International journal of obstetric anesthesia

Publisher: Elsevier

Current impact factor: 1.60

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.598
2013 Impact Factor 1.832
2012 Impact Factor 1.799
2011 Impact Factor 1.395
2010 Impact Factor 1.793
2009 Impact Factor 1.847
2008 Impact Factor 1.757
2007 Impact Factor 1.465
2006 Impact Factor 1.621
2005 Impact Factor 1.11
2004 Impact Factor 0.894
2003 Impact Factor 0.927
2002 Impact Factor 0.963
2001 Impact Factor 1.187
2000 Impact Factor 1.274
1999 Impact Factor 0.516

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.42
Cited half-life 5.90
Immediacy index 0.47
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.39
Other titles International journal of obstetric anesthesia (Online), International journal of obstetric anesthesia
ISSN 1532-3374
OCLC 45287992
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors pre-print on any website, including arXiv and RePEC
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months
    • Author's post-print may be used to update arXiv and RepEC
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Author's post-print must be released with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
    • Publisher last reviewed on 03/06/2015
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This manuscript reviews the available literature on remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia in labor focusing on efficacy and safety. Remifentanil compares favorably to other potent systemic opioids but with fewer opioid-related neonatal effects. However, remifentanil provides modest and short-lasting labor analgesia that is consistently inferior when compared to neuraxial analgesia. The initial analgesic effect provided with remifentanil also diminishes as labor progresses. In several studies, remifentanil induced significant respiratory depressant effects in laboring women with episodes of desaturation, hypoventilation and even apnea. Given the safety concerns, we recommend that remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia should not be a routine analgesia technique during labor. In cases where neuraxial analgesia is refused or contraindicated and the use of remifentanil justified, continuous and careful monitoring is required to detect respiratory depression to provide safe care of both the pregnant woman and unborn child.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: We present a case of accidental injection of tranexamic acid during spinal anesthesia for an elective cesarean delivery. Immediately following the intrathecal injection of 2 mL of solution, the patient complained of severe back pain, followed by muscle spasm and tetany. As there was no evidence of spinal block, the medications given were checked and a ‘used’ ampoule of tranexamic acid was found on the spinal tray. General anesthesia was induced but muscle spasm and tetany persisted despite administration of a non-depolarizing muscle relaxant. Hemodynamic instability, ventricular tachycardia, and status epilepticus developed, which were refractory to phenytoin, diazepam, and infusions of thiopental, midazolam and amiodarone. Magnesium sulfate was administered postoperatively in the intensive care unit, following which the frequency of seizures decreased, eventually stopping. Unfortunately, on postoperative day three the patient died from cardiopulmonary arrest after an oxygen supply failure that was not associated with the initial event. This report underlines the importance of double-checking medications before injection in order to avoid a drug error. As well, it suggests that magnesium sulfate may be useful in stopping seizures caused by the intrathecal injection of tranexamic acid.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The management of patients with morbidly adherent placenta has been described using vascular balloon catheters placed in the iliac arteries, but rarely in the aorta. This case series presents our experience with prophylactic lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion in 45 women. Methods: The records of patients in our centre who underwent caesarean section between May 2013 and June 2014 were retrospectively analysed for the use of prophylactic lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion. Results: Forty-five cases were identified. All patients had a morbidly adherent placenta, including placenta accreta (n=22), placenta increta (n=20) and placenta percreta (n=3). A subtotal hysterectomy was performed in four cases. Eleven of the 45 patients received red blood cell transfusion of a mean of 1.7 units. Mean preoperative and postoperative haemoglobin concentrations were 10.1g/dL and 9.4g/dL, respectively. Mean estimated blood loss was 835mL [range 200-6000mL]. The incidence of complications was 4.4% (2/45), including one case of lower extremity arterial thrombosis and one case of ischaemic injury to the femoral nerve. Follow up at one year was completed in 22 patients at which time all babies were well. Conclusions: Prophylactic lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion has the potential to reduce intraoperative blood loss, transfusion and hysterectomy rate in patients with morbidly adherent placenta undergoing caesarean section. Careful patient selection is critical as the technique may be associated with potentially serious complications.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is a serious adverse event of anticoagulation with a high risk of thromboembolic complications. As a consequence, anticoagulants other than heparins must be administered. These may be unavailable, contraindicated during pregnancy, off-label, impractical due to short half-lives and, most importantly, may be unfamiliar to many anesthesiologists. Impaired coagulation bears the risk of adverse events following neuraxial procedures and of peripartum hemorrhage. We describe the case of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in a 29-year old pregnant woman at 27 weeks of gestation with severe valvular heart disease.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Each year, the Board of Directors of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology selects an individual to review a given year’s published obstetric anesthesiology literature. This individual then produces a syllabus of the year’s most influential publications, delivers the Ostheimer Lecture at the Society’s annual meeting, the Hughes Lecture at the following year’s Sol Shnider meeting, and writes corresponding review articles. This 2016 Hughes Lecture review article focuses specifically on the 2014 publications that relate to maternal morbidity and mortality. It begins by discussing the 2014 research that was published on severe maternal morbidity and maternal mortality in developed countries. This is followed by a discussion of specific coexisting diseases and specific causes of severe maternal mortality. The review ends with a discussion of worldwide maternal mortality and the 2014 publications that examined the successes and the shortfalls in the work to make childbirth safe for women throughout the entire world.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis in women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves. We present the case of a 29-year-old woman who developed early postpartum mitral valve thrombus after an elective cesarean delivery. The patient had a mechanical mitral valve and was treated with warfarin in the second trimester which was replaced with high-dose dalteparin and during late pregnancy. Elective cesarean delivery was performed under general anesthesia at 37 weeks of gestation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for postoperative care and within 30 min, she developed dyspnea and hypoxia requiring mechanical ventilation. She deteriorated rapidly and developed pulmonary edema, worsening hypoxia and severe acidosis. Urgent extra corporeal membrane oxygenation was initiated. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a mitral valve thrombus. The patient underwent a successful mitral valve replacement after three days on extra corporeal membrane oxygenation. This case highlights the importance of multidisciplinary care and frequent monitoring of anticoagulation during care of pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: We hypothesised that preoperative administration of a single-dose of pregabalin would be associated with lower morphine consumption after uncomplicated caesarean delivery. Methods: After Institutional Ethics Committee approval, 135 parturients scheduled for elective caesarean delivery under spinal anaesthesia were randomly allocated to receive either placebo, or oral pregabalin 150mg or 300mg, one hour before induction of anaesthesia. Maternal cumulative morphine requirement at 24h, pain scores, sedation scores, nausea and vomiting, pruritus, pregabalin-related adverse effects, Apgar scores, Neurologic and Adaptive Capacity scores and umbilical cord acid-base status were recorded. Results: Compared with placebo or pregabalin 150mg, the use of a preoperative dose of pregabalin 300mg resulted in significantly lower cumulative morphine consumption at 24h (mean dose: placebo 12.9mg [95% CI 11.6 to 14.2]; pregabalin 150mg 11.9mg; [95% CI 10.7 to 13.1]; pregabalin 300mg 6mg [95% CI 5.4 to 7.3]; P<0.001). Pregabalin 300mg resulted in lower pain scores at 4h and 6h after delivery (P<0.001), and fewer instances of nausea, vomiting and pruritus (P<0.009). Dizziness and abnormal vision were observed most frequently in the pregabalin 300mg group (P<0.05 and P<0.009, respectively). The three groups were similar in terms of maternal sedation, Apgar scores, Neurologic and Adaptive Capacity scores and umbilical cord acid-base status. Three babies in the pregabalin 300mg group (6.7%) experienced short-term poor latching-on for breastfeeding. Conclusion: In our study, preoperative administration of pregabalin 300mg reduced postoperative morphine consumption and early postoperative pain in parturients undergoing elective caesarean delivery, although maternal side effects were more common.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic myeloid leukemia is rare in pregnancy with an estimated incidence of 1:75000. It is a genetic myeloproliferative disorder marked by increased and unregulated growth of myeloid cells in the bone marrow. The terminal phase of chronic myeloid leukemia may develop into a blast crisis, defined as >30% myeloblasts in the circulation. A blast crisis resembles an acute leukemia and is associated with rapid clinical deterioration and short survival. Targeted gene therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is effective in treatment but when these agents are discontinued, as in pregnancy, the patient may relapse and blast cells may enter the circulation. Theoretically, a central nervous system blast crisis may be induced by inadvertent intrathecal seeding of circulating blast cells, and is associated with a high mortality rate and a median life expectancy of three months. We describe the anesthetic management of a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia and blast cells in the circulation who required cesarean delivery. After considering the potential anesthetic risks and benefits, general anesthesia was chosen. Although an iatrogenic central nervous system blast crisis is extremely rare, the high morbidity and mortality associated with such an event should be considered when formulating an anesthetic plan.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Maternal cardiac output and stroke volume increase significantly at the time of cesarean delivery. Parturients with baseline myocardial dysfunction are at increased risk of cardiovascular decompensation in the peripartum period and close hemodynamic monitoring is warranted. We report our use of intraoperative non-invasive cardiac output monitoring during cesarean delivery under epidural anesthesia in a 24-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to Marfan syndrome, aortic arch, aortic valve and mitral valve replacements and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 37%. Three distinct hemodynamic trends were noted. After achieving adequate surgical anesthesia with 2% lidocaine 20mL, cardiac output and stroke volume rose for approximately 20min from baseline values of 6.3L/min and 69mL, respectively, to 9L/min and 107mL. Values subsequently trended down and remained depressed for nearly 20min following delivery. The lack of immediate post-delivery increases in both cardiac output and stroke volume were attributed to acute blood loss, intravascular volume depletion from fluid restriction, and slow infusion of oxytocin. By the end of surgery, cardiac output and stroke volume ultimately increased by 66% and 84% of baseline values, respectively. Systemic blood pressure, heart rate and cardiac output did not appear to correlate despite the use of phenylephrine to manage hypotension. The patient remained hemodynamically stable with no evidence of acute volume overload.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Obese pregnant women are at risk of aortocaval compression and associated hypotension with neuraxial anaesthesia. We hypothesised that addition of reverse Trendelenburg tilt to the standard practice of pelvic tilt may attenuate aortocaval compression. Methods: After ethical approval and consent, six women with a singleton pregnancy and booking body mass index of 30-35kg/m(2) underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning in six different positions: right lateral decubitus; left lateral decubitus; supine with pelvic tilt; and reverse Trendelenburg positions of 5°, 10° and 15°. Dimensions of the inferior vena cava and abdominal aorta at the L2-3 intervertebral disc level were obtained from axial images using medical imaging software OsiriX™. Results: Inferior vena cava dimensions were higher in left lateral decubitus position compared to supine with pelvic tilt (P=0.002). Inferior vena cava compression was noted in all participants (59±33%, 95% CI 32 to 86). Addition of 15° reverse Trendelenburg tilt to standard pelvic tilt produced a non-statistically significant increase in inferior vena cava area (10.54±9.91cm(2), 95% CI 2.61 to 18.47, P=0.06). Conclusion: A non-statistically significant improvement of aortocaval compression was noted with the addition of 15° reverse Trendelenburg tilt to the supine with pelvic tilt position in obese pregnant women.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Background: This study was designed to quantitatively investigate differences in lumbar dural sac dimensions between the lateral and supine positions in late pregnancy. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers with singleton pregnancies at 28-39weeks of gestation were included. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in random order while subjects were in the left lateral and supine positions. Lumbosacral axial scans were obtained at the L1-2, L2-3, L3-4, L4-5 and L5-S1 intervertebral disc levels. The axial section area, anteroposterior maximum diameter and transversal maximum diameter of the dural sac were measured and differences between these parameters in the lateral and supine positions were compared. Results: The axial section areas of the dural sac at L1-2 (P<0.001), L2-3 (P=0.001), L3-4 (P<0.001) and L4-5 (P=0.005) and the transversal maximum diameter of the dural sac at L1-2 (P<0.001), L2-3 (P<0.001), L3-4 (P<0.001) and L4-5 (P=0.001) were greater in the lateral position compared with the supine position. The anteroposterior maximum diameter of the dural sac at L4-5 was greater in the lateral position compared with the supine position (P=0.019) but there were no significant differences at other levels. The magnitude of the differences in axial section area and transverse maximal diameter were similar among the levels studied. Conclusions: The axial section area and the transversal maximum diameter of the dural sac in the lumbar area are reduced in the supine compared with the lateral position in late pregnancy.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Background: A range of strategies including physical interventions, intravenous fluids and vasopressor drugs have been used to minimize or prevent spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension. Recent studies suggest that ondansetron, a commonly used antiemetic, also affects hypotension. This systematic review investigated the effects of prophylactic ondansetron on hemodynamic changes following spinal anesthesia. Methods: Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library databases and www.clinicaltrials.gov were searched for randomized controlled trials studying the effects of ondansetron on hemodynamic changes induced by spinal anesthesia. The primary outcome was hypotension. Relative risk (RR) or mean difference, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), were used to analyze outcomes. Results: Ten randomized controlled trials with 863 patients were included in the analysis. Prophylactic ondansetron reduced the incidence of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension in both obstetric and non-obstetric patients. The RR of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension after ondansetron administration was 0.53 (95% CI 0.32 to 0.86) in obstetric patients and 0.16 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.51) in non-obstetric patients. There was significant heterogeneity among obstetric studies (I(2) = 71%). Ondansetron also reduced the incidence of bradycardia, nausea and vomiting after spinal anesthesia with RRs of 0.27 (95% CI 0.16 to 0.47), 0.24 (95% CI 0.14 to 0.42) and 0.48 (95% CI 0.08 to 3.08), respectively. The doses of ephedrine and phenylephrine required to treat hypotension were reduced by ondansetron with mean differences of -2.35mg (95% CI -4.14 to -0.55mg) and -31.16μg (95% CI -57.46 to -4.87μg), respectively. Conclusion: This review suggests that prophylactic ondansetron reduces the incidence of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension and vasopressor consumption in both obstetric and non-obstetric patients. In addition, ondansetron can also reduce related adverse outcomes such as bradycardia, nausea and vomiting. However, given the relatively large heterogeneity and small sample sizes in current studies, further large and strict randomized clinical trials investigating the effects of ondansetron on spinal anesthesia-induced hemodynamic changes and side effects are still needed, especially among obstetric patients.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Background: A head-elevation pillow places a patient in a ramped posture, which maximises the view of the larynx during laryngoscopy, particularly in obese parturients. In our institution an elevation pillow is used pre-emptively for neuraxial anaesthesia. We hypothesised that head-elevation may impair cephalad spread of local anaesthetic before caesarean section resulting in a lower block or longer time to achieve a T6 level. We aimed to investigate the effect of head-elevation on spread of intrathecal local anaesthetics during anaesthesia for caesarean section. Methods: One-hundred parturients presenting for caesarean section under combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia were randomised to either the standard supine position with lateral displacement or in the supine position with lateral displacement on an head-elevation pillow. Each patient received intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine 11mg, morphine 100μg and fentanyl 15μg. Patients were assessed for adequacy of sensory block (T6 or higher) at 10min. Results: Sensory block to T6 was achieved within 10min in 65.9% of parturients in the Elevation Pillow Group compared to 95.7% in the Control Group (P<0.05). Compared to the Control Group, patients in the Elevation Pillow Group had greater requirements for epidural supplementation (43.5% vs 2.1%, P<0.001) or conversion to general anaesthesia (9.3% vs 0%, P<0.04). Conclusions: Use of a ramped position with an head-elevation pillow following injection of the intrathecal component of a combined spinal-epidural anaesthetic for scheduled caesarean section was associated with a significantly lower block height at 10min.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · International journal of obstetric anesthesia