Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Journal description

With articles ranging from notes to completed studies, Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering is a comprehensive journal that provides an international forum for the rapid publication of essential information - including the latest engineering innovations, effects of pollutants on health, control systems, laws, and projections pertinent to environmental problems whether in the air, water, or soil. This timely journal offers answers to serious contemporary environmental issues.

Current impact factor: 1.16

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.164
2013 Impact Factor 1.135
2012 Impact Factor 1.252
2011 Impact Factor 1.19
2010 Impact Factor 1.107
2009 Impact Factor 1.363
2008 Impact Factor 1.002
2007 Impact Factor 0.967
1996 Impact Factor 0.58
1995 Impact Factor 0.615
1994 Impact Factor 0.467
1993 Impact Factor 0.616
1992 Impact Factor 0.354

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.24
Cited half-life 7.20
Immediacy index 0.28
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.30
Website Journal of Environmental Science and Health - Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering website
Other titles Journal of environmental science and health., Toxic hazardous substances and environmental engineering, Toxic/hazardous substances & environmental engineering
ISSN 1532-4117
OCLC 50757651
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Thermal pretreatment effect of a mixture of organic wastes (physicochemical sludge, excreta of broiler chickens and sugarcane wastes (SCW)) in the solubilization and biodegradability organic matter as well as bioenergy production by anaerobic digestion was evaluated. Two different mixtures of physicochemical sludge, excreta of broiler chickens and SCW (70%, 15%, 15% and 60%, 20%, 20% of VS, respectively) were treated at different temperatures (80°C, 85°C and 90°C) and contact time (30, 60 and 90 min). Results indicate that, organic matter solubilization degree increased from 1.14 to 6.56%; subsequently, in the anaerobic digestion process, an increase of 50% in the volatile solids removal and 10% in biogas production was observed, while, retention time decreased from 23 up to 9 days. The results obtained were similar to pilot-scale. In both experimental scales it showed that the synergy produced by the simultaneous anaerobic digestion of different substrates could increase bioenergy production up to 1.3 L bio g(-1) VS removed and 0.82 L CH4 g(-1) VS removed. The treatment conditions presented in this study allow for large residue quantities to be treated and large bioenergy quantities to be produced (10% higher than during conventional treatment) without increasing the anaerobic digester volume.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, the performance of poly(layered double hydroxides) [poly(LDHs)] beads as an adsorbent for arsenate removal from aqueous solution was investigated. The poly(LDHs) beads were prepared by immobilizing LDHs into spherical alginate/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-glutaraldehyde beads (spherical polymer beads). Batch adsorption studies were conducted to assess the effect of contact time, solution pH, initial arsenate concentrations and co-existing anions on arsenate removal performance. The potential reuse of these poly(LDHs) beads was also investigated. Approximately 79.1 to 91.2% of arsenic was removed from an arsenate solution (50 mg As L(-1)) by poly(LDHs). The adsorption data were well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics model and the Langmuir isotherm model, and the adsorption capacities of these poly(LDHs) beads at pH 8 were from 1.64 to 1.73 mg As g(-1), as calculated from the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The adsorption ability of the poly(LDHs) beads decreased by approximately 5-6% after 5 adsorption-desorption cycles. Phosphates markedly decreased arsenate removal. The effect of co-existing anions on the adsorption capacity declined in the following order: HPO4 (2-) > HCO3 (-) > SO4 (2-) > Cl(-). A fixed-bed column study was conducted with real-life arsenic-containing water. The breakthrough time was found to be from 7 to 10 h. Under optimized conditions, the poly(LDHs) removed more than 82% of total arsenic. The results obtained in this study will be useful for further extending the adsorbents to the field scale or for designing pilot plants in future studies. From the viewpoint of environmental friendliness, the poly(LDHs) beads are a potential cost-effective adsorbent for arsenate removal in water treatment.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: The performance of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands in the removal of micropollutants from a wastewater treatment plant effluent was evaluated at mesocosm level. Fifteen mesocosms were studied following a modified Latin Square experimental design with six additional points. Three variables at three levels were studied: porous media -PM- (river gravel, fine volcanic gravel and coarse volcanic gravel), macrophyte type -M- (Thypa latiffolia, Phragmites australis, and Cyperus papyrus) and hydraulic retention time -HRT- (1, 3 and 5 days). As response variables the removal percentages of the total organic load of the effluent (BOD5) and the loads of several micropollutants (caffeine, galaxolide, tonalide, alkylphenols and their monoethoxylates and diethoxylates, methyl dihydrojasmonate, sunscreen UV-15 and parsol) were used. The results showed that the systems remove between 70% and 75% of the organic load and that all the micropollutants were degraded at different extents, from 55% to 99%. The HRT was the variable that showed major effects on the treatment process, while M and PM showed no statistically significant differences in the used experimental conditions.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: The photolytic degradation of 4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP) in aqueous solution was investigated using three kinds of systems: UV-C directly photodegradation system, UV/H2O2 and UV/S2O8(2-) system. Under experimental conditions, the degradation rate of 4-t-BP was in the order: UV/S2O8(2-) > UV/H2O2 > UV-C. The reaction kinetics of UV/S2O8(2-) system were thoroughly investigated. The increase of S2O8(2-) concentration enhanced the 4-t-BP degradation rate, which was inhibited when the concentration of S2O8(2-) exceeded 4.0 mM. The highest efficacy in 4-t-BP degradation was obtained at pH 6.5. The oxidation rate of 4-t-BP could be accelerated by increasing the reaction temperature and irradiation intensity. The highest rate constant (kobs = 8.4 × 10(-2) min(-1)) was acquired when the reaction temperature was 45°C. The irradiation intensity was measured by irradiation distance, and the optimum irradiation distance was 10 cm. Moreover, the preliminary mechanism of 4-t-BP degradation was studied. The bond scission of the 4-t-BP molecule occurred by the oxidation of SO4(•-), which dimerized and formed two main primary products. Under the conditions of room temperature (25°C±1°C) and low concentration of K2S2O8 (0.5 mM), 35.4% of total organic carbon (TOC) was removed after 8.5-h irradiation. The results showed that UV/S2O8(2-) system was effective for the degradation of 4-t-BP.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Lead exposure can induce increased blood pressure. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain lead-induced hypertension. Changes in angiotensinogen (AGT) expression levels or gene variants may also influence blood pressure. In this study, we hypothesized that AGT expression levels or gene variants contribute to lead-induced hypertension. A preliminary HEK293 cell model experiment was performed to analyze the association between AGT expression and lead exposure. In a population-based study, serum AGT level was measured in both lead-exposed and control populations. To further detect the influence of AGT gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in lead-induced hypertension, two SNPs (rs699 and rs4762) were genotyped in a case-control study including 219 lead-exposed subjects and 393 controls. Lead exposure caused an increase in AGT expression level in HEK 293 cell models (P < 0.001) compared to lead-free cells, and individuals exposed to lead had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001). Lead-exposed individuals had higher serum AGT levels compared to controls (P < 0.001). However, no association was found between AGT gene SNPs (rs699 and rs4762) and lead exposure. Nevertheless, the change in AGT expression level may play an important role in the development of lead-induced hypertension.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Formaldehyde is a carcinogenic substance for humans. Exposure to formaldehyde may also cause eye and respiratory tract irritation, as well as skin sensitization. The main indoor sources of formaldehyde are wood-pressed products, insulation materials, paints, varnishes, household cleaning products and cigarettes, among others. Although this chemical is a well-known indoor pollutant, data on indoor concentrations of formaldehyde are still scarce in some countries. In February 2014, 10 homes in Catalonia, Spain, were randomly selected to collect indoor (bedroom and living room) and outdoor air samples. Ten additional samples were also collected at different workplaces (e.g., offices, shops, classrooms, etc.). Formaldehyde air levels found in homes ranged from 10.7 to 47.7 μg m(-3), from 9.65 to 37.2 μg m(-3), and from 0.96 to 3.37 μg m(-3) in bedrooms, living rooms, and outdoors, respectively. Meanwhile, at workplaces, indoor air levels ranged from 5.86 to 40.4 μg m(-3). These levels are in agreement with data found in the scientific literature. Non-carcinogenic risks were above the threshold limit (HQ > 1), and carcinogenic risks were not acceptable either (>10(-4)). Despite the current study limitations, the results confirm that formaldehyde indoor levels are a matter of health concern, which must be taken into account by policymakers and regulatory bodies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: An integrated process involving conventional anaerobic digestion and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has attracted attention recently to produce sustainable energy and to treat wastewater efficiently. To evaluate the possibility of CH4-producing process (BioCH4)-MFC or H2-producing process (BioH2)-MFC integrating systems, the MFC performances were investigated using rejected wastewater from a BioCH4 reactor (RWCH4) or BioH2 reactor (RWH2) treating molasses wastewater. When RWCH4 or RWH2 was fed into a single-chamber MFC reactor (designated as AC-MFCCH4 and AC-MFCH2, respectively) at different hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 1-7 d, both MFC systems showed maximum electricity production efficiencies at a HRT of 3 d. In the AC-MFCCH4 reactor, the average current density and average power density were 60.5 mA·m(-2) and 8.8 mW·m(-2), respectively. The AC-MFCH2 reactor generated an average current density of 71.4 mA·m(-2) and an average power density of 12.0 mW·m(-2). The COD removal rates were 45.7% in the AC-MFCCH4 reactor and 90.3% in the AC-MFCH2 reactor. There were no significant differences of the eubacterial community structures between the MFC systems, where Proteobacteria was remarkably dominant in both MFC systems. However, the archaeal community structures were significantly different where Methanothrix (89.3%) was remarkably dominant in the AC-MFCCH4 system, while Methanothrix (52.5%) and Methanosarcina (33.5%) were abundant in the AC-MFCH2 system. These findings demonstrate that the utilization of MFCs after the BioCH4 or BioH2 process is advantageous for energy recovery as well as COD removal from molasses wastewater.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are widely tested to recover electrical energy from waste streams containing organic matter. When high-strength wastewater, such as liquid animal manure, is used as a medium, inhibition on anode and cathode catalysts potentially impairs the effectiveness of MFC performance in power generation and pollutant removal. This study evaluated possible inhibitive effects of liquid swine manure components on MFC power generation, improved liquid manure-fed MFCs performance by pretreatment (dilution and selective adsorption), and modeled the kinetics of organic matter and nutrients removal kinetics. Parameters monitored included pH, conductivity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN), nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate concentrations. The removals of VFA and TAN were efficient, indicated by the short half-life times of 4.99 and 7.84 d, respectively. The mechanism for phosphate decrease was principally the salt precipitation on cathode, but the removal was incomplete after 42-d operation. MFC with an external resistor of 2.2 kΩ and fed with swine wastewater generated relatively small power (28.2 μW), energy efficiency (0.37%) and Coulombic efficiency (1.5%). Dilution of swine wastewater dramatically improved the power generation as the inhibitory effect was decreased. Zeolite and granular activated carbon were effective in the selective adsorption of ammonia or organic matter in swine wastewater, and so substantially improved the power generation, energy efficiency, and Coulombic efficiency. A smaller external resistor in the circuit was also observed to promote the organic matter degradation and thus to shorten the treatment time. Overall, air-cathode MFCs are promising for generating electrical power from livestock wastewater and meanwhile reducing the level of organic matter and nutrients.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: This article reports on the ability of yeast Trichosporon asahii B1 biofilm-associated cells, compared with that of planktonic cells, to transform sec-hexylbenzene and its metabolites. This B1 strain was isolated from a petroleum-polluted sediment collected in the QuangNinh coastal zones in Vietnam, and it can transform the branched aromatic hydrocarbons into a type of forming biofilm (pellicle) more efficiency than that the planktonic forms can. In the biofilm cultivation, seven metabolites, including acetophenone, benzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, β-methylcinnamic acid, 2-phenylpropionic acid, 3-phenylbutyric acid, and 5-phenylhexanoic acid were extracted by ethyl acetate and analyzed by HPLC and GC-MS. In contrast, in the planktonic cultivation, only three of these intermediates were found. An individual metabolite was independently used as an initial substrate to prove its degradation by biofilm and planktonic types. The degradation of these products indicated that their inoculation with B1 biofilms was indeed higher than that observed in their inoculation with B1 planktonic cells. This is the first report on the degradation of sec-hexylbenzene and its metabolites by a biofilm-forming Trichosporon asahii strain. These results enhance our understanding of the degradation of branched-side-chain alkylbenzenes by T. asahii B1 biofilms and give a new insight into the potential role of biofilms formed by such species in the bioremediation of other recalcitrant aromatic compounds.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Contamination of groundwater by carcinogenic heavy metal, e.g., lead is an important issue and possibility of using a natural rock, laterite, is explored in this work to mitigate this problem. Treated laterite (TL- prepared using hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide) was successfully utilized for this purpose. The adsorbent was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to highlight its physical and chemical properties. Optimized equilibrium conditions were 1 g L(-1) adsorbent concentration, 0.26 mm size and a pH of 7 ± 0.2. Monolayer adsorption capacity of lead on treated laterite was 15 mg/g, 14.5 and 13 mg g(-1) at temperatures of 303 K, 313 K and 323 K, respectively. The adsorption was exothermic and physical in nature. At 303 K, value of effective diffusivity of (De) and mass transfer co-efficient (Kf) of lead onto TL were 6.5 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and 3.3 × 10(-4) m/s, respectively (solved from shrinking core model of adsorption kinetics). Magnesium and sulphate show highest interference effect on the adsorption of lead by TL. Efficacy of the adsorbent has been verified using real-life contaminated groundwater. Thus, this work demonstrates performance of a cost-effective media for lead removal.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: The possibility of removing representative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) from water was tested using Octolig®, a commercially available material with polyethylenediimine moieties covalently attached to high-surface area silica gel. The effectiveness of removal should depend on selected NSAIDs having appropriate anionic functional groups. NSAIDs selected had aromatic carboxylic groups: diclofenac, fenoprofen, indomethacin, ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, naproxen, and sulindac. These substances in deionized (DI) water were removed by passage over Octolig columns with removal values approaching 90% at environmental pH values, e.g., ca pH 6. Fenoprofen, however, was only removed to an extent of 80% in DI water and 62% in well water, presumably a result of competition with bicarbonate ions.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: The present study consists of the preparation of activated carbon from peach stone (PSAC) by H4P2O7 activation and its detailed characterization. The influence of different activants and various operational conditions including; soaking time, activation time, and activation temperature during PSAC preparation were systematically investigated. The chemical properties and morphology of prepared activated carbon was characterized by various analytical techniques (FTIR, SEM and EDX). TG-DTA analysis showed that the pore development of PSAC was significant at temperatures > 450°C. The prepared PSAC were utilized for the rapid removal and adsorption of Acid Red 18 (AR18) from aqueous solution that follows pseudo-second-order kinetics. The Langmuir isotherm model corresponded well with equilibrium data than the others, implying that the adsorption of AR18 onto prepared PSAC from the aqueous solutions proceeds by a monolayer formation. Thermodynamic investigations showed that the adsorption process is an exothermic and spontaneous process. During reusability studies, PSAC showed complete removal of AR18 upto seventh cycle increasing its practical applicability. Finally the prepared PSAC showed the best adsorptive capacity as compared to commercial AC for dye removal from actual industrial wastewater. This confers the possibility of applying PSAC economically viable option for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants using suitable reactor.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering