Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society

Publisher: Infusion Nurses Society, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

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Other titles Journal of infusion nursing (Online), Infusion nursing
ISSN 1539-0667
OCLC 48272706
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

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    • 12 months embargo
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    • NIH authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 12 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • Wellcome Trust and HHMI authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 6 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • RCUK authors articles will be released as Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives after 6 months
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins'
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this randomized single-blind study is to compare taste and odor disturbances in patients receiving 0.9% sodium chloride flushes from 2 brands. Seventy-five patients from 6 to 18 years of age received intravenous 0.9% sodium chloride infusions, and 50 healthy volunteers who tasted the 2 brands of 0.9% sodium chloride from prefilled syringes were assessed for taste and/or odor disturbances. Taste or odor disturbances were equally present in patients flushed with MedXL and Becton-Dickinson 0.9% sodium chloride. Disturbances are more frequent when 0.9% sodium chloride is flushed through central venous access devices than through peripheral catheters. No difference between the brands was found when healthy volunteers tasted it orally.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) prolong hospital stays and increase cost, morbidity, and mortality. An intensive care unit (ICU) in a suburban Baltimore hospital reduced CLABSI rates to zero in 2012, by revising central venous access device policies and initiatives, which included a bloodstream infection alert system, bundle compliance monitoring and routine evaluation, and use of positive displacement needleless connectors. The hospital's ICU infection rate decreased from 2.9/1000 central-line days in 2010 to 0.8 by 2011, 0 by 2012, and 0.91 in 2013. The utilization ratio was 0.64 in 2011, 0.60 in 2012, and 0.58 in 2013. CLABSI prevention involves all disciplines and requires staff accountability for patient safety.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: There is still much debate over the optimal fluid to use for resuscitation. Different studies have indicated either crystalloid or colloid is the ideal intravenous solution to administer, based on mortality or various physiological parameters. Older studies found differences between crystalloids and colloids. However, with the evolving science of fluid administration, more recent studies have shown no differences in patient outcomes. This review article will provide an overview of these substances and discuss the advantages, disadvantages, and implications for giving crystalloids and colloids in clinical practice.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: Like many nursing "sacred cows," the practice of keeping a vein open with a small infusion of intravenous solution does not have clear origins or robust evidence. A survey of Canadian nurses was conducted to determine current practices. More than 50% of respondents reported regularly using a keep-vein-open (KVO) rate between doses of intermittent medication. Frequently, the rate was not specified by the prescriber; in this case, nurses preferred 21 to 30 mL/h. Given the absence of evidence and the frequent use, it is important to ensure that KVO is used properly in the context of a medical prescription or an organizational protocol.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: In concert with an evolution toward an increased awareness of the need to tightly manage temperature, the methods used to monitor and manipulate temperature have evolved from mercury-filled glass thermometers, alcohol baths, and ice packs into a high technology-driven multidisciplinary activity. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of the historical development of temperature management and the primary tenets of each of the 3 phases (induction, maintenance, and rewarming), which are now recognized as crucial steps to ensure the safe practice of therapeutic temperature management.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: More than 90% of hospitalized patients require peripheral intravenous (IV) access for the delivery of fluids, nutrition, or medication. Peripheral IV site complications, such as infiltration and phlebitis, account for the greatest risk to most patients receiving infusion therapy. These complications may result in substantial acute or chronic injury, which may be further exacerbated if the affected individual is a child. Evidence suggests that the implementation of bedside-nurse training and more frequent assessment will reduce the risk for peripheral IV site complications. This project evaluates the implementation of these interventions on a pediatric acute care unit.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: When deciding which vascular access devices (VADs) are appropriate for patients in newborn intensive care units (NICUs), clinical providers may have difficulty reaching consensus because of a lack of evidence-based recommendations. The aim of this literature review is to evaluate current research and practice pertaining to midline catheter (MC) use in NICU patients. Discussion of the literature review includes information pertaining to the historical perspective of MC use, devices currently in use, common sites for placement, average dwell times, associated costs, and acceptable fluids and medications for infusion through MCs. Conclusive findings suggest that MCs are not an appropriate VAD for NICU patients because of insufficient high-level evidence demonstrating safety and efficacy. Randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate current MC practice in the NICU and the rates of infection and extravasation associated with their use.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of massage of acupoints on pain and anxiety caused by venipuncture. In this double-blind clinical trial, 187 patients who were admitted to a hospital in Khorramabad, Iran, were selected and randomly divided into 3 groups: acupressure, placebo, and control. Blood samples were obtained twice from each patient in the 3 groups: once by the routine method from the left arm and once by performing interventions from the right arm. Results showed significant differences in pain scores (P = .004) between the 3 groups after the intervention only. No significant differences between the 3 groups were found after the intervention with regard to pulse rate, systolic blood pressure, or diastolic blood pressure (P > .05). The application of acupressure at the right acupoints may relieve pain caused by venipuncture. Although further studies are needed to confirm the findings of this study, it is recommended that nurses use this safe method to increase quality of nursing care and patient satisfaction.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: The awareness of pregnancy-related physiologic changes and complications is critical for the appropriate assessment and management of pregnant patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. The overlapping features of physiologic and pathological changes, selected autoantibodies, and the use of potentially teratogenic medications can complicate their management during pregnancy. While pregnancy in lupus patients presents an additional risk to an already complex situation, in patients with no disease activity, the risk of a future pregnancy-related complication is relatively low. Anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies increase the risk of neonatal lupus erythematosus, eg, photosensitive rash and irreversible congenital heart block. Antiphospholipid antibodies increase the risk of pregnancy morbidity, eg, fetal loss and early preeclampsia. Pregnancy usually has a positive effect on rheumatoid arthritis; however, a disease flare is common during the postpartum period. Both the rheumatologist and the obstetrician should partner throughout the pregnancy to manage patients for successful outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: A prospective, randomized controlled trial compared the success of peripheral venipuncture in pediatric patients using vascular ultrasound and standard landmark methods and the occurrence of infiltration and phlebitis. The sample was composed of 382 venipunctures; 188 (49.2%) were performed with vascular ultrasound, and 194 (50.8%) were performed using the standard landmark method. No significant difference (P = .059) was found between either method in the success of peripheral venipuncture. A higher frequency of infiltration was found (P = .025) in the vascular ultrasound group.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic anemia develops over a course of weeks to months and is usually mild to moderate in nature. It is important to understand the etiology of the reduced number of circulating red blood cells to treat the anemia appropriately. Diagnosis is dependent on patient history and laboratory findings, such as complete blood counts, iron studies, a peripheral smear, and occasionally, a bone marrow biopsy. Treatment modalities frequently administered by infusion therapy nurses include treatment of the underlying chronic disease, replacement of deficiencies (iron, vitamin B12, folate, or erythropoietin), or transfusion of red blood cells. Infusion therapy nurses play a vital role in the assessment and delivery of medication therapy to patients with chronic anemia.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: With the growing complexity of multiple sclerosis (MS) care, nursing professionals have increasing responsibility in managing clinical disease and treatment. Nursing professionals and other health care providers play important roles in educating patients about disease-modifying therapy options, the course of therapy, and managing potential adverse effects. A panel of nursing and MS experts was convened and used a modified Delphi method to reach consensus on best-practice recommendations for alemtuzumab infusion in MS patients. This valuable clinical resource provides a practical guide for clinicians to optimize patient education and implement strategies for infusion-associated reaction prophylaxis and management when administering alemtuzumab.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
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    ABSTRACT: Infusion nursing is a unique hybrid of inpatient and ambulatory nursing. The subspecialty of nurses cares for patients requiring treatment over long periods, including cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and patients who require short bursts of treatment, such as those with multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. Infusion nurses are exposed to many of the common root causes of moral distress in their practice, similar to nurses caring for terminally ill or critically ill patients. The specific aims of this article are to (1) define moral distress, moral residue, and the crescendo effect; (2) describe ethical stressors that can be confused with moral distress; (3) review the effects of moral distress on different health care providers; and (4) provide strategies to manage moral distress in the workplace using a case example.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of infusion nursing: the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society