Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

Publisher: Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing, Elsevier

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Other titles Journal of vascular nursing (Online), Journal of vascular nursing, Vascular nursing
ISSN 1532-6578
OCLC 45449468
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

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    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/06/2015
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Publications in this journal


  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of our qualitative study was to investigate the understanding of patients with intermittent claudication (IC) regarding the etiology and atherosclerotic nature of their disease. Patients were recruited from participants of the SUPER study, a randomized trial comparing angioplasty and supervised exercise therapy for alleviation of IC owing to an iliac artery obstruction. Patients were submitted to explorative, semistructured, in-depth interviews that were fully transcribed, coded, and categorized. We interviewed 19 patients. The majority of respondents (79%) recognized smoking as a major risk factor contributing to the etiology of IC. However, nearly one-half (47%) underestimated the effects of unhealthy dietary and exercise patterns. In contrast, a substantial number of respondents (42%) overestimated the contribution of genetics to the etiology of their disease. Most respondents (79%) were unaware of the fact that IC implies systemic atherosclerosis.This study shows that the patients' interpretation of the etiology and nature of IC was mostly incorrect. Therefore, we suggest that health care providers enhance counseling about etiologic factors and the systemic nature of IC to optimize outcomes of lifestyle adjustments. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a highly significant clinical and public health concern in the United States, particularly in the surgical population, where approximately 2 million patients of >30 million operative procedures performed annually in the United States experience postoperative complications. Previous well-documented research has revealed that longstanding national guidelines that call for risk stratification and trimodal VTE prophylaxis, a comprehensive modality incorporating 3 arms of prophylaxis-chemical, mechanical, and early ambulation-suffer from significant levels of nonadherence. The fallout includes a disconcerting magnitude of cases of preventable morbidity and mortality, and exertion of a weighty cost burden on the US health care system. This evidence-based quality improvement project investigated the level of adherence, and the causes of nonadherence, to national guidelines for VTE prophylaxis among total knee replacement patients at a prominent tertiary facility in central Massachusetts. Chief among the findings, analysis of documented data, augmented by data collected from unannounced mechanical prophylaxis adherence audits, identified frontline staff negligence as the principal cause of nonadherence in the mechanical arm. Overall, the project helped to underscore optimal VTE prophylaxis as a synergistic amalgamation of the trimodal methodology's complementary individual component efficacies. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: Although many trials have evaluated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, the impact of these procedures on the functional status of frail elderly patients is not well-described. The effects of elective open AAA repair (OAR) and endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) and comorbidities were evaluated for their impact on functional trajectories after discharge. Medicare inpatient claims were linked with nursing home assessment data to identify elective admissions for OAR and EVAR. A functional score (range, 0-28; higher scores indicate greater impairment) was calculated before and after interventions. Logistic regression was used to develop a propensity score for receiving EVAR because residents were not randomized. Hierarchical linear modeling determined the effect of surgery on residents' function, controlling for prehospital function, hospital length of stay (LOS), stroke, and the propensity score.Fifty-two residents underwent OAR and 161 underwent EVAR. Most (65.3%) were men and 62.0% were from 76 to 85 years old. Mean LOS was 8.3 days for OAR and 5.1 days for EVAR. Of the residents, 47.4% had good prehospital function (activities of daily living [ADL] score of 0-10), and 48.4% were moderately impaired (ADL score of 11-20). Higher baseline ADL score, increased LOS, and stroke were associated with worse trajectories. Procedure type was not significantly related to postoperative function or the subsequent rate of improvement. OAR and EVAR were associated with similar initial declines and comparable postoperative trajectories, suggesting that less invasive EVAR was not associated with improved functional preservation compared with OAR. LOS was found to be higher than expected in the frail elderly after EVAR; longer stays were associated with poorer functional trajectories. Higher baseline ADL scores were significantly associated with inferior functional status after both procedures. Evaluation of preoperative function may assist physicians in predicting outcomes in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a disease that includes both deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). It is a common, lethal disorder that affects both hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients. PE and DVT are 2 clinical presentations of VTE and share the same predisposing factors. In most cases, PE is a consequence of DVT. This article discusses the predisposing factors, prevalence, and individuals who are at risk of developing this often life-threatening disease. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Although much is known about risk factors for VTE, there is failure in administration of appropriate prophylaxis to patients who are at risk for VTE. A paper-based reminder system is considered to be among the most effective methods of improving VTE prophylaxis in hospitalized patients. However, their success relies on choosing an evidence-based institutional guideline and implementation of its recommendations. This study was carried out to detect the extent of application of the institutional guideline (Caprini score risk assessment sheet). The study was carried out in the Jordan University Hospital; 354 patients were enrolled in the study and distributed among the following wards: nonorthopedic surgical (n = 119), medical (n = 220), and surgical orthopedic wards (n = 15). The risk assessment sheet was present in only 47.2% of the patient's' files, and the scores in the files were estimated correctly in only 52.1% of cases. Prophylaxis received by patients matched the recommendation of the Caprini score in 67.1% of the patients. The degree of concordance of the VTE prophylaxis with the Caprini score was 59.9%. This study showed that the institutional guideline was poorly implemented in the hospital. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major public health problem impacting 600,000 people and causing 100,000 deaths annually. Nurses are in a unique position in all health care settings to educate patients and the public to prevent and provide early detection for this devastating complication. A dearth of information exists regarding the knowledge level of those affected. This manuscript presents a study that investigates and quantifies the general public's knowledge level of VTE through a 13-question survey of 325 participants. The results indicate that >70% of the general, nonmedical participants involved in the survey were not familiar with VTE. The findings suggest the need for nurses to consistently and systematically educate patients and the public about VTE to decrease morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: The Society for Vascular Surgery(®) (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) published guidelines for the management of venous leg ulcers in August 2014. The goal of this article (Part 2) is to summarize the guidelines that address diagnosis and treatment recommendations published jointly by the SVS and AVF that may affect the nursing practice of vascular nurses. Specific sections include wound evaluation, therapies used on the wound bed itself, compression, and operative or endovascular management. Part 1, published elsewhere in this issue, addressed the epidemiology and financial impact of ulcers, venous anatomy, pathophysiology of venous leg ulcer development, clinical manifestations, and prevention of venous leg ulcers. These 2 parts together provide a comprehensive summary of the joint SVS and AVF guidelines for care of venous leg ulcers. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a complex chronic vascular condition with multifaceted primary and secondary etiologies leading to structural and functional changes in veins and valves and blood flow of the lower legs. As a consequence, a spectrum of clinical manifestations arise, ranging from symptoms of mild leg heaviness and achiness to debilitating pain, and signs of skin changes, such as eczema and hemosiderosis, to nonhealing, heavily draining venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Triggers such as trauma to the skin are responsible for a large majority of VLU recurrences. Diagnostic testing for venous reflux includes ultrasound imaging; unfortunately, there are no diagnostic tests to predict VLUs. The hallmark of treatment of both CVD and VLUs is compression. Leg elevation, exercise, and wound management with dressings and advanced healing technologies that provide an environment conducive to healing should focus on reducing pain, necrotic debris, drainage, and odor, as well as preventing infection. VLUs that become chronic without evidence of healing over a 4-week period respond best to multidisciplinary wound experts within a framework of patient-centered care. Nurses are in key positions to provide early recognition of the signs and symptoms as well as initiate prompt diagnostic and promote early treatment to offset the progression of the disease and improve quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism is defined as an acute venous thrombotic event that targets two disease entities: deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism, or both. The most common site of DVT origin is in the lower extremities, with 50% of patients exhibiting no symptoms. Although anticoagulation is the gold standard for DVT, early clot removal, especially of proximal iliofemoral DVT, is felt to reduce the incidence of postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) by preserving valve function. Up to one-half of all patients with an iliofemoral DVT treated only with anticoagulation subsequently develop long-term complications, including PTS. Beside anticoagulation, DVT treatment options may include pharmaceutical and/or mechanical therapies. Mechanical therapies consist of either endovascular percutaneous catheter-directed (PCD) interventions or open operative thrombectomy. There are several different PCD procedures available, consisting of catheter-directed thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, combination pharmacomechanical devices, and postthrombus extraction (angioplasty and/or stenting). Endovascular therapies in the management of acute iliofemoral DVT are evolving with a variety of devices available to treat this disease entity. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the PCD therapies used when treating patients experiencing an acute iliofemoral DVT along with associated nursing considerations. Off-label device use is not included. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: Management of chronic venous leg ulcers (VLU) can be frustrating for both patient and practitioner. It is a significant source of disability and cost of care. Before the practitioner enters the management phase of VLU care, it is helpful to understand the impact of VLUs. Additionally, it is essential to understand the structure and function of the venous system and manifestations indicative of a dysfunction of the system. This article focuses on the epidemiology, structure, and function of the venous system as well as clinical manifestations and prevention. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Journal of vascular nursing: official publication of the Society for Peripheral Vascular Nursing