New England Journal of Medicine (New Engl J Med)

Publisher: Massachusetts Medical Society, Massachusetts Medical Society

Journal description

One of the world's leading medical journals, the NEJM publishes original research and interpretive articles in major aspects of medicine: its science, its art and practice, and its position in today's society. Each week, The Journal presents major, previously unpublished research results, clinical findings, updates and opinions.

Current impact factor: 55.87

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 55.873
2013 Impact Factor 54.42
2012 Impact Factor 51.658
2011 Impact Factor 53.298
2010 Impact Factor 53.484
2009 Impact Factor 47.05
2008 Impact Factor 50.017
2007 Impact Factor 52.589
2006 Impact Factor 51.296
2005 Impact Factor 44.016
2004 Impact Factor 38.57
2003 Impact Factor 34.833
2002 Impact Factor 31.736
2001 Impact Factor 29.065
2000 Impact Factor 29.512
1999 Impact Factor 28.857
1998 Impact Factor 28.66
1997 Impact Factor 27.766
1996 Impact Factor 24.834
1995 Impact Factor 22.412
1994 Impact Factor 22.673
1993 Impact Factor 23.762
1992 Impact Factor 24.455

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 54.39
Cited half-life 8.40
Immediacy index 13.84
Eigenfactor 0.68
Article influence 24.26
Website New England Journal of Medicine website
Other titles New England journal of medicine (Online), New England journal of medicine, NEJM
ISSN 1533-4406
OCLC 34945333
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Massachusetts Medical Society

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Publisher's version/PDF must be used
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • On non-profit open access repository, including institutional repository
    • NIH and Wellcome Trust authors will have their published article deposited in PubMed Central on their behalf after 6 months embargo
    • Publisher last reviewed on 09/07/2015
  • Classification
    white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Skinner et al. (Oct. 1 issue)(1) describe the increased prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors among overweight or obese children who were included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999 through 2012. The investigators excluded children with normal weight from the study analysis. Research has suggested the presence of a metabolically obese, normal-weight phenotype even in childhood.(2) It is important to look at additional risk factors, such as abdominal obesity, family history, birth weight, and ethnic predisposition, in order to comprehensively assess the future cardiovascular risk among children.(3) The data provided in the article . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: In reporting on the effect of prostate-cancer screening, Welch et al. (Oct. 29 issue)(1) suggest that since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, the incidence of metastatic disease has decreased by 50%. However, randomized clinical trials examining this practice have shown little survival benefit.(2),(3) In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended against PSA-based prostate-cancer screening,(4) and that recommendation has been adopted by primary care governing bodies.(5) We evaluated the presentation and prostate-cancer diagnosis of men referred for an elevated PSA level over a 3-year period coinciding with the USPSTF recommendations. The number . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This report shows evidence for nosocomial transmission of H7N9 influenza from a patient to two physicians who provided care.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Zika virus has been sweeping through South and Central America, with more than a million suspected cases during the past few months, along with a substantial increase in reporting of infants born with microcephaly.(1),(2) Thus far, the two outbreaks have largely been epidemiologically associated in time and geography. However, Mlakar and colleagues(3) now report in the Journal molecular genetic and electron-microscopic data from a case that helps to strengthen the biologic association. This group cared for a pregnant European woman in whom a syndrome compatible with Zika virus infection developed at 13 weeks of gestation while she was working . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A widespread epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection was reported in 2015 in South and Central America and the Caribbean. A major concern associated with this infection is the apparent increased incidence of microcephaly in fetuses born to mothers infected with ZIKV. In this report, we describe the case of an expectant mother who had a febrile illness with rash at the end of the first trimester of pregnancy while she was living in Brazil. Ultrasonography performed at 29 weeks of gestation revealed microcephaly with calcifications in the fetal brain and placenta. After the mother requested termination of the pregnancy, a fetal autopsy was performed. Micrencephaly (an abnormally small brain) was observed, with almost complete agyria, hydrocephalus, and multifocal dystrophic calcifications in the cortex and subcortical white matter, with associated cortical displacement and mild focal inflammation. ZIKV was found in the fetal brain tissue on reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay, with consistent findings on electron microscopy. The complete genome of ZIKV was recovered from the fetal brain.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: The LEADLESS II study (Sept. 17 issue)(1) reports the safety and efficacy of a leadless, self-contained, percutaneously implanted pacemaker that is an innovative example of miniaturization. The effect of cremation on this pacemaker was not studied. Given the rising number of cremations being performed worldwide, the potential hazard associated with the cremation of persons who have this pacemaker is a concern.(2),(3) The battery in the leadless pacemaker is a lithium carbon monofluoride-polycarbon fluoride device, which has a high density of energy.(4) It is hypothesized that the greater the energy density of a battery, the greater the . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background Cryptococcal meningitis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes more than 600,000 deaths each year worldwide. Treatment has changed little in 20 years, and there are no imminent new anticryptococcal agents. The use of adjuvant glucocorticoids reduces mortality among patients with other forms of meningitis in some populations, but their use is untested in patients with cryptococcal meningitis. Methods In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we recruited adult patients with HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Laos, Uganda, and Malawi. All the patients received either dexamethasone or placebo for 6 weeks, along with combination antifungal therapy with amphotericin B and fluconazole. Results The trial was stopped for safety reasons after the enrollment of 451 patients. Mortality was 47% in the dexamethasone group and 41% in the placebo group by 10 weeks (hazard ratio in the dexamethasone group, 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 1.47; P=0.45) and 57% and 49%, respectively, by 6 months (hazard ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.53; P=0.20). The percentage of patients with disability at 10 weeks was higher in the dexamethasone group than in the placebo group, with 13% versus 25% having a prespecified good outcome (odds ratio, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.69; P<0.001). Clinical adverse events were more common in the dexamethasone group than in the placebo group (667 vs. 494 events, P=0.01), with more patients in the dexamethasone group having grade 3 or 4 infection (48 vs. 25 patients, P=0.003), renal events (22 vs. 7, P=0.004), and cardiac events (8 vs. 0, P=0.004). Fungal clearance in cerebrospinal fluid was slower in the dexamethasone group. Results were consistent across Asian and African sites. Conclusions Dexamethasone did not reduce mortality among patients with HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis and was associated with more adverse events and disability than was placebo. (Funded by the United Kingdom Department for International Development and others through the Joint Global Health Trials program; Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN59144167 .).
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Acceleration of outcomes measurement can unlock the potential of value-based health care for driving improvement. It requires a commitment to measuring a minimum sufficient set of outcomes for every major medical condition.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Because oral polio vaccine has been associated with cases of paralysis, it is essential to discontinue its use after polio eradication has been certified. The first step is a shift from a trivalent OPV to a bivalent one, which requires a multipronged global strategy.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • Article: Case 4-2016
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    ABSTRACT: A 58-year-old woman presented during the summer with fever, neck swelling, and an ulcerated lesion on the forehead. Imaging of the neck showed enlarged, centrally hypodense lymph nodes with infiltration of the surrounding fat. Tests were performed, and a diagnosis was made.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: In reporting on the effect of prostate-cancer screening, Welch et al. (Oct. 29 issue)(1) suggest that since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, the incidence of metastatic disease has decreased by 50%. However, randomized clinical trials examining this practice have shown little survival benefit.(2),(3) In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended against PSA-based prostate-cancer screening,(4) and that recommendation has been adopted by primary care governing bodies.(5) We evaluated the presentation and prostate-cancer diagnosis of men referred for an elevated PSA level over a 3-year period coinciding with the USPSTF recommendations. The number . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background The prevalence of dementia is expected to soar as the average life expectancy increases, but recent estimates suggest that the age-specific incidence of dementia is declining in high-income countries. Temporal trends are best derived through continuous monitoring of a population over a long period with the use of consistent diagnostic criteria. We describe temporal trends in the incidence of dementia over three decades among participants in the Framingham Heart Study. Methods Participants in the Framingham Heart Study have been under surveillance for incident dementia since 1975. In this analysis, which included 5205 persons 60 years of age or older, we used Cox proportional-hazards models adjusted for age and sex to determine the 5-year incidence of dementia during each of four epochs. We also explored the interactions between epoch and age, sex, apolipoprotein E ε4 status, and educational level, and we examined the effects of these interactions, as well as the effects of vascular risk factors and cardiovascular disease, on temporal trends. Results The 5-year age- and sex-adjusted cumulative hazard rates for dementia were 3.6 per 100 persons during the first epoch (late 1970s and early 1980s), 2.8 per 100 persons during the second epoch (late 1980s and early 1990s), 2.2 per 100 persons during the third epoch (late 1990s and early 2000s), and 2.0 per 100 persons during the fourth epoch (late 2000s and early 2010s). Relative to the incidence during the first epoch, the incidence declined by 22%, 38%, and 44% during the second, third, and fourth epochs, respectively. This risk reduction was observed only among persons who had at least a high school diploma (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.67 to 0.88). The prevalence of most vascular risk factors (except obesity and diabetes) and the risk of dementia associated with stroke, atrial fibrillation, or heart failure have decreased over time, but none of these trends completely explain the decrease in the incidence of dementia. Conclusions Among participants in the Framingham Heart Study, the incidence of dementia has declined over the course of three decades. The factors contributing to this decline have not been completely identified. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: The LEADLESS II study (Sept. 17 issue)(1) reports the safety and efficacy of a leadless, self-contained, percutaneously implanted pacemaker that is an innovative example of miniaturization. The effect of cremation on this pacemaker was not studied. Given the rising number of cremations being performed worldwide, the potential hazard associated with the cremation of persons who have this pacemaker is a concern.(2),(3) The battery in the leadless pacemaker is a lithium carbon monofluoride-polycarbon fluoride device, which has a high density of energy.(4) It is hypothesized that the greater the energy density of a battery, the greater the . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Skinner et al. (Oct. 1 issue)(1) describe the increased prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors among overweight or obese children who were included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999 through 2012. The investigators excluded children with normal weight from the study analysis. Research has suggested the presence of a metabolically obese, normal-weight phenotype even in childhood.(2) It is important to look at additional risk factors, such as abdominal obesity, family history, birth weight, and ethnic predisposition, in order to comprehensively assess the future cardiovascular risk among children.(3) The data provided in the article . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Antigen-driven selection has been implicated in the pathogenesis of monoclonal gammopathies. Patients with Gaucher's disease have an increased risk of monoclonal gammopathies. Here we show that the clonal immunoglobulin in patients with Gaucher's disease and in mouse models of Gaucher's disease-associated gammopathy is reactive against lyso-glucosylceramide (LGL1), which is markedly elevated in these patients and mice. Clonal immunoglobulin in 33% of sporadic human monoclonal gammopathies is also specific for the lysolipids LGL1 and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). Substrate reduction ameliorates Gaucher's disease-associated gammopathy in mice. Thus, long-term immune activation by lysolipids may underlie both Gaucher's disease-associated gammopathies and some sporadic monoclonal gammopathies.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: The potential decline of dementia, seen in light of the rise and fall of other major diseases, raises a tantalizing prospect: Can we control our burden of disease? The history of the debate on CAD decline carries important lessons for emerging reports of dementia's decline.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), a rare thrombotic microangiopathy, is defined by a mechanical hemolytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, and visceral ischemia due to systemic platelet-rich microthrombi. Specifically in TTP microthrombi, von Willebrand factor, not fibrinogen, is the protein that binds to platelets.(1) Von Willebrand factor is a multimeric glycoprotein that is crucial for physiologic platelet adhesion and aggregation at high shear rates of blood flow, and the largest von Willebrand factor multimers are the most adhesive. The hemostatic power of von Willebrand factor is regulated by a specific cleaving metalloprotease named ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 repeats, . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: In 2011, football quarterback Peyton Manning went on the road to seek out stem-cell "treatment" for his neck. He wasn't alone: many high-profile athletes and desperate (but less famous) patients left the United States seeking interventions available in countries with less rigorous regulation. They didn't necessarily know what kind of cells they were getting, whether there was any evidence the intervention worked, or whether anyone understood the risks they were taking. So why did they do it? Part of the answer may lie in the Latin phrase argumentum ad novitatem, the appeal to the new. A powerful force in . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: The dangers of lead exposure have been recognized for millennia. In the first century a.d., Dioscorides observed in his De Materia Medica that "lead makes the mind give way." The first industrial hygiene act passed in the colonies, in 1723, prohibited the use of lead in the apparatus used to distill rum, because "the strong liquors and spirits that are distilld through leaden heads or pipes are judged on good grounds to be unwholsom and hurtful." More recently, large amounts of lead were used to boost the octane rating of gasoline and improve the performance of paint. One would be . . .
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · New England Journal of Medicine