Journal of physical activity & health (J Phys Activ Health)

Publisher: Human Kinetics

Journal description

The Journal of Physical Activity and Health (JPAH) publishes original research and review papers examining the relationship between physical activity and health, studying physical activity as an exposure as well as an outcome. As an exposure, the journal publishes articles examining how physical activity influences all aspects of health. As an outcome, the journal invites papers that examine the behavioral, community, and environmental interventions that may affect physical activity on an individual and/or population basis. The JPAH is an interdisciplinary journal published for researchers in fields of chronic disease (e.g., cancer, heart disease, mental health, weight control, neurologic deficits, etc.) where physical activity may play a role in prevention, treatment, or rehabilitation.

Current impact factor: 1.95

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 3.30
Immediacy index 0.44
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.00
Website Journal of Physical Activity and Health website
Other titles Journal of physical activity & health, Journal of physical activity and health, JPAH
ISSN 1543-3080
OCLC 51531702
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Human Kinetics

  • Pre-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's post-print only (in PDF or other image capture format)
    • On the author's personal website(s) or institutional repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statement to accompany deposit "as accepted for publication"
    • Publisher last contacted on 05/12/2013
  • Classification
    blue

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Physical inactivity in elderly is a public health problem. The purpose of this study is describe and test the association between social support and leisure-time physical activity among the elderly. Methods: a cross-sectional, population-based study with 1,285 subjects (60+years old) living in a city in southern Brazil was carried out in 2014. Physical activity practice was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (leisure domain: at least 150 minutes per week of walking+moderate physical activity+2 (vigorous physical activity)), while social support was measured using the Physical Activity Social Support Scale. Results: The prevalence of elderly who reached the recommendations of leisure-time physical activity was 18.4%. The elderly persons who had the company of family or friends to walk had a 2.45 times higher prevalence of reaching the recommendations of physical activity in leisure than those who did not. Those who had company of friends to practice MVPA were 3.23 more likely to reach physical activity recommendations than their counterparts. The least common social support was the joint practice for walking and for MVPA. Conclusion: Strategies that incentive family members and friends to provide social support to the elderly for physical activity focusing on joint practice must be encouraged.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The aim of this study was to review the evidence to date on the association between physical activity and safety from crime. Methods: Articles with adult populations of 500+ participants investigating the association between physical activity and safety from crime were included. A methodological quality assessment was conducted using an adapted version of the Downs and Black checklist. Results: The literature search identified 15,864 articles. After assessment of titles, abstracts and full-texts, 89 articles were included. Most articles (84.3%) were derived from high-income countries and only three prospective articles were identified. Articles presented high methodological quality. In 38 articles (42.7%), at least one statistically significant association in the expected direction was reported, i.e. safety from crime was positively associated with physical activity. Nine articles (10.1%) found an association in the unexpected direction and 42 (47.2%) did not find statistically significant associations. The results did not change when we analyzed articles separately by sex, age, type of measurement or domains of physical activity evaluated. Conclusion: The current evidence, mostly based on cross-sectional studies, suggests a lack of association between physical activity and safety from crime. Prospective studies and natural experiments are needed, particularly in areas with wide crime variability.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Little is known about the relationship between children's physical activity (PA) in preschool (In-School) and outside of preschool (Out-of-School). This study described this relationship. Methods: Participants were 341 children (4.6 ± 0.3 years) in 16 preschools. Accelerometers measured moderate-to-vigorous and total PA (MVPA, TPA) In-School and Out-of-School. In the full sample, Pearson correlation was used to describe associations between In-School and Out-of-School PA. Also, children were categorized as meeting or not meeting a PA guideline during school. MVPA and TPA were compared between the two groups and In-School and Out-of-School using 2-way repeated measures ANOVA. Results: In the full sample, In-School and Out-of-School PA were positively correlated for MVPA (r = .13, P = .02) and TPA (r = .15, P = .01). Children who met the guideline In-School remained comparably active Out-of-School. However, those who did not meet the guideline were more active Out-of-School than In-School. The groups were active at comparable levels while out-of-school. Identical patterns were seen for MVPA and TPA. Conclusions: Children's In-School PA was positively associated with Out-of-School PA. Children who did not meet the guideline In-School were more active Out-of-School than In-School, suggesting preschool and classroom factors may reduce some children's PA In-School.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Reduction of ectopic fat accumulation plays an important role in the prevention of insulin resistance in people with overweight or obesity. This systematic review and meta-analysis summarizes the current evidence for the use of non-invasive weight loss interventions (exercise or diet) on ectopic fat. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed according to the PRISMA statement. Clinical trials in PubMed, PEDro, and the Cochrane database were searched. Results: All 33 included studies described the effect of lifestyle interventions on ectopic fat storage in internal organs (liver, heart and pancreas) and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL), hereby including 1146, 157, 87 and 336 participants. Overall, a significant decrease of ectopic fat was found in liver (-0.53 Hedges' g, p<0.001), heart (- 0.72 Hedges' g, p<0.001) and pancreas (-0.55 Hedges' g, p = 0.098) respectively. A trend towards decrease in IMCL was also observed. Meta-regression indicated a dose-response relationship between BMI reduction and decreased hepatic adiposity. Exercise alone decreased ectopic fat but the effect was greater when combined with diet. Conclusion: Lifestyle interventions can reduce ectopic fat accumulation in the internal organs of overweight and obese adults. The results on IMCL should be interpreted with care, keeping the 'athlete's paradox' in mind.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Identifying strategies to increase energy expenditure (EE) may help combat the harmful effects of sedentary behavior. This study examined EE during sitting, standing, and walking. Methods: Participants (N=74) were randomized to two of the following activities: sitting using a laptop computer (SIT-C), sitting watching television (SIT-T), standing watching television (STAND), and walking at a self-selected pace ≤3.0 (mph) (WALK). Each activity lasted 15 minutes with a three minute transition period between activities. The experimental conditions were: SIT-C to STAND (N=18), SIT-T to WALK (N=18), STAND to SIT-C (N=20), and WALK to SIT-T (N=18). EE was measured using indirect calorimetry. Results: Based on the first activity performed, EE during WALK (55.92±14.19 kcal) was significantly greater than SIT-C (19.63±6.90 kcal), SIT-T (18.66±4.01 kcal), and STAND (21.92±5.08 kcal) (p<0.001). Cumulative EE in SIT-T to WALK (74.50±17.88 kcal) and WALK to SIT-T (82.72±21.70 kcal) was significantly greater than EE in SIT-C to STAND (45.38±14.78 kcal) and STAND to SIT-C (45.64±9.69 kcal) (p<0.001). Conclusion: Substituting periods of sitting or standing with walking significantly increases EE, but substituting periods of sitting with standing may not affect EE. Thus, the potential benefits of standing as opposed to sitting need further investigation beyond the role of EE.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Since exercise increases the production of reactive oxygen species in different tissues, the objective of this study is to evaluate, compare and correlate the acute effects of aerobic and resistance exercise in circulatory markers of oxidative stress and acylated ghrelin (AG) in postmenopausal women. Methods: Ten postmenopausal women completed different protocols: a control session (CON), an aerobic exercise session (AERO); and a single-set (SSR) or three-set (MSR) resistance exercise protocol. Results: After exercise, both MSR (p=0.06) and AERO (p=0.02) sessions showed significant increased lipid peroxidation compared to baseline levels. CON and SSR sessions showed no differences after exercise. No differences were found between sessions at any time for total glutathione, glutathione dissulfide or AG concentrations. Conclusions: Exercise significantly increased lipid peroxidation compared to baseline values. As pro oxidant stimuli is necessary to promote chronic adaptations to the antioxidant defenses induced by exercise, our findings are important to consider when evaluating exercise programs prescription variables aiming quality of life in this population.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: We aimed to explore the association between self-reported leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP) in men and women with and without impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Methods: In a cross-sectional study, a random sample (n=2816) was examined with an oral glucose tolerance test, CRP and information about LTPA. Those with IGT or normal glucose tolerance and CRP value ≤10 mg/L were selected (n = 2367) for the study. Results: An inverse association between LTPA and CRP concentrations was observed in the population (P<0.001), though, only in men with IGT (P=0.023) and in women with normal glucose tolerance. Men with IGT, reporting slight physical activity up to four hours a week presented significantly higher CRP concentrations than normoglycemic men (Δ0.6 mg/L, P = 0.004). However, this difference could not be found in men with IGT reporting more intense physical activity (Δ0.01 mg/L, P = 0.944). Conclusions: Physical inactivity seems to have greater inflammatory consequences for men (vs. women) with IGT. More importantly, although four hours of physical activity per week is more than the usual minimum recommendation, an even greater intensity of LTPA appears to be required to limit subclinical inflammation in men with IGT.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Understanding the built environment influence on specific domains of walking is important for public health interventions to increase physical activity levels among older adults. Purpose: To investigate the association between built environment characteristics and walking among older adults. Methods: A population-based study was performed in 80 census tracts in Florianopolis, Brazil, including 1,705 older adults (60+ years). Walking was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Built environment characteristics were assessed through Geographic Information System (GIS). All analyses were conducted through a multilevel logistic regression. Results: Individuals living in neighborhoods with higher population density (OR: 2.19; 95%CI: 1.40; 3.42), with higher street connectivity (OR: 1.85; 95%CI: 1.16; 2,94), higher sidewalk proportion (OR: 1.77; 95%CI: 1.11; 2.83) and paved streets (medium tertile: OR: 1.61, 95%CI: 1.04; 2.49; highest tertile: OR: 2.11; 95%CI: 1.36; 3.27) were more likely to walk for transportation. Regarding walking for leisure, only two predictors were associated, area income (OR: 1.48; 95%CI: 1.04; 2.12) and street density (OR: 1.47; 95%CI: 1.02; 2.10). Conclusions: Improving the neighborhood built environment is an important step for achieving higher levels of walking in the elderly population in a middle-income country.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The purpose of this study was to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parental support and children's physical activity outside of child care, and whether children's age or sex moderated the associations. Methods: Results are based on 93 children aged 19-60 months at baseline from eight child care centers across Alberta, Canada. Parental support (i.e., transportation, co-activity, watching, encouragement, and informing) and children's physical activity outside of child care were measured with a parental questionnaire at baseline (October/November, 2013) and follow-up (May/June, 2014). Results: Every additional unit increase in parental support was significantly associated with 48.5 minutes/week (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 29.3, 67.6) and 52.2 (95% CI: 32.0, 72.3) minutes/week higher parental reported children's physical activity outside of child care at baseline and follow-up, respectively. A 1-unit increase in parental support from baseline to follow-up was significantly associated with a 24.8 (95% CI: 2.8, 46.8) minutes/week increase in parental reported children's physical activity outside of child care. Children's age was a moderator at baseline only. Conclusions: Parental support was positively associated with children's physical activity across all analyses. Parental support may be an important correlate to target in future interventions aiming to promote physical activity in the early years.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Innovative methods are warranted to optimize prenatal outcomes. This study's objective was to determine if a web-based behavioral intervention can prevent excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) by increasing physical activity (PA). Methods: Participants were randomized to usual care (UC; n=21) or behavioral intervention (BI; n=24) between 10-14 weeks gestation. GWG, PA and diet were assessed at baseline, mid- and late-pregnancy. Results: No differences in GWG or adherence to GWG recommendations presented between groups. Total UC MET-minutes significantly decreased from baseline to late-pregnancy (1234 ± 372 MET-minutes, P = 0.013). Mid-pregnancy sustained PA was greater for BI than UC (20-min PA bouts: 122 ± 106 vs 46 ± 48 mins/week, P = 0.005; 30-min PA bouts: 74 ± 70 vs 14 ± 24 mins/week, P < 0.001), and greater for BI at mid-pregnancy compared to baseline (20-min PA bouts: 61.3 ± 21.9; 30-min PA bouts: 39.6 ± 14.8, both P <0.05). BI energy intake at mid-pregnancy significantly increased from baseline (336 ± 127 kcals, P = 0.04) and was significantly greater than UC (2503 ± 703 vs 1894 ± 594, P = 0.005). Conclusions: Sedentary pregnant women should increase PA but may need additional dietary counseling to prevent excessive GWG.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: An increased occurrence of lifestyle-related diseases such as osteoporosis indicates the necessity for taking preventive action, including regularly engaging in physical activity. The aim of the study was to assess the areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and bone turnover markers levels in young adult women engaging in recreational horseback riding and to determine the relationship between training characteristics and bone metabolism indices. Methods: The study involved 43 women: 23 equestrians and 20 age- and body mass index-matched controls. The hip and spine aBMD and serum levels of the bone turnover markers: osteocalcin and collagen type I cross-linked C-telopeptide were measured. Results: No significant differences were found in somatic features, concentrations of bone turnover markers, or bone mass variables. Correlation analysis of the equestrian participants showed significant relationship between body mass and BMDL1-L4 (P < 0.05) as well as between BMI and BMDL1-L4 (P ≤ 0.01) and Z-score L1-L4 (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The study showed no differences in bone mass and levels of bone metabolic indices between groups of women practicing horseback riding at the recreational level and subjects who do not participate in frequent systematic physical activity. No relationship between training characteristics and bone turnover markers were found.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Maternal physical activity declines across gestation, possibly due to changing perception of physical activity intensity. Our purpose was to a) determine whether rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during a treadmill exercise changes at a given energy expenditure, and b) identify the influence of prepregnancy physical activity behavior on this relationship. Methods: Fifty-one subjects were classified as either exercisers (N = 26) or sedentary (N = 25). Participants visited our laboratory at 20 and 32 weeks gestation and at 12 weeks postpartum. At each visit, women performed 5 minutes of moderate and vigorous treadmill exercise; speed was self-selected. Heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (VO2), and RPE were measured during the last minute at each treadmill intensity. Results: At moderate intensity, postpartum VO2 was higher compared with 20- or 32-week VO2, but there was no difference for HR or RPE. For vigorous intensity, postpartum HR and VO2 were higher than at 32 weeks, but RPE was not different at any time points. Conclusions: RPE does not differ by pregnancy time point at either moderate or vigorous intensity. However, relative to energy cost, physical activity was perceived to be more difficult at 32 weeks compared with other time points. Pregnant women, then, may compensate for physiological changes during gestation by decreasing walking/running speeds.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of physical activity & health