COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Publisher: Informa Healthcare

Journal description

From pathophysiology and cell biology to pharmacology and psychosocial impact, COPD: Journal Of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease publishes a wide range of original research, reviews, case studies, and conference proceedings to promote advances in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and control of lung and airway disease and inflammation - providing a unique forum for the discussion, design, and evaluation of more efficient and effective strategies in patient care

Current impact factor: 2.67

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.673
2013 Impact Factor 2.62
2012 Impact Factor 2.31
2011 Impact Factor 1.794
2010 Impact Factor 2.25

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.94
Cited half-life 4.70
Immediacy index 0.56
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.94
Website Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease website
Other titles COPD (Online), COPD, Journal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
ISSN 1541-2563
OCLC 50389096
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Informa Healthcare

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website or institution website
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Non-commercial
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • NIH funded authors may post articles to PubMed Central for release 12 months after publication
    • Wellcome Trust authors may deposit in Europe PMC after 6 months
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Bronchodilators are commonly used to manage patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy of aclidinium bromide with respect to clinical events, health-related quality of life and symptom scales, pulmonary function, and safety among patients with stable COPD. Methods: A comprehensive search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library databases was undertaken to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared aclidinium with placebo, treatment over at least 12 weeks. Trials were measured using either odds ratios (OR) or mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Seven studies, containing 7001 patients, were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with placebo, aclidinium bromide reduced the incidence of exacerbation-related hospitalizations (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.47 to 0.89) and improved quality of life as measured by a lower total George's Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ] score (MD -2.34; 95% CI -3.18 to -1.51) and attenuated dyspnea symptom as assessed by changes in the Transitional Dyspnea Index [TDI] (MD 0.76; 95% CI 0.43 to 1.10). Similar changes were observed with regard to trough FEV1 and FVC and peak FEV1 and FVC. No significant differences were observed with regard to all-cause mortality, COPD exacerbations, non-fatal serious adverse events or cardiac adverse events. Conclusions: Aclidinium reduced the incidence of exacerbation-related hospitalizations and improved quality of life, COPD symptoms and pulmonary function. In addition, aclidinium did not increase the incidence of non-fatal serious adverse events, cardiac adverse events, or COPD exacerbations and was not associated with increased mortality.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a focus group study in an urban hospital-based primary care teaching clinic serving an indigent and Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) population in New England in order to learn how patients with Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD) perceive their disease, how they experience their medical care, and the barriers they face managing their disease and following medical recommendations. The research team included medical doctors, nurses, a medical anthropologist, a clinical pharmacist, a hospital interpreter, and a systems analyst. Four focus groups were conducted in Spanish and English in April and May 2014. The demographic characteristics of the 25 focus group participants closely reflected the demographics of the total COPD clinic patients. The participants were predominantly female (72%) and Hispanic (72%) and had a median age of 63. The major themes expressed in the focus groups included: problems living with COPD; coping with complexities of comorbid illnesses; challenges of quitting smoking and maintaining cessation; dealing with second-hand smoke; beliefs and myths about quitting smoking; difficulty paying for and obtaining medications; positive experiences obtaining and managing medications; difficulties in using sleep machines at home; expressions of disappointment with the departure of their doctors; and overall satisfaction with the clinic health care providers. The study led to the creation of an action plan that addresses the concerns expressed by the focus study participants. The action plan is spearheaded by a designated bilingual and bicultural nurse and is now in operation.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: We aim to make use of clinical spirometry data in order to identify individual COPD-patients with divergent trajectories of lung function over time. Study design and setting: Hospital-based COPD cohort (N = 607) was followed on average 4.6 years. Each patient had a mean of 8.4 spirometries available. We used a Hierarchical Bayesian Model (HBM) to identify the individuals presenting constant trends in lung function. Results: At a probability level of 95%, one third of the patients (180/607) presented rapidly declining FEV1 (mean -78 ml/year, 95% CI -73 to -83 ml) compared to that in the rest of the patients (mean -26 ml/year, 95% CI -23 to -29 ml, p ≤ 2.2 × 10(-16)). Constant improvement of FEV1 was very rare. The rapid decliners more frequently suffered from exacerbations measured by various outcome markers. Conclusion: Clinical data of unique patients can be utilized to identify diverging trajectories of FEV1 with a high probability. Frequent exacerbations were more prevalent in FEV1-decliners than in the rest of the patients. The result confirmed previously reported association between FEV1 decline and exacerbation rate and further suggested that in clinical practice HBM could improve the identification of high-risk individuals at early stages of the disease.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Endobronchial valve (EBV) therapy has shown improvement in symptoms and lung function despite limited understanding of ideal patient selection. The impact of lobe selection on EBV therapy is unclear. We performed a retrospective analysis to determine the role of lobe selection and identify preprocedure predictors of response to EBV therapy. A total of 492 patients from the USA and Europe were randomized to EBV or control therapy. Spirometry and functional measurements were taken at baseline and 12 months later. At 365 days patients undergoing EBV therapy showed improvement in FEV1 change compared to control regardless of treatment to upper or lower. There was no difference in FEV1 change between the upper and lower lobe treatment groups (55. Criner GJ, Pinto-Plata V, Strange C, Dransfield M, Gotfried M, Leeds W, et al. Biologic lung volume reduction in advanced upper lobe emphysema: Phase 2 results. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2009; 179(9):791–798. doi:10.1164/rccm.200810-1639OC.View all references.99, 7.04, p = 0.75). In addition lobe selection was not identified as a significant modifier of FEV1 change in multiple linear regression analysis. Complete lobe fissure was the only significant predictor of FEV1 change (OR 4.14 (2.29, 7.47)). Our results suggest that lobe selection does not play a major role in EBV therapy response. Complete fissure status preprocedure has the greatest influence on FEV1 improvement. These results have implications on patient selection for current treatment and in future EBV studies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary ventilation may be visualized and measured using hyperpolarized (3)He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) while emphysema and its distribution can be quantified using thoracic computed tomography (CT). Our objective was to phenotype ex-smokers with COPD based on the apical-to-basal distribution of ventilation abnormalities and emphysema to better understand how these phenotypes change regionally as COPD progresses. We evaluated 100 COPD ex-smokers who provided written informed consent and underwent spirometry, CT and (3)He MRI. (3)He MRI ventilation imaging was used to quantify the ventilation defect percent (VDP) for whole-lung and individual lung lobes. Regional VDP was used to generate the apical-lung (AL)-to-basal-lung (BL) difference (ΔVDP); a positive ΔVDP indicated AL-predominant and negative ΔVDP indicated BL-predominant ventilation defects. Emphysema was quantified using the relative-area-of-the-lung ≤-950HU (RA950) of the CT density histogram for whole-lung and individual lung lobes. The AL-to-BL RA950 difference (ΔRA950) was generated with a positive ΔRA950 indicating AL-predominant emphysema and a negative ΔRA950 indicating BL-predominant emphysema. Seventy-two ex-smokers reported BL-predominant MRI ventilation defects and 71 reported AL-predominant CT emphysema. BL-predominant ventilation defects (AL/BL: GOLD I = 18%/82%, GOLD II = 24%/76%) and AL-predominant emphysema (AL/BL: GOLD I = 84%/16%, GOLD II = 72%/28%) were the major phenotypes in mild-moderate COPD. In severe COPD there was a more uniform distribution for ventilation defects (AL/BL: GOLD III = 40%/60%, GOLD IV = 43%/57%) and emphysema (AL/BL: GOLD III = 64%/36%, GOLD IV = 43%/57%). Basal-lung ventilation defects predominated in mild-moderate GOLD grades, and a more homogeneous distribution of ventilation defects was observed in more advanced grade COPD; these differences suggest that over time, regional ventilation abnormalities become more homogenously distributed during disease progression.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Current evidence indicates that the benefits of tele-health may not be uniform across all patients. Therefore, to understand what specific variables influence use of home-based telemanagement in COPD, we conducted this retrospective study. A 6-month home-based telemanagement program (HTP) was offered to 1,074 COPD patients over a 4-year period. Multivarible linear regression analysis was used to identify predictors of HTP use/week (phone calls and specialist consultations) among all variables: clinical (body mass index, co-morbidities, HTP prescription not following an exacerbation, long-term oxygen therapy use, COPD severity, hospital readmissions, exacerbations and death), socio-demographic (sex, age, place of abode), smoking history, arterial blood gases (ABG), and specialist/general practitioner (GP) urgent need. Logistic regression was conducted to predict relapses/hospitalizations risk as well as the disease impact (COPD Assessment Test, CAT) at the end of the program. Presence of relapses (p < 0.001), ABGs (p < 0.001) and GP request (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with higher HTP-use. Smoking history (OR 1.542 [IC 95% 1.069-2.217], p = 0.020), specialist (OR 2.895 [2.144-3.910], p < 0.001) and GP consultations (OR 6.575 [4.521-9.561], p < 0.001) were the only independent risk factors for relapse. No predictor of hospitalization was found. High final CAT score was inversely related to oxygen therapy use (p = 0.001) and HTP prescription (p < 0.001), and positively related to presence of co-morbidities (p = 0.001) and baseline CAT (p < 0.001). This HTP in Lombardy shows that relapsers, people requiring several ABGs and urgent GP visits are the patient subgroup most likely to consume telemanagement services (scheduled and unscheduled). We propose a patient 'identikit' to improve prioritization for HTP prescriptions.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: This is a proof of concept study that aims to establish feasibility and safety of a new strategy that includes an action plan for early treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) with doubling dose of a combination of a long-acting beta2 agonist and an inhaled corticosteroid, and to explore its potential for avoiding the requirement of prednisone and its safety. Thirty-seven COPD outpatients with previous exacerbations were enrolled and followed-up for 12 months. The written action plan included a standing prescription to be used in the event of an AECOPD: Antibiotic, for 5 days (for purulent exacerbations) and doubling a combination of Salmeterol and Fluticasone Propionate for 10 days. The primary outcome was "treatment success" defined as "no need of prednisone within 30 days of the onset." Twenty-seven patients experienced an AECOPD and doubled their combination dose. Among the 27 patients, there were 21 patients (78%) who did not require prednisone, and none of those had cardiovascular events, pneumonia, ER and hospital admissions. We have assessed that an early treatment of AECOPD with doubling the dose of a combination of Salmeterol and Fluticasone Propionate appears to be safe, well-tolerated and adhered to, and results in no requirement of systemic corticosteroid in a large proportion of patients presenting with mild-to-moderate worsening of dyspnea. This trial has the potential to change the approach of treatment of AECOPD and reduce the use of oral corticosteroids.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is refractory to corticosteroids and hence COPD treatment is hindered and insufficient. This study assessed the effects of oral treatment with Montelukast (10 and 30 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (20 mg/kg) for 20 days on COPD model induced by chronic exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six groups of male guinea pigs were studied. Group 1: naïve group, group 2: exposed to saline nebulization. Groups 3, 4, 5, and 6: exposed to 9 nebulizations of LPS (30 μg/ml) for 1 hour, 48 hours apart with or without treatment with Montelukast or dexamethasone. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine (MCh), histopathological study and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as lung tissue analyses were performed 48 hours after the final exposure to LPS (day 20). LPS-induced pulmonary dysfunction was associated with increased neutrophil count, leukotriene (LT) B4, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in BALF. Moreover, there was an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level and a decrease in histone deacetylases(HDAC) activity in the lung tissue. Both Montelukast (10 or 30 mg /kg) and dexamethasone significantly reduced neutrophil count in BALF and inflammatory cells in lung parenchyma as well as TNF-α, and MDA levels. However, dexamethasone was more effective (p < 0.05). Montelukast, at a dose of 30 mg /kg, significantly reduced specific airway resistance after the 9th LPS exposure, attenuated AHR to MCh, decreased LTB4 and increased HDAC activity in comparison to dexamethasone. These results suggest that treatment with Montelukast can be useful in chronic airway inflammatory diseases including COPD poorly responsive to glucocorticoids.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Polymorphisms in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene (CHRNA5/CHRNA3 locus) have been associated with several smoking related traits such as nicotine dependence, cigarette consumption, smoking cessation, lung cancer, and COPD. The aim of this candidate gene study was to study the locus among the Finnish COPD patients and long-term smokers with regard to COPD risk, smoking behavior, cancer, and all-cause mortality. Genotyping of rs1051730, the locus tagging SNP was done in two longitudinal cohorts: Finnish COPD patients (N = 575, 74% men) and long-term smokers, all men (N = 1911). Finnish population sample (N = 1730) was used as controls. The analyses were done using logistic and Cox regression. The main findings were that the minor allele increased the risk of COPD when compared to the Finnish population at large (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.2-1.7, p = 3.2 × 10-5). Homozygosity for the risk allele was associated in both cohorts with all-cause mortality (crude HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-3.8 and 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.5, respectively), with any type of cancer (crude OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.1) among the COPD patients and with the number of pack-years (crude OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) among the male smokers. CHRNA5/CHRNA3 locus tagged by rs1051730, which has been previously associated with several smoking related diseases was now shown to be associated also with increased all-cause mortality among long-term smokers with or without clinical COPD further emphasizing the clinical importance of the finding.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Over the last 20 years smoking has become the most common method of heroin use and increasing numbers of heroin smokers are presenting to local medical services, before the age of 40 years, with severe airway disease. To determine COPD prevalence we recruited 129 subjects from two local community drug services, of whom 107 were heroin smokers. We collected demographic, medical and treatment data, smoking history (including cannabis and opiates) and details of symptoms including MRC dyspnoea. Subjects completed the COPD Assessment Tool and spirometry. Thirty heroin smokers were identified as having COPD resulting in a COPD prevalence of 28%. Mean age was 43 (4)4. Cygan J, Trunsky M, Corbridge T. Inhaled heroin-induced status Asthmaticus: Five cases and a review of the literature. Chest 2000; 117:272–275.View all references years and FEV1 was 2.71 (0.98) L; 70 (23)23. Doshi V, Shenoy S, Ganesh A, Lankala S, Henkle J. Near fatal asthma in an inner city population. Am J Ther 2014; Oct 3. [Epub ahead of print].View all references %predicted. Breathlessness and wheeze were more common in subjects with COPD (p < 0.04 and p < 0.05) but symptoms were common in all heroin smokers. MRC score was higher (3 vs. 2.4; p < 0.04) in those with COPD and health status appeared poorer (CAT 20.4 vs. 15.8; p < 0.07). Only 4 (11%) had previously been diagnosed with COPD and only 16 (53%) received any inhaled medication. Asthma prevalence was also high at 33% and asthmatic subjects had similar symptoms and health status compared with the COPD subjects, and were also significantly undertreated. COPD and asthma are common in current and former heroin smokers. They are often present at a young age and are underdiagnosed and undertreated. Awareness of this issue should be highlighted within drug services and in particular to heroin smokers. Screening this high-risk population with spirometry should be considered.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: In COPD, body composition studies have focused primarily on low BMI. We examined obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) as a risk factor for poor function and longitudinal functional decline. Data from a longitudinal cohort of adults with COPD (n = 1096) and an age- and sex-matched comparison group collected in two in-person visits ∼49 months apart were analyzed. Two measures of functioning were examined: six-minute walk distance (6MWD) and Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Multivariate regression analyses examined relationships of obesity with functioning. Secondary analyses stratified by GOLD classification (GOLD-0/1, GOLD-2, GOLD-3/4). Obesity (53% of COPD cohort) was associated cross-sectionally with 6MWD and SPPB in COPD, and only with 6MWD in the comparison group. Obesity predicted significant functional decline in 6MWD for individuals with COPD (odds ratio (OR) for decline [95% CI] 1.8 [1.1, 2.9]), but not the comparison group. Secondary analyses revealed that the risk of decline was significant only in those with more severe COPD (GOLD 3/4, OR = 2.3 [1.0, 5.4]). Obesity was highly prevalent and was associated with poor function concurrently and with subsequent decline in 6MWD in COPD. Obesity in COPD should be considered a risk not only for more co-morbidities and greater health care use, but also for functional decline.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Mortality of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is on the decline in China. It is not known if this trend occurs across all areas or whether spatiotemporal variations manifest. We used data from the nationally representative China Mortality Surveillance System to calculate annual COPD mortality counts (2006-2012) stratified by 5-year age groups (aged > 20), gender and time for 161 counties and districts (Disease Surveillance Points, or DSP). These counts were linked to annually adjusted denominator populations. Multilevel negative binomial regression with random intercepts and slopes were used to investigate spatiotemporal variation in COPD mortality adjusting for age, gender and area-level risk factors. COPD mortality rate decreased markedly from 105.1 to 73.7 per 100,000 during 2006 to 2012 and varied over two-fold between DSPs across China. Mortality rates were higher in the west compared with the east (Rate ratio (RR) 2.15, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.73, 2.68) and in rural compared with the urban (RR 1.87, 95% CI 1.55, 2.25). Adjustment for age, gender, urban/rural, region, smoking prevalence, indoor air pollution, mean body mass index and socioeconomic circumstances accounted for 67% of the geographical variation. Urban/rural differences in COPD mortality narrowed over time, but the magnitude of the east-west inequality persisted without change. Immediate action via large-scale interventions to enhance the prevention and management of COPD are needed specifically within China's western region in order to tackle this crucial health inequality and leading preventable cause of death.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) affects 12-16 million people in the United States and is the third-leading cause of death. In developed countries, smoking is the greatest risk factor for the development of COPD, but other exposures also contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Several studies suggest, though are not definitive, that outdoor air pollution exposure is linked to the prevalence and incidence of COPD. Among individuals with COPD, outdoor air pollutants are associated with loss of lung function and increased respiratory symptoms. In addition, outdoor air pollutants are also associated with COPD exacerbations and mortality. There is much less evidence for the impact of indoor air on COPD, especially in developed countries in residences without biomass exposure. The limited existing data suggests that indoor particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide concentrations are linked to increased respiratory symptoms among patients with COPD. In addition, with the projected increases in temperature and extreme weather events in the context of climate change there has been increased attention to the effects of heat exposure. Extremes of temperature-both heat and cold-have been associated with increased respiratory morbidity in COPD. Some studies also suggest that temperature may modify the effect of pollution exposure and though results are not conclusive, understanding factors that may modify susceptibility to air pollution in patients with COPD is of utmost importance.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Right ventricular (RV) systolic failure is rare in patients with COPD, but they often develop RV diastolic dysfunction. Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is also common in this population. Nevertheless, data are scarce regarding the effect of diastolic dysfunction on the functional capacity in patients with COPD. We investigated the correlation between echocardiographic parameters of RV and LV diastolic function and the exercise capacity in COPD, by using conventional echocardiographic methods and tissue Doppler imaging. 65 patients with COPD (61 ± 9 years) in stages GOLD II-IV were investigated. Functional capacity was measured with 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Right (RA) and left atrial (LA) area index were measured; collapsibility index inferior vena cava was calculated. Parameters of the mitral and tricuspid inflow (E, A) as well as annular systolic (S), early- (e') and late- (a') diastolic myocardial longitudinal velocities were measured. E/A, E/e' and e'/a' ratios were calculated. 6MWT distance was 330 ± 76 m. LV diastolic dysfunction was found in 48 (74%) patients. LV and RV filling pressures were elevated in 28 (43%) and in 29 (45%) patients, respectively. In the left heart, LA area index showed significant correlation with the functional capacity (r = -0.319; p = 0.011). In stepwise multiple linear regression analysis tricuspid e'/a' (r = 0.611; p = 0.000), collapsibility index (r = 0.505; p = 0.000), RA area index (r = -0.445; p = 0.000) and body surface area (r = 0.314; p = 0.011) were independent predictors of 6MWT distance. Right ventricular diastolic function and filling pressure have strong influence on the functional capacity in patients with COPD.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has a considerable impact on quality of life and well-being of patients. Health state utility value (HSUV) is a recognized measure for health economic appraisals and is extensively used as an indicator for decision-making studies. This study is a systematic review of literature aimed to estimate mean utility value in COPD using meta-analysis and explore degree of heterogeneity in the utility values across a variety of clinical and study characteristic. The literature review covers studies that used EQ-5D to estimate utility value for patient level research in COPD. Studies that reported utility values elicited by EQ-5D in COPD patients were selected for random-effect meta-analysis addressing inter-study heterogeneity and subgroup analyses. Thirty-two studies were included in the general utility meta-analysis. The estimated general utility value was 0.673 (95% CI 0.653 to 0.693). Meta-analyses of COPD stages utility values showed influence of airway obstruction on utility value. The utility values ranged from 0.820 (95% CI 0.767 to 0.872) for stage I to 0.624 (95% CI 0.571 to 0.677) for stage IV. There was substantial heterogeneity in utility values: I(2) = 97.7%. A more accurate measurement of utility values in COPD is needed to refine valid and generalizable scores of HSUV. Given the limited success of the factors studied to reduce heterogeneity, an approach needs to be developed how best to use mean utility values for COPD in health economic evaluation.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · COPD Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease