The American journal of emergency medicine (Am J Emerg Med)

Publisher: WB Saunders

Journal description

A distinctive blend of practicality and scholarliness makes the American Journal of Emergency Medicine the best source of information on emergency medical care. Covering all activities concerned with emergency medicine, it is the journal to turn to for information to help increase the ability to understand, recognize and treat emergency conditions. Issues contain clinical articles, case reports, review articles, editorials, international notes, book reviews and more.

Current impact factor: 1.27

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.274
2013 Impact Factor 1.152
2012 Impact Factor 1.704
2011 Impact Factor 1.976
2010 Impact Factor 1.994
2009 Impact Factor 1.542
2008 Impact Factor 1.188
2007 Impact Factor 1.164
2006 Impact Factor 1.518
2005 Impact Factor 1.994
2004 Impact Factor 1.823
2003 Impact Factor 1.489
2002 Impact Factor 1.208
2001 Impact Factor 1.133
2000 Impact Factor 1.054
1999 Impact Factor 0.947
1998 Impact Factor 0.779
1997 Impact Factor 1.056
1996 Impact Factor 0.996
1995 Impact Factor 0.534
1994 Impact Factor 0.386
1993 Impact Factor 0.419
1992 Impact Factor 0.685

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.45
Cited half-life 6.40
Immediacy index 0.33
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.49
Website American Journal of Emergency Medicine, The website
Other titles American journal of emergency medicine (Online), The American journal of emergency medicine
ISSN 1532-8171
OCLC 45483883
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

WB Saunders

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject-based repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/07/2015
    • 'WB Saunders' is an imprint of 'Elsevier'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Diagnosis of bone fractures by ultrasonography is becoming increasingly popular in emergency medicine practice. We aimed to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of point-of-care ultrasonography (PoCUS) compared with plain radiographs in proximal and middle phalanx fractures. Methods: Between August 2012 and July 2013, adult patients presenting to our emergency department with a possible (by clinical evaluation) proximal or middle phalanx fracture of finger were invited to participate in this prospective cohort study. From those granting consent to participate, anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were obtained. PoCUS was then performed by emergency physicians blinded to the radiograph results. The criterion standard test for diagnosis was radiograph interpretation by an orthopedic surgeon blinded to the ultrasonographic findings. Results: During the study period, 212 patients with an injury to the proximal or middle phalanx presented to the emergency department. Of these, 93 patients met exclusion criteria; thus, data were analyzed from the remaining 119 patients. Fracture prevalence was 24.3%. Diagnostic sensitivity of PoCUS was 79.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 59.7%-91.2%), specificity was 90% (95% CI, 81.4%-95.0%), positive predictive value was 71.8% (95% CI, 53.0%-85.6%), negative predictive value was 93.1% (95% CI, 85.0%-97.1%), positive likelihood ratio was 7.93 (95% CI, 4.15-15), and negative likelihood ratio was 0.23 (95% CI, 0.11-0.47). Conclusion: Emergency physician-performed PoCUS was moderately sensitive and specific for diagnosing proximal and middle phalanx fractures.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Study objective: The objective of the study is to evaluate the difference in ventricular rate control using an intravenous (IV) metoprolol regimen commonly used in clinical practice in patients receiving chronic β-blocker therapy compared to patients considered β-blocker naive admitted to the emergency department (ED) for atrial fibrillation (AF) with rapid ventricular rate. Methods: A single-center retrospective cohort study of adult ED patients who were admitted with a rapid ventricular rate of 120 beats per minute (bpm) or greater and treated with IV metoprolol was performed. Rate control was defined as either a decrease in ventricular rate to less than 100bpm or a 20% decrease in heart rate to less than 120bpm after metoprolol administration. Patient demographics, differences in length of stay, and adverse events were recorded. Results: A total of 398 patients were included in the study, with 79.4% (n=316) receiving chronic β-blocker therapy. Patients considered to be β-blocker naive were more likely to achieve successful rate control with IV metoprolol compared to patients on chronic β-blocker therapy (56.1% vs 42.4%; P=.03). β-Blocker-naive status was associated with a shorter length of stay in comparison to patients receiving chronic β-blocker therapy (1.79 vs 2.64days; P<.01). Conclusion: Intravenous metoprolol for the treatment of atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular rate was associated with a higher treatment response in patients considered β-blocker naive compared to patients receiving chronic β-blocker therapy.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background: A pediatric septic hip is a serious condition that must be recognized and treated as early as possible. We describe the clinical course of children with septic hip that were treated with aspiration of the hip joint in the emergency department (AHED). Methods: This was a retrospective case series analysis. Results: Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2014, 17 children with septic hip were diagnosed by emergency physicians using point-of-care ultrasonography. All were treated with AHED. During hospital admission, a median of 2 (interquartile range [IQR], 2-3) follow-up sonographic examinations per patient was performed; 10 (59%) patients did not have another hip aspiration, and 7 (41%) had a median of 1 (IQR, 1-3) hip joint aspiration under sedation. Median length of antibiotic treatment was 28days (IQR, 21-40). No patient underwent arthrotomy, and all recovered without disability in up to 4 years of follow-up. Conclusions: The results of this cohort suggest that AHED with repeated aspirations as needed is an effective treatment for children with septic hip.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Currently, whether long-axis in-plane (LA-IP) is superior to short-axis out-of-plane (SA-OOP) during ultrasound-guided vascular access remains inconclusive. We, therefore, conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to compare the effects of LA-IP vs SA-OOP techniques in patients undergoing ultrasound-guided vascular access (USGVA). Methods: A computer-based literature search of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library (up to October 2015) was performed to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of LA-IP compared with SA-OOP in patients undergoing USGVA. The primary end point was the first-pass success rate. Secondary end points included mean time to success, mean attempts to success, and incidence of the complication of hematoma. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) and relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by random-effects model. Results: Five eligible studies with a total of 470 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria. There was no significant difference for the first-pass success rate (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.91-1.23; P = .44), mean time to success (WMD, 4.78seconds; 95% CI, -4.43 to 13.99; P = .31), mean attempts to success (WMD, 0.06 times; 95% CI, -0.23 to 0.35; P = .69), and incidence of the complication of hematoma (RR, 2.86; 95% CI, 0.32-25.42; P = .35) between the LA-IP and SA-OOP groups. Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to definitively choose either LA-IP or SA-OOP in patients undergoing USGVA. Further robustly well-designed trials are warranted to investigate the appropriate technique in patients receiving USGVA.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Hanging attempt is increasingly gaining attention and concern in the pediatric emergency setting. Indeed, intentional hanging attempts by adolescents and pre-adolescents and unintentional occurrences of hanging among younger children are becoming more and more common. In the case of post-asphyxiation by hanging in adults, there are several evidences showing the benefit of target temperature management (TTM) or therapeutic hypothermia (TH), but such data are lacking in the pediatric case. The new 2015 ILCOR guidelines suggest that, for infants and children with secondary brain injury after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, it is reasonable to maintain either five days of continuous normothermia or two days of initial TH followed by three days of continuous normothermia. We report two cases of pediatric patients who, after near-hanging, underwent 24 h of TH followed by three days of proactive fever control, maintaining continuous normothermia, and survived with good neurological outcome.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Outpatient stress testing (OST) after evaluation in the emergency department (ED) is an acceptable evaluation method for patients presenting to the ED with low-risk chest pain (CP). However, not all patients return for OST. Barriers to follow-up evaluation exist and are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the influence of demographic and social characteristics on OST compliance. Methods: Data were collected on low-risk CP patients with scheduled OSTs. OST compliance was assessed and then analyzed for correlation with potential barriers including insurance type; age; sex; race; employment status; the distance the patient lived from the hospital; whether or not the patient had a primary care physician; whether or not the patient had a history of hypertension or diabetes; and whether or not the patient had a history of tobacco, alcohol, or illicit drug use. Results: A total of 275 patients were enrolled over a 5-month period. These patients had an OST follow-up rate of 61.82% within 72hours of discharge from the ED. Patients with Medicaid were statistically less likely (odds ratio [OR], 0.439) to complete OST. Patients with commercial insurance (OR, 1.8225), who were employed (OR, 2.299), or who were retired (OR, 3.44) were more likely to complete OST. All of the other variables analyzed were not statistically significant factors in OST compliance. Conclusion: More than one-third of low-risk CP patients do not follow-up with scheduled OST. Of the variables analyzed, both employment status and insurance type were statistically significant and should be included in risk stratification strategies for OST.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American journal of emergency medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The objective of the study is to examine the effect of the opening of a freestanding emergency department (FED) on the surrounding emergency medical services (EMS) system through an examination of EMS system metrics such as ambulance call volume, ambulance response times, and turnaround times. Methods: This study is based on data from the county's computer-aided dispatch center, the FED, and the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission. The analysis involved a pre/post design, with a 6-month washout period. The preintervention period was April to October 2010, and the postintervention period was April to October 2011. Data were analyzed using standard t tests. Results: The average daily number of EMS-related calls received in the computer-aided dispatch center was lower after the FED opened (16.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 15.7-16.9] vs 15.8 [95% CI, 14.9-16.9]). One-fourth of all patients were transported by ambulance to the FED after it opened. Use of the FED and adjacent hospitals increased by 8647 visits (15.8%) during the study period. Turnaround time for the county's ALS units decreased from 26.8 (95% CI, 26.2-27.5) to 25.1 (95% CI, 24.3-25.8) minutes. The ambulance out-of-service interval decreased from 87.3 (95% CI, 86.0-88.5) to 81.1 (95% CI, 79.7-82.4) minutes. Based on change in out-of-service this study had a small effect size (Cohen's d = 0.33). Conclusions: The opening of an FED was associated with a modest improvement in time-specific EMS system metrics: a decrease in ambulance turnaround time and shorter out-of-service intervals.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The American journal of emergency medicine