toxicity in vivo. Results indicated cell apoptosis in both types of cells with less sensitivity for PBMC cells compared to HeLa cells. In addition, no toxic effects were observed in the in vivo model of Artemia. Moreover, GOSNPs significantly reduced the activation and cell-cycle progression of PBMC and HeLa cells, respectively. Interestingly, an increase in proinflammatory cytokines was not observed. Our data suggest that fluorescence applications of GOSNPs for biolabeling are not toxic in primary immune cells and they may have an immunomodulatory effect. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2015.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials