Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ (ADAPT PHYS ACT Q)

Publisher: Human Kinetics

Journal description

The official journal of the International Federation of Adapted Physical Activity, this multidisciplinary journal provides the latest scholarly inquiry related to physical activity for special populations. Regular features include case studies; techniques for adapting equipment, facilities, methodology, and settings; editorial commentary; article abstracts; and book reviews.

Current impact factor: 1.32

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.324
2013 Impact Factor 1.079
2012 Impact Factor 1.125
2011 Impact Factor 1.487
2010 Impact Factor 1.189
2009 Impact Factor 0.947
2008 Impact Factor 0.837
2007 Impact Factor 0.804
2006 Impact Factor 1.217
2005 Impact Factor 0.717
2004 Impact Factor 0.846
2003 Impact Factor 0.964
2002 Impact Factor 1.2
2001 Impact Factor 1
2000 Impact Factor 1.312
1999 Impact Factor 1.261
1998 Impact Factor 0.4

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.54
Cited half-life >10.0
Immediacy index 0.25
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.41
Website Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly (APAQ) website
Other titles Adapted physical activity quarterly, APAQ
ISSN 1543-2777
OCLC 9159651
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Human Kinetics

  • Pre-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's post-print only (in PDF or other image capture format)
    • On the author's personal website(s) or institutional repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statement to accompany deposit "as accepted for publication"
    • Publisher last contacted on 05/12/2013
  • Classification
    blue

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study compared the physical performance of Paralympic sprinters with visual impairments (PSVI) and their guides in jump/sprint tests. Ten PSVI and guides executed squat-jumps (SJ), countermovement-jumps (CMJ), horizontal-quintuple right/left leg jumps (QR/QL), decuple-jumps (DEC) and 50-m sprint tests. The guides were superior to the PSVI in SJ (35.9 ± 6.3 vs. 45.6 ± 3.2 cm), CMJ (38.5 ± 6.2 vs. 46.7 ± 4.0 cm), QR (9.2 ± 1.9 vs. 12.7 ± 1.0 m), QL (9.4 ± 1.9 vs. 13.1 ± 0.8 m), DEC (21.0 ± 3.3 vs. 27.2 ± 1.7 m), and 50-m sprints (8.4 ± 0.4 vs. 7.6 ± 0.5 m.s-1). The average differences between the PSVI and their guides in the sprint tests amounted to 10%, varying between 1-24%. Therefore, substantial differences in sprinting speed (in favor of the guides) between the peers were observed. Coaches should develop new strategies to train the guides to improve their muscle power performance.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many children with disabling conditions do not acquire the skills to successfully ride a 2-wheeled bicycle. The aim was to describe cycling patterns before and after an innovative learn-to-ride bike camp and factors that facilitate or hinder the generalization of skills developed at camp to home. Parents and children participated in semistructured interviews 3-4 mo postcamp. Transcripts were examined deductively for participation and contextual influences using a template of codes approach. None of the children were successfully riding a 2-wheeled bicycle before camp. Two patterns of participation were evident from narrative descriptions of postcamp riding: "riders" and "not there yet." Major facilitating factors were the camp itself, the interaction between the camp and the health service, and continued parent involvement. The program transferred well to home for children who were riding independently on the last day of camp. Ongoing support is needed for children "not there yet."
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study analyzed newspaper coverage of the 2012 London Paralympic Games by 8 Malaysian newspapers. Articles and photographs from 4 English-language and 4 Malay-language newspapers were examined from August 28 (1 day before the Games) to September 10, 2012 (1 day after the Games closing). Tables, graphs, letters, fact boxes, and lists of events were excluded from analysis. A total of 132 articles and 131 photographs were analyzed. Content analysis of the newspaper articles revealed that most (62.8%) of the articles contained positive reference to the athletes with a disability. There were equal numbers (39.1%) of action and static shots of athletes. More articles and photographs of Malaysian (58%) than non-Malaysian (42%) athletes with a disability were identified. Only 14.9% of the articles and photographs were related to female athletes with a disability.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ
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    ABSTRACT: The study aimed to investigate the impact of an 8-wk structured physical activity program on selected psychosocial behaviors of children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and to estimate whether generalization occurred. Thirty children (22 boys, 8 girls) with mild ID took part in the study. The ANCOVA results showed a significant difference between the training group and the control group in emotional self-control mean scores, F(1, 25) = 7.61, p = .011, with the posttest mean score of the training group being better than that of the control group. The correlation analysis showed a medium, positive correlation between the gain scores of emotional self-control in the training context and classroom context of the training group (r = .41, n = 16, p = .12). Hence, generalization appeared to have occurred.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the article by Haegele, J.A., Lee, L., & Porretta, D.L., "Research trends in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly from 2004 to 2013," in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 32(3), 187-205, an incorrect DOI was printed. The correct DOI for that article is http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/APAQ.2014-0232.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among release factors (speed, height, and angle) and distance thrown in Paralympic seated shot put. Forty-eight trials performed by 11 men and 5 women during the 2012 US Paralympic trials in track and field were analyzed. With both genders combined, release speed (r = .95, p < .01) and angle (r = .51, p < .01) showed significant correlations to distance thrown. Release speed (r = .94, p < .01) in men and all release factors (r = .60-.98, p < .02) in women showed significant correlations to distance. Release speed and angle were identified as important predictors of the distance, explaining over 89-96% of the variance in distance thrown. Unlike athletes without disability, seated shot-putters exhibited significant positive speed-angle correlations (combined: r = .37, p < .01; women: r = .57, p = .03). Application of these results should address a focus in training on generating speed through the release point with a consistent release angle.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The authors compared physical activity enjoyment, perceived barriers, beliefs, and self-efficacy between adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) adolescents. A questionnaire was verbally administered to 35 adolescents with ASD and 60 TD adolescents. Compared with TD adolescents, fewer adolescents with ASD enjoyed team sports (65% vs. 95%, p < .001) and physical education (84% vs. 98%, p = .02). A greater proportion of adolescents with ASD perceived that physical activities were too hard to learn (16% vs. 0%, p < .01), and fewer believed that physical activity was a way to make friends (68% vs. 97%, p < .001). Fewer adolescents with ASD preferred to do physical activity in their free time (25% vs. 58%, p < .01). Most adolescents with ASD felt that physical activity is fun (84%), but the proportion was lower than in TD adolescents (98%, p = .03). Some perceptions about physical activity were similar between the 2 groups, but differences identified may inform program development.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since the first Paralympics in 1960 there has been an increase in social and scientific interest in Paralympic athletes' personality, their preparation, and their sport results. During the last 20 yr, researchers and practitioners have been focused on psychological-skills programs for athletes with disabilities. The purpose of this article was to describe a psychological-preparation program for Israeli Paralympic athletes. Two subprograms, the learning-modification-application approach and the Simulation Training Exercise Program, were adapted to athletes' disability and sport demands. Two case studies, from table tennis and sailing (Sonar 3-person keelboat), are described to demonstrate how systematic sport psychology preparation can be effectively integrated into the training process of Paralympic athletes. Some recommendations for Paralympic athletes are presented.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Adapted physical activity quarterly: APAQ