Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education (Biochem Mol Biol Educ)

Publisher: International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Wiley

Journal description

Title discontinued as of 2002. Formerly known as Biochemical Education

Current impact factor: 0.65

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 0.654
2013 Impact Factor 0.593
2012 Impact Factor 0.702
2011 Impact Factor 0.84
2010 Impact Factor 0.619
2009 Impact Factor 0.292
2008 Impact Factor 0.635
2007 Impact Factor 0.504
2006 Impact Factor 0.368
2005 Impact Factor 0.646
2004 Impact Factor 0.513
2003 Impact Factor 0.637
2002 Impact Factor 0.409
2001 Impact Factor 0.3

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.71
Cited half-life 7.00
Immediacy index 0.03
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.17
Website Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education website
Other titles Biochemistry and molecular biology education (Online), Biochemistry and molecular biology education, BAMBEd
ISSN 1539-3429
OCLC 45409187
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo for scientific, technical and medicine titles
    • 2 years embargo for humanities and social science titles
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • On a non-profit server
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is not available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 6 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • If OnlineOpen is not available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • Reviewed 18/03/14
    • Please see former John Wiley & Sons and Blackwell Publishing policies for articles published prior to February 2007
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Krebs Cycle is a highly taught biochemical pathway that is traditionally difficult to learn. Twenty-seven undergraduate students were randomized to a rote memorization arm or to a mnemonic arm. They were given a pre-test, then shown a lecture corresponding to their assigned method, and then given an immediate Week 0 post-test and a Week 4 post-test. Groups scored comparably low on the pre-test (p = 0.7113). Students in the mnemonic arm performed better on the Week 0 post-test than those using rote (p = 0.0055). By Week 4, there was evidence of knowledge decay, with both arms' having comparably low scores (mnemonic vs. rote, p = 0.3739). The mnemonic assists in rapid acquisition of knowledge but probably has to be reviewed iteratively over time to demonstrate its full potential over rote memorization. A limited number of students from only one school was used. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2016.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes a synergistic two-semester writing sequence for biochemistry courses. In the first semester, students select a putative protein and are tasked with researching their protein largely through bioinformatics resources. In the second semester, students develop original ideas and present them in the form of a research grant proposal. Both projects involve multiple drafts and peer review. The complementarity of the projects increases student exposure to bioinformatics and literature resources, fosters higher-order thinking skills, and develops teamwork and communication skills. Student feedback and responses on perception surveys demonstrated that the students viewed both projects as favorable learning experiences. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
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    ABSTRACT: Benefits of incorporating research experiences into laboratory courses have been well documented, yet examples of research projects designed for the first semester introductory organic chemistry lab course are extremely rare. To address this deficiency, a Carbohydrate-Based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Inhibitor project consisting of a synthetic scheme of four reactions was developed for and implemented in the first semester organic lab. Students carried out the synthetic reactions during the last 6 of 10 total labs in the course, generating carbohydrate-based dimeric target molecules modeled after published dimers with application in HIV therapy. The project was designed to provide a research experience through use of literature procedures for reactions performed, exploration of variation in linker length in the target structure, and synthesis of compounds not previously reported in the scientific literature. Project assessment revealed strong student support, indicating enhanced engagement and interest in the course as a direct result of the use of scientific literature and the applications of the synthesized carbohydrate-based molecules. Regardless of discussed challenges in designing a research project for the first semester lab course, the finding from data analysis that a project implemented in the first semester lab had significantly greater student impact than a second semester project should provide motivation for development of additional research projects for a first semester organic course. © 2015 by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
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    ABSTRACT: Since 2010, second-year undergraduate students of an eight-year training program leading to a Doctor of Medicine degree or Doctor of Philosophy degree in Peking University Health Science Center (PKUHSC) have been required to enter the “Innovative talent training project.” During that time, the students joined a research lab and participated in some original research work. There is a critical educational need to prepare these students for the increasing accessibility of research experience. The redesigned experimental curriculum of biochemistry and molecular biology was developed to fulfill such a requirement, which keeps two original biochemistry experiments (Gel filtration and Enzyme kinetics) and adds a new two-experiment component called “Analysis of anti-tumor drug induced apoptosis.” The additional component, also known as the “project-oriented experiment” or the “comprehensive experiment,” consists of Western blotting and a DNA laddering assay to assess the effects of etoposide (VP16) on the apoptosis signaling pathways. This reformed laboratory teaching system aims to enhance the participating students overall understanding of important biological research techniques and the instrumentation involved, and to foster a better understanding of the research process all within a classroom setting. Student feedback indicated that the updated curriculum helped them improve their operational and self-learning capability, and helped to increase their understanding of theoretical knowledge and actual research processes, which laid the groundwork for their future research work. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
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    ABSTRACT: There are barriers to adoption of research-based teaching methods. Professional development workshops may inform faculty of these methods, but effective adoption often does not follow. In addition, newly-minted research-active faculty are often overwhelmed by the many new responsibilities (grant writing, group management, laboratory setup, teaching) that accompany the position and normally do not have the time to consider novel teaching approaches. This case study documents how over a three-year period, the responsibility for teaching a nontraditional “Introduction to Biochemistry” course in a problem-based learning format was successfully transferred from a senior faculty member nearing retirement (HBW) to a newly-hired research-active assistant professor (CLG). We describe our apprenticeship project involving modeling, scaffolding, fading, and coaching. We suggest that involving faculty in active-learning pedagogy early in their career with mentoring by senior faculty overcomes barriers to adopting these methods. This case describes a specific example from which potentially useful elements can be adopted and adapted wherever biochemistry is taught. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 43(5):345–357, 2015.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
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    ABSTRACT: The activity of mushroom tyrosinase can be measured by monitoring the conversion of phenolic compounds into quinone derivatives using spectrophotometry. This article describes a series of experiments which characterize the functional properties of tyrosinase, the analysis of the resulting data using R to determine the kinetic parameters, and the exploration of the structural properties of tyrosinase-inhibitor complexes. Tyrosinase assay development and subsequent activity measurements, in the presence of varying pH, substrate concentration and inhibitors, offers the opportunity to learn the enzyme characterization skills relevant to a research laboratory setting. Combining the activity studies with an exploration of the nature of the tyrosinase-inhibitor interactions enables a structural understanding of the experimental observations. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
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    ABSTRACT: Here we present the development of a 13 week project-oriented biochemistry laboratory designed to introduce students to foundational biochemical techniques and then enable students to perform original research projects once they have mastered these techniques. In particular, we describe a semester-long laboratory that focuses on a biomedically relevant enzyme-Helicobacter pylori (Hp) urease-the activity of which is absolutely required for the gastric pathogen Hp to colonize the human stomach. Over the course of the semester, students undertake a biochemical purification of Hp urease, assess the success of their purification, and investigate the activity of their purified enzyme. In the final weeks of the semester, students design and implement their own experiments to study Hp urease. This laboratory provides students with an understanding of the importance of biochemistry in human health while empowering them to engage in an active area of research. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: SDS-PAGE and western blotting are two commonly taught protein detection techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory classrooms. A pitfall associated with incorporating these techniques into the laboratory is the significant wait times that do not allow students to obtain timely results. The waiting associated with SDS-PAGE comes from staining and destaining, whereas with western blotting it is the times required for antibody incubations and the numerous wash steps. This laboratory exercise incorporates 2,2,2-trichloroethanol (TCE) into the SDS-PAGE gel allowing for visualization of migrated proteins in a matter of minutes, saving both the time and chemical waste associated with traditional Coomassie staining. Additionally, TCE staining does not affect protein transfer eliminating the requirement for duplicated gels for total protein and western analyses. Protein transfer can be confirmed immediately without the use of Ponceau S staining. Lastly, this western blot procedure has been further shortened by using an HRP-conjugated primary antibody, which eliminates the secondary antibody incubation and washes, and uses a colorimetric detection to allow for visualization by students without the need for specialized equipment. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Undergraduates having their first research experience frequently have little idea of what to expect. Institutions offering summer research experiences attempt to address this issue through programs that introduce students to the process and culture of science. However, didactic approaches frequently bore students who prefer more interactive sessions. We describe a "Pass-the-Problem" case study approach that engages groups of students in useful discussions about the research environment they are entering. The cases presented here include keeping a thorough laboratory notebook, balancing laboratory and personal time demands, anxiety about formal presentations, unexpected federal regulatory inspection, working in a lab with limited funds, being used as a technician rather than a researcher, frustration with failed experiments, effects of promotion and tenure on laboratory atmosphere, the importance of reading the research literature, and questioning a career in science. These cases alert students to different situations they might encounter and stimulate discussion about how to deal with them. © 2015 by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
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    ABSTRACT: Reports from employers of higher education graduates indicate the existence of a considerable gap between the skills required by employers and those possessed by recent graduates. As a first step toward closing this gap, this study aims to determine its origin. Interviews with nine research-active biochemistry professionals were used to identify the most important skills for biochemistry students to succeed in research positions postgraduation. The results of these interviews were used to develop a survey, which was then administered to a larger group of biochemistry faculty and industry professionals. The output of the survey was a list of 52 skills valued by biochemistry professionals and rated by perceived importance. Importantly, the survey results also afford a comparative look at the prioritization of skills by two key populations: the academic faculty training students and the industry professionals hiring them. While there are many areas of agreement between these two populations, the survey also reveals areas were priorities diverge. The discrepancies found here suggest that the skills gap manifest at the point of employment may stem directly from differences in prioritization between the academic and industrial environments. This article aims to provide insight into the needs and requirements of the modern biochemical research environment, and invites debate concerning the preparation students receive in academia. Moreover, the results presented herein point to a need for further exploration of the possible misalignment of these two critical environments for young scientists. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2015. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education