Journal of the American Pharmacists Association

Publisher: American Pharmacists Association

Journal description

The Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, the official peer-reviewed journal of the American Pharmacists Association, provides members with articles and columns on pharmaceutical care, drug therapy, diseases and other health issues, trends in pharmacy practice and therapeutics, informed opinion, and original research.

Current impact factor: 1.24

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.238

Additional details

5-year impact 1.35
Cited half-life 8.30
Immediacy index 0.28
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.35
Website Journal of the American Pharmacists Association: JAPhA website
Other titles Journal of the American Pharmacists Association (1996: Online), Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, JAPhA
ISSN 1544-3450
OCLC 52032194
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To provide experience on the methods and costs for delivering a large-scale community pharmacist home visit service. Setting: Independent urban community pharmacy, Buffalo, NY. Practice description: Mobile Pharmacy Solutions provides traditional community pharmacy walk-in service and a suite of clinically oriented services, including outbound adherence calls linked to home delivery, payment planning, medication refill synchronization, adherence packaging, and pharmacist home visits. Pharmacist daily staffing included three dispensing pharmacists, one residency-trained pharmacist, and two postgraduate year 1 community pharmacy residents. Practice innovation: A large-scale community pharmacy home visit service delivered over a 1-year period. Evaluation: Pharmacist time and cost to administer the home visit service as well as home visit request sources and description of patient demographics. Results: A total of 172 visits were conducted (137 initial, 35 follow-up). Patients who received a home visit averaged 9.8 ± 5.2 medications and 3.0 ± 1.6 chronic disease states. On average, a home visit required 2.0 ± 0.8 hours, which included travel time. The percentages of visits completed by pharmacists and residents were 60% and 40%, respectively. The amounts of time to complete a visit were similar. Average home visit cost including pharmacist time and travel was $119 ($147 for a pharmacist, $77 for a resident). Conclusion: In this community pharmacy-based home visit service, costs are an important factor, with each pharmacist visit requiring 2 hours to complete. This experience provides a blueprint and real-world perspective for community pharmacies endeavoring to implement a home visit service and sets a foundation for future prospective trials to evaluate the impact of the service on important indicators of health and cost.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To describe the percentage of pediatric outpatient pharmacy prescriptions with inappropriate prescribing identified by a pharmacist that resulted in a change to the prescription. Secondary objectives include describing types of inappropriate prescribing errors, prevalence of Institute of Safe Medication Practices high-alert medications, patient demographics, prescriber origin, and prescription origin. Methods: This retrospective outpatient prescription record review was approved by an institutional review board and performed at an outpatient pharmacy located in an academic teaching hospital. The study reviewed pediatric outpatient prescriptions for a 6-month period. Prescriptions with prescribing errors were identified from pediatric prescriptions sent to the problem queue and documented with appropriate pharmacist notes. Results: This study demonstrated the impact of a dose checking procedure and pharmacist interventions on pediatric prescriptions. Initial results show that 3% of all pediatric prescriptions required a pharmacist intervention. Of these prescriptions, 50% resulted in a change to the original prescription. Conclusion: Weight-based dose checking in a pediatric outpatient pharmacy proactively prevents potential adverse events among the pediatric population. Despite this study's limitations, we believe that a pediatric dose checking procedure in community pharmacies will reduce adverse events. Further study is warranted in this field.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To examine what medications are most frequently left unused by patients, how much is left unused, and how these medications are disposed of among Medicare beneficiaries. Design: Secondary data analysis combining insurance claims and telephone survey data of Medicare Advantage members. Setting: Regional health plan in Central Pennsylvania. Participants: Seven hundred twenty-one Medicare Advantage members who had Part D coverage through the plan as of December 31, 2013, and completed the telephone survey in May 2014. Intervention: Telephone survey conducted by a survey research center. Main outcome measure: Member survey response. Results: Of the 2,994 medications in the dataset, 247 (8%) were reported being left unused by patients. Of the 247, the most common medications were those for pain (15%), hypertension (14%), antibiotics (11%), and psychiatric disorders (9%). Approximately 15% of unused medications were controlled substances. The reasons for being unused varied by drug type. For example, for pain medications, adverse effects and overprescribing were the most commonly cited reasons; for hypertension medications, "dosage changed by doctor" was the most common reason. Most commonly, unused portions accounted for approximately 25% to 50% of the unused medications identified by patients. Approximately 11% of unused medication was disposed of via drug take-back programs, whereas the majority was kept in a cabinet (55%), thrown in the trash (14%), or flushed down the toilet (9%). Conclusion: A lack of patient adherence alone does not explain unused medications and their improper disposal. Community-level interventions designed to improve prescription efficiency and patient awareness of appropriate disposal methods-particularly of controlled substances-are necessary to reduce the potentially harmful effects of improper disposal of unused medications.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To examine the effectiveness of collaborative physician-community pharmacist programs to treat influenza-like illness (ILI) with respect to clinical outcomes and health care utilization. Design: Prospective multicenter cohort study. Setting: Fifty-five pharmacies in Michigan, Minnesota, and Nebraska. Patients: Adult patients presenting to the pharmacy with ILI during the 2013-14 influenza season (October 1, 2013 to May 30, 2014). Intervention: Pharmacists screened adult patients presenting with ILI, completed a brief physical assessment, performed a point-of-care rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT), and provided appropriate referral or treatment per an established collaborative practice agreement (CPA) with a licensed prescriber. Pharmacists followed-up with patients 24 to 48 hours after the encounter to assess patient status and possible need for further intervention. Main outcome measures: Number of patients screened, tested, and treated for influenza. Results: Of the 121 patients screened, 45 (37%) were excluded and referred to their primary care provider or an urgent care facility for management. Of the 75 patients (62%) eligible for participation, 8 (11%) had a positive RIDT and were managed according to the CPA. Of the patients tested, 34.6% had no primary care physician and 38.7% visited the pharmacy outside of normal office hours. Only 3% of patients reported feeling worse at follow-up. Conclusion: This study describes a physician-pharmacist collaborative model for treating ILI. Using an evidence-based CPA, pharmacists were able to provide timely treatment to patients with and without influenza.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the design, implementation, and early experience of the SafeMed program, which uses certified pharmacy technicians in a novel expanded role as community health workers (CPhT-CHWs) to improve transitions of care.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To compare the accuracy of open-access medication identification databases in identifying commonly prescribed oral tablets and capsules. Methods: We compiled a dataset from the most frequently prescribed medications in 2012 and 2013 by total prescription volume. Imprints for the medications were obtained from the Food and Drug Administration label information accessed via the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) DailyMed. The imprints were used to determine if the correct medication could be identified in the open-access medication identification databases Drugs.com, Healthline, NLM's Pillbox, RxList, and WebMD by means of the imprints alone. A general web search using the imprints as key words via Google search engine was also conducted to mimic the lay public's approach to identifying an unknown medication. Results: Database accuracy of search results ranged from 26.5% to 89.27% with the NLM Pillbox having the highest accuracy when using tablet/capsule imprint information alone. The secondary web search with the use of the Google search engine yielded 75.7% accuracy in using imprints as search terms to identify websites leading to the appropriate drugs. Drugs.com was listed as the first site for the majority of Google searches and was 86.44% accurate. Conclusion: Open-access databases are available to help identify oral tablets and capsules and they have a relatively high success rate of identifying commonly prescribed medications. However no database is 100% accurate, which means that the risk involved with patients identifying their own medications is substantial. Patients should be highly encouraged by all health care practitioners to consult their pharmacist or primary health care provider to prevent misidentification and subsequent misadministration.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the impact of the RxVaccinate program on the structure, process, and outcome measures and to assess team leaders' perceptions of the program.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Background: A new service model integrates the specialty pharmacy's comprehensive service with the retail pharmacy's patient contact, giving patients options for medication delivery to home, pharmacy, or doctor's office. Objective: Evaluate the impact of the new service model on medication adherence. Design: Retrospective cohort study SETTINGS: One hundred fifteen CVS retail stores in Philadelphia participated in a pilot from May 2012 to October 2013, and 115 matched CVS retail stores from around the nation served as controls. Patients: All eligible patients from the intervention and control stores received specialty medications through CVS retail pharmacies prior to implementation of the new service model. Intervention: The intervention patients were transitioned from retail pharmacy service to the specialty pharmacy with delivery options. The control patients received standard retail pharmacy services. Main outcome measures: Proportion of days covered and first fill persistence were tracked for 12 months before and after program implementation. Results: Under the new service model, 228 patients new to therapy in the post period had a 17.5% increase in the rate of obtaining a second fill as compared to matched controls. Patients on therapy in both the pre- and the post-periods had a pre-post increase of 6.6% in average adherence rates and a pre-post increase of 10.8% in optimal adherence rates as compared to 326 matched controls. Conclusion: The study demonstrated significant improvement in both adherence to therapy and first-fill persistence among patients in the new service model integrating specialty pharmacy's comprehensive services with the retail pharmacy's patient contact and medication delivery choices.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To highlight ways in which pharmacists can influence the infant mortality rate. Summary: The infant mortality rate in the United States is higher than in many other industrialized nations. Because pharmacists are accessible and knowledgeable health care professionals, there are multiple opportunities for pharmacist intervention from the preconception to the postpartum periods that can affect the leading causes of infant death. Specifically, areas of focus for pharmacists' direct patient care activities can include family planning, substance use, folic acid, drug information, maternal disease management, maternal medication management, infant medication management, safe sleep, breastfeeding, and vaccines. In addition, there are opportunities for pharmacists to influence infant mortality through clinical-community linkages, research, and advocacy. Conclusions: Through clinical-community linkages and direct patient care, pharmacists can work toward reducing infant mortality in their communities.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To determine the mobile application features for pharmacy services sought after by patients of a grocery store chain pharmacy. Methods: Key informant interviews were conducted at 5 Giant Eagle Pharmacy locations in the Greater Pittsburgh area. Patients older than 35 years who receive 1 prescription monthly from Giant Eagle and use a smartphone daily were eligible to participate. Interviews were audio recorded, and transcripts underwent thematic analysis. Results: Twenty-four interviews were conducted from February to March 2014. The average age of participants was 51 years. About one-half of the participants (46%) were currently using mobile applications to manage their health. Three themes emerged regarding patients' desires for a mobile application: design that fosters an improved, convenient pharmacy experience; features that support the self-management of health; and design that increases personalized, timely access to pharmacists. Conclusion: This qualitative analysis revealed that pharmacy patients desire a mobile application that improves the convenience of their pharmacy experience, enables them to self-manage their health, and increases their access to their pharmacist.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The use of fall risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs) by older adults is one factor associated with falling, and FRID use is common among older adults. A targeted medication therapy management intervention focused on FRID use that included prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) medications, along with follow-up telephone calls was designed. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to examine preliminary effects of a medication therapy management (MTM) intervention focused on FRIDs provided by a community pharmacist to older adults. Design: Randomized, controlled trial. Setting: One community pharmacy. Participants: Eighty older adults who completed a fall prevention workshop. Main outcome measures: The main outcome measures were the rate of discontinuing FRIDs, the proportion of older adults falling, and the number of falls. A secondary outcome was the acceptance rate of medication recommendations by patients and prescribers. Results: Thirty-eight older adults received the targeted MTM intervention. Of the 31 older adults using a FRID, a larger proportion in the intervention group had FRID use modified relative to controls (77% and 28%, respectively; P < 0.05). There were no significant changes between the study groups in the risk and rate of falling. Medication recommendations in the intervention group had a 75% acceptance rate by patients and prescribers. Conclusion: A targeted MTM intervention provided by a community pharmacist and focused on FRID use among older adults was effective in modifying FRID use. This result supports the preliminary conclusion that community pharmacists can play an important role in modifying FRID use among older adults.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To user-test and evaluate a performance information management platform that makes standardized, benchmarked medication use quality data available to both health plans and community pharmacy organizations. Setting: Multiple health/drug plans and multiple chain and independent pharmacies across the United States. Evaluation: During the first phase of the study, user experience was measured via user satisfaction surveys and interviews with key personnel (pharmacists, pharmacy leaders, and health plan leadership). Improvements were subsequently made to the platform based on these findings. During the second phase of the study, the platform was implemented in a greater number of pharmacies and by a greater number of payers. User experience was then reevaluated to gather information for further improvements. Results: The surveys and interviews revealed that users found the Web-based platform easy to use and beneficial in terms of understanding and comparing performance metrics. Primary concerns included lack of access to real-time data and patient-specific data. Many users also expressed uncertainty as to how they could use the information and data provided by the platform. Conclusion: The study findings indicate that while information management platforms can be used effectively in both pharmacy and health plan settings, future development is needed to ensure that the provided data can be transferred to pharmacy best practices and improved quality care.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To describe the experiences and opinions of pharmacists serving as site coordinators for the Medication Safety Research Network of Indiana (Rx-SafeNet). Setting: Retail chain, independent, and hospital/health system outpatient community pharmacies throughout Indiana, with a total of 127 pharmacy members represented by 26 site coordinators. Practice description: Rx-SafeNet, a statewide practice-based research network (PBRN) formed in 2010 and administered by the Purdue University College of Pharmacy. Main outcome measures: Barriers and facilitators to participation in available research studies, confidence participating in research, and satisfaction with overall network communication. Results: 22 of 26 site coordinators participated, resulting in an 85% response rate. Most (72.2%) of the respondents had received a doctor of pharmacy degree, and 13.6% had postgraduate year (PGY)1 residency training. The highest reported benefits of PBRN membership were an enhanced relationship with the Purdue University College of Pharmacy (81% agreed or strongly agreed) and enhanced professional development (80% agreed or strongly agreed). Time constraints were identified as the greatest potential barrier to network participation, reported by 62% of respondents. In addition, the majority (59%) of survey respondents identified no prior research experience. Last, respondents' confidence in performing research appeared to increase substantially after becoming network members, with 43% reporting a lack of confidence in engaging in research before joining the network compared with 90% reporting confidence after joining the network. Conclusion: In general, Rx-SafeNet site coordinators appeared to experience increased confidence in research engagement after joining the network. While respondents identified a number of benefits associated with network participation, concerns about potential time constraints remained a key barrier to participation. These findings will assist network leadership in identifying opportunities to positively increase member participation in the future.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of the American Pharmacists Association