Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP (J Dev Behav Pediatr)

Publisher: Society for Behavioral Pediatrics (U.S.), Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

Current impact factor: 2.13

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.129
2013 Impact Factor 2.118
2012 Impact Factor 1.75
2011 Impact Factor 2.135
2010 Impact Factor 2.205
2009 Impact Factor 2.265
2008 Impact Factor 2.487
2007 Impact Factor 2.097
2006 Impact Factor 2.17
2005 Impact Factor 1.943
2004 Impact Factor 1.69
2003 Impact Factor 1.699
2002 Impact Factor 1.608
2001 Impact Factor 1.367
2000 Impact Factor 1.041
1999 Impact Factor 1.244
1998 Impact Factor 0.885
1997 Impact Factor 0.786
1996 Impact Factor 0.96
1995 Impact Factor 0.858
1994 Impact Factor 0.759
1993 Impact Factor 0.741
1992 Impact Factor 0.922

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.52
Cited half-life 8.30
Immediacy index 0.61
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.88
Other titles Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics, Journal of developmental & behavioral pediatrics, JDBP
ISSN 1536-7312
OCLC 5780657
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • Pre-print must be removed upon acceptance for publication
    • Post-print may be deposited in personal website or institutional repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must include statement that it is not the final published version
    • Published source must be acknowledged with full citation
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Must link to publisher version
    • NIH authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 12 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • Wellcome Trust and HHMI authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 6 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • Publisher last reviewed on 19/03/2015
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Child maltreatment is a worldwide phenomenon with far-reaching negative consequences, and physical abuse is its most visible and widely reported form of maltreatment. There is a fine line between nonabusive physical punishment and physical child abuse, and where this line is drawn is often influenced by prevailing cultural practices and child-rearing beliefs. This article focus on Singapore-a modern Asian society that remains rooted in traditional attitudes and practices-as a case study in exploring the boundaries. In particular, the local practice of caning (hitting with a rattan cane) as a disciplinary measure for children, the ambiguity of the law on the issue of physical abuse, and the influence of judicial caning on the acceptability of this common practice are examined. Finally, the possible means of safeguarding children and discouraging the use of physical punishment in the home are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: T he biennial release of the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in 8-year-old children by the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) network of the Centers for Disease Control1 plays a critical public health role by estimating the number of children with ASD in the United States. Prevalence reports are used by scientists to compare findings in samples ascertained from the community, by funding agencies such as the National Institutes of Health to prioritize funding decisions, by policy makers to address the needs of children with ASD, and by many others in the community. The article by Christensen in the current issue of JDBP2 used the same methods in a subset of the ADDM sites to determine the prevalence of ASD in 4-year-old children. The key finding is that within the specified catchment areas, the prevalence of ASD in 4-year-old children is 30% lower than the prevalence of 8-year-old children. This finding points to a gap between current knowledge of early manifestations of ASD and our ability to use such knowledge to detect and record ASD symptoms in preschoolers. When considering differences in prevalence at age 4 and age 8 in the context of record-review surveillance methodology, 2 distinct questions must be considered: (1) is all ASD detectable at early ages, meaning are symptoms at clinically significant levels at the time of assessment? (2) Do records adequately capture all cases that have detectable ASD symptoms? Regarding the first question about when ASD symptoms reach clinically significant levels, it is evident from
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Early identification of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) facilitates timely access to intervention services. Yet, few population-based data exist on ASD identification among preschool-aged children. The authors aimed to describe ASD prevalence and characteristics among 4-year-old children in 5 of 11 sites participating in the 2010 Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network. Method: Children with ASD were identified through screening of health and education records for ASD indicators, data abstraction and compilation for each child, and clinician review of records. ASD prevalence estimates, ages at first evaluation and ASD diagnosis, cognitive test scores, and demographics were compared for 4-year-old children and 8-year-old children living in the same areas. Results: Among 58,467 children in these 5 sites, 4-year-old ASD prevalence was 13.4 per 1000, which was 30% lower than 8-year-old ASD prevalence. Prevalence of ASD without cognitive impairment was 40% lower among 4-year-olds compared with 8-year-olds, but prevalence of ASD with cognitive impairment was 20% higher among 4-year-olds compared with 8-year-olds. Among 4-year-olds with ASD, female and non-Hispanic white children were more likely to receive their first comprehensive evaluation by age 36 months compared with male and non-Hispanic black children, respectively. Among children diagnosed with ASD by age 48 months, median age at first comprehensive evaluation was 27 months for 4-year-olds compared with 32 months for 8-year-olds. Conclusion: Population-based ASD surveillance among 4-year-old children provides valuable information about the early identification of children with ASD and suggests progression toward lowering the age of first ASD evaluation within participating Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring communities.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The authors aim was to examine associations of breastfeeding duration and exclusivity in infancy with executive function, behavior, and social-emotional development in mid-childhood. Methods: The authors studied 1037 participants in Project Viva, a prebirth cohort that enrolled pregnant mothers from 1999 to 2002 and followed children for 7 to 10 years. Main exposures were: (1) duration of any breastfeeding in the first 12 months and (2) duration of exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months. Main outcomes were child executive function, behavior, and social-emotional development, assessed by (1) the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) and (2) the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), completed independently by parents and teachers. Higher scores indicate greater problems. Results: In linear regression models adjusted for sociodemographics, maternal intelligence, home environment, early child care, and maternal depression, longer breastfeeding duration was not associated with substantially better executive function, behavior, or social-emotional development. For example, for each additional month of any breastfeeding, the BRIEF Global Executive Composite score (parent) was 0.10 points higher (95% confidence interval, -0.01 to 0.22) and the SDQ total difficulties score was 0.06 points higher (-0.01, 0.12). Breastfeeding duration was also not associated with BRIEF or SDQ subscales, nor was exclusive breastfeeding duration associated with any of the outcomes analyzed. Conclusion: Despite beneficial effects on general intelligence, longer duration of any breastfeeding or of exclusive breastfeeding was not associated with better executive function, behavior, or social-emotional development in mid-childhood.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To (1) identify and summarize procedures of Foxx and Azrin's classic toilet training protocol that continue to be used in training typically developing children and (2) adapt recent findings with the original Foxx and Azrin procedures to inform practical suggestions for the rapid toilet training of typically developing children in the primary care setting. Method: Literature searches of PsychINFO and MEDLINE databases used the search terms "(toilet* OR potty* AND train*)." Selection criteria were only peer-reviewed experimental articles that evaluated intensive toilet training with typically developing children. Exclusion criteria were (1) nonpeer reviewed research, (2) studies addressing encopresis and/or enuresis, (3) studies excluding typically developing children, and (4) studies evaluating toilet training during infancy. Results: In addition to the study of Foxx and Azrin, only 4 publications met the above criteria. Toilet training procedures from each article were reviewed to determine which toilet training methods were similar to components described by Foxx and Azrin. Common training elements include increasing the frequency of learning opportunities through fluid loading and having differential consequences for being dry versus being wet and for voiding in the toilet versus elsewhere. Conclusion: There is little research on intensive toilet training of typically developing children. Practice sits and positive reinforcement for voids in the toilet are commonplace, consistent with the Foxx and Azrin protocol, whereas positive practice as a corrective procedure for wetting accidents often is omitted. Fluid loading and differential consequences for being dry versus being wet and for voiding in the toilet also are suggested procedures, consistent with the Foxx and Azrin protocol.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Youth attempting to lose weight may engage in a variety of weight control behaviors (WCBs), some of which are viewed as healthy WCBs (HWCBs), whereas others are viewed as unhealthy WCBs (UWCBs). This study sought to examine youth perceptions of which WCBs are safe versus unsafe ways to lose weight. Furthermore, youth safety perceptions of WCBs and body mass index (BMI) z-scores were examined in relation to how often youth engage in these WCBs. Method: Participants were 219 youth (aged 10-17 years) attending a primary care clinic appointment. Participants completed questionnaires about the frequency of their own WCB use and whether they perceived each WCB as a safe way to lose weight. Results: Results revealed differences in safety perceptions across weight status groups for certain HWCBs and UWCBs. Youth perception of WCBs as safe ways to lose weight was associated with more frequent engagement in WCBs. Furthermore, an interaction between youth safety perception of HWCBs and youth BMI z-scores was related to greater engagement in HWCBs, such that the relationship between safety perception and engagement was only significant for youth who are overweight/obese. The moderation model explained 36.95% of the variance in engagement in HWCBs. The moderation model was also significant for UWCBs (r = .35). Conclusion: This study identifies youth safety perception of WCBs as a mechanism that may lead to increased youth engagement in WCBs. Health care providers should educate both youth and family members about safe versus unsafe WCBs.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Preterm birth is associated with lower cognitive functioning. One potential pathway is postnatal parental depression. The authors assessed depressive symptoms in mothers and fathers after preterm birth, and identified the impacts of both prematurity and parental depressive symptoms on children's early cognitive function. Method: Data were from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (n = 5350). Depressive symptoms at 9 months were assessed by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD) and children's cognitive function at 24 months by the Bayley Short Form, Research Edition. Weighted generalized estimating equation models examined the extent to which preterm birth, and mothers' and fathers' postnatal depressive symptoms impacted children's cognitive function at 24 months, and whether the association between preterm birth and 24-month cognitive function was mediated by parental depressive symptoms. Results: At 9 months, fathers of very preterm (<32 weeks gestation) and moderate/late preterm (32-37 weeks gestation) infants had higher CESD scores than fathers of term-born (≥37 weeks gestation) infants (p value = .02); preterm birth was not associated with maternal depressive symptoms. In multivariable analyses, preterm birth was associated with lower cognitive function at 24 months; this association was unaffected by adjustment for parental depressive symptoms. Fathers', but not mothers', postnatal depressive symptoms predicted lower cognitive function in the fully adjusted model (β = -0.11, 95% confidence interval, -0.18 to -0.03). Conclusion: Fathers of preterm infants have more postnatal depressive symptomology than fathers of term-born infants. Fathers' depressive symptoms also negatively impact children's early cognitive function. The national findings support early identification and treatment of fathers of preterm infants with depressive symptoms.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To compare cognitive, language, and motor skills and results of neurological examination in 2-year-old children born to mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus treated with metformin with those treated with insulin. Method: The children of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus randomized to metformin (n = 75) or insulin (n = 71) treatment during pregnancy were examined by standardized developmental and neurological measures; the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley-III) and the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination. Results: There were no significant differences between the metformin and insulin groups in the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley-III) test of cognitive scale (p = .12), receptive communication (p = .14) or expressive communication (p = .75), fine motor scale (p = .10) or gross motor scale (p = .13), or the global scores of Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination (p = .14). None of the children had a clinically significant developmental problem. However, compared with age-adjusted norms, a trend for weaker language performance was observed in both study groups. Conclusion: No differences in neurodevelopmental outcome were seen in 2-year-old children born to mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) treated with insulin or metformin during pregnancy. The results suggest that children born to mothers with GDM and exposed to metformin in utero do not systematically need extensive formal neurodevelopmental assessment in early childhood.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To derive latent classes (longitudinal “phenotypes”) of frequency of bedwetting from 4 to 9 years and to examine their association with developmental delay, parental history of bedwetting, length of gestation and birth weight. Method: The authors used data from 8,769 children from the UK Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children cohort. Mothers provided repeated reports on their child's frequency of bedwetting from 4 to 9 years. The authors used longitudinal latent class analysis to derive latent classes of bedwetting and examined their association with sex, developmental level at 18 months, parental history of wetting, birth weight, and gestational length. Results: The authors identified 5 latent classes: (1) “normative”—low probability of bedwetting; (2) “infrequent delayed”—delayed attainment of nighttime bladder control with bedwetting <twice a week; (3) “frequent delayed”—delayed attainment of nighttime bladder control with bedwetting ≥ twice a week; (4) “infrequent persistent”—persistent bedwetting < twice a week; and (5) “frequent persistent”—persistent bedwetting ≥ twice a week. Male gender (odds ratio = 3.20 [95% confidence interval = 2.36–4.34]), developmental delay, for example, delayed social skills (1.33 [1.11–1.58]), and maternal history of wetting (3.91 [2.60–5.88]) were associated with an increase in the odds of bedwetting at 4 to 9 years. There was little evidence that low birth weight and shorter gestation period were associated with bedwetting. Conclusion: The authors described patterns of development of nighttime bladder control and found evidence for factors that predict continuation of bedwetting at school age. Increased knowledge of risk factors for bedwetting is needed to identify children at risk of future problems attaining and maintaining continence.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: This study compared child weight status, social skills, body dissatisfaction, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL), as well as parent distress and family functioning in youth who are overweight or obese (OV/OB) with versus without clinical anxiety symptoms. Method: Participants included 199 children 7 to 12 years of age (mean age = 9.88 years) who were OV/OB, and their parents. Children completed social skills, body dissatisfaction, and HRQOL questionnaires. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and child HRQOL, parent distress, family functioning, and demographic questionnaires. Children were placed in 2 groups based on CBCL anxiety problems scale scores: the OV/OB + clinical anxiety group included children with T scores ≥65 (n = 23) and children with T scores ≤59 comprised the OV/OB group (n = 176). Results: After controlling for covariates, children in the OV/OB + clinical anxiety group reported more body dissatisfaction (F[1,198] = 5.26, p = .023, partial η = .027) and lower total HRQOL (F[1,198] = 8.12, p = .005, η = .041) and had parents who reported higher psychological distress (F[1,198] = 5.48, p = .020, η = .028) and lower child total HRQOL (F[1,198] = 28.23, p < .001, η = .128) compared with children in the OV/OB group. Group differences were not significant for child weight status, social skills, or family functioning. Conclusion: Clinically significant anxiety among children who are OV/OB is associated with increased body dissatisfaction and parent psychological distress, as well as decreased HRQOL. Findings have implications for the assessment and treatment of anxiety symptoms in pediatric obesity.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Case: Emily is a 4 and half-year-old girl whose foster mother is concerned about her odd eating behaviors. Emily has been with her foster mother for 1 year after exposure to domestic violence. Emily's habit of eating nonfood items led to her foster mother providing "100% supervision." Emily constantly picks up, smells, and tastes nonfood items, particularly rocks and things made of metal. She "explores everything with her tongue." Emily scoops dirt and gravel from sidewalk crevices into her mouth. Although toileting, she catches and licks urine in her hand and searches for stool to put in her mouth. With redirection, Emily stopped putting feces into her mouth, but after spending time with her biological family, this behavior recurred.Emily does not like to eat foods that are hard or require chewing. She does not choke or gag on solid foods or liquids. She likes foods that are sweet. She refuses to eat vegetables and foods with certain textures. Emily pulls food apart with her hands before putting it in her mouth.Emily has global developmental delay, cerebral palsy, contractures in her legs, and strabismus. A medical workup resulted in a diagnosis of trisomy 4p and monosomy 9p. Emily works with a physical therapist and occupational therapist; she attends preschool in a special day class. She is an alert, playful, and socially engaging girl who walks with an abnormal gait, speaks in short sentences, and follows simple directions.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Investigate effectiveness of an online Counselor-Assisted Problem-Solving (CAPS) intervention on family functioning after traumatic brain injury. Methods: Participants were randomized to CAPS (n = 65) or Internet resource comparison (IRC; n = 67). CAPS is a counselor-assisted web-based program. IRC was given access to online resources. Outcomes were examined at 6, 12, and 18 months after baseline. Injury severity, age, and socioeconomic status were examined as moderators. Results: A main effect of time was noted for teen-reported conflict and parent-reported problem solving. CAPS had decreased parent-reported conflict and a reduction in parental effective communication. Effects were specific to subsets of the sample. Conclusion: CAPS, a family-based problem-solving intervention designed to address problem behaviors, had modest effects on some aspects of family functioning compared with IRC. Effects were generally limited to subsets of the families and were not evident across all follow-up assessments.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics: JDBP