Current opinion in ophthalmology (Curr Opin Ophthalmol)

Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

Journal description

Topics Covered: Cataract Surgery and Lens Implantation; Glaucoma; Retina and Vitreous Disorders; Corneal and External Disorders and Refractive Surgery; Strabismus; Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery; Neuro-ophthalmology; Ocular Manifestations of Systemic Disease.

Current impact factor: 2.50

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.5
2013 Impact Factor 2.638
2012 Impact Factor 2.557
2011 Impact Factor 2.647
2010 Impact Factor 2.429
2009 Impact Factor 2.49
2008 Impact Factor 2.958

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.69
Cited half-life 6.80
Immediacy index 0.42
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.89
Website Current Opinion in Ophthalmology website
Other titles Current opinion in ophthalmology (Online), Current opinion in ophthalmology
ISSN 1531-7021
OCLC 36903873
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • Pre-print must be removed upon acceptance for publication
    • Post-print may be deposited in personal website or institutional repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must include statement that it is not the final published version
    • Published source must be acknowledged with full citation
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Must link to publisher version
    • NIH authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 12 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • Wellcome Trust and HHMI authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 6 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • Publisher last reviewed on 19/03/2015
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • Vaidehi S Dedania · Sophie J Bakri
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: The purpose of review is to summarize the literature addressing nonocular adverse events in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors and to present possible mechanisms of effect. Recent findings: The incidence of overall nonocular serious adverse events varied from 0 to 39.3% and nonocular adverse events ranged from 0 to 86.9%. Few studies have reported a significant association between use of intravitreal anti-VEGF agents and overall incidence of adverse events, stroke, myocardial infarction, nonocular hemorrhage and death, with overall greater concern in patients treated with bevacizumab. Additionally, history of stroke or other arterial thromboembolic event may be a risk factor for future stroke in patients treated with intravitreal anti-VEGF agents. Theories explaining the mechanisms of increased risk of nonocular adverse events secondary to anti-VEGF agent use surround the necessity of VEGF for the normal functioning of the endothelium and the damage incurred with use of anti-VEGF agents. Summary: Current data are insufficient to definitively conclude that intravitreal anti-VEGF agents are safe, although there is a trend toward an overall favorable systemic safety profile. Caution should be exerted in patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, as these patients may be at greater risk for nonocular serious adverse events.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
  • Sarah B Weissbart · Brandon D Ayres
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: This review examines the advantages and limitations of the various iris prostheses as treatment for aniridia. Recent findings: Multiple prosthetic iris devices have been developed for implantation in eyes with aniridia. However, none is currently approved for use in the USA. Summary: Aniridia can be congenital or traumatic in etiology and can lead to glare and other visual disturbances. Treatment options include colored contact lenses, corneal tattooing, and corneal stromal implants, although these carry significant risks of infection and corneal scarring. Prosthetic iris devices can often simultaneously treat aphakia or cataract as well as aniridia, and various models are currently available around the world from Morcher GMBH (Kapuzinerweg 12, 70374 Stuttgart, Germany), Ophtec USA Inc. (6421 Congress Ave Suite 12, Boca Raton, FL 33487, USA) and HumanOptics (Erlangen, Germany). Surgical planning and technique are important in optimizing the safety of these devices. The CustomFlex iris prosthesis from HumanOptics can be implanted within the capsular bag or ciliary sulcus with scleral fixation and offers excellent cosmetic outcomes. At present, the HumanOptics prosthetic iris is being investigated in a multicenter clinical trial.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
  • Voraporn Chaikitmongkol · Mongkol Tadarati · Neil M Bressler
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: Given the increasing prevalence of geographic atrophy from age-related macular degeneration as the number of individuals over 85 increases throughout the world, as well as the recent increase in potential treatments to slow growth of geographic atrophy, this article discusses recent findings regarding retinal imaging of geographic atrophy to detect its presence or expansion over time. Recent findings: During the review period, the COMPLETE (Systemic complement inhibition with eculizumab for geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration) and the GATE (Randomized trial to evaluate tandospirone in geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular degeneration) studies, respectively, reported no beneficial effects of intravenous eculizumab or tandospirone eye drops, respectively, identified on the growth of geographic atrophy. Several imaging and visual function studies have evaluated the role of various techniques using fundus autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, microperimetry, or other investigator-initiated tools to assess geographic atrophy growth or progression over time, although the ideal imaging for geographic atrophy remains unknown. Some predictive factors for geographic atrophy growth recently suggested include genetic features, geographic atrophy characteristics in the fellow eye, or the presence of outer retinal tubulation on optical coherence tomography. Summary: Quantification of geographic atrophy is important for evaluating growth of geographic atrophy. Numerous new imaging techniques of geographic atrophy beyond human grading of fundus photographs or fluorescein angiograms have emerged, but the ideal imaging for geographic atrophy has yet to be determined.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is a subset of primary central nervous system lymphoma in which disease primarily affects the uvea, retina, vitreous and optic nerve. This review discusses recent efforts to clarify the disease's pathogenesis, its diagnosis and its optimal treatment. Recent findings: PVRL typically masquerades as a chronic intermediate uveitis in older individuals. Unambiguous diagnosis requires cytologic demonstration of malignant cells in a vitreous or chorioretinal specimen. However, cytokine analysis demonstrating increased interleukin 10 (IL 10) levels or increased IL-10:IL-6 ratio in the aqueous or vitreous, flow cytometry demonstrating a monoclonal cell population, molecular analysis demonstrating gene rearrangements or translocations or combinations of several techniques can be used effectively to aid in diagnosis. Treatment is aimed at eradication of disease within the eyes and prevention of central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma. Whether this should be done with local therapy alone (globe irradiation or intravitreal chemotherapy such as methotrexate or rituximab), or with systemic chemotherapy remains a source of debate. Even with high-dose systemic chemotherapy, CNS disease is prone to recurrence and has a poor prognosis. Summary: New techniques and innovative treatment strategies may streamline time to definitive diagnosis and may lead to prolonged survival with better vision in patients with PVRL.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: Crowdsourcing involves the use of the collective intelligence of online communities to produce solutions and outcomes for defined objectives. The use of crowdsourcing is growing in many scientific areas. Crowdsourcing in ophthalmology has been used in basic science and clinical research; however, it also shows promise as a method with wide-ranging applications. This review presents current findings on the use of crowdsourcing in ophthalmology and potential applications in the future. Recent findings: Crowdsourcing has been used to distinguish normal retinal images from images with diabetic retinopathy; the collective intelligence of the crowd was able to correctly classify 81% of 230 images (19 unique) for US$1.10/eye in 20 min. Crowdsourcing has also been used to distinguish normal optic discs from abnormal ones with reasonable sensitivity (83-88%), but low specificity (35-43%). Another study used crowdsourcing for quick and reliable manual segmentation of optical coherence tomography images. Outside of ophthalmology, crowdsourcing has been used for text and image interpretation, language translation, and data analysis. Summary: Crowdsourcing has the potential for rapid and economical data processing. Among other applications, it could be used in research settings to provide the 'ground-truth' data, and in the clinical settings to relieve the burden of image processing on experts.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The main treatment modality for glaucoma is the reduction and control of the intraocular pressure (IOP). Glaucoma filtration surgery, including trabeculectomy and/or implantation of a glaucoma drainage device (GDD), is warranted if IOP remains medically uncontrolled. However, postoperative scarring remains a critical determinant of long-term bleb survival and IOP control after drainage surgery. Antimetabolites, such as mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil, have been used for many years to increase survival time of filtration surgeries by preventing bleb fibrosis and scarring. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of: the current usage of these antimetabolites in GDD, the recent advancements of these antimetabolites in combination with other technologies, and the role of future antimetabolites. Recent findings: Mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil have been used in GDD and trabeculectomy to prevent the exaggerated cellular reaction that leads to fibrosis. The adjunctive administration of these drugs intraoperatively and postoperatively has resulted in a lower rate of the hypertensive phase, and possibly a better long-term success rate in Ahmed valve surgeries. However, the application of these antimetabolites and their multiple-dosing applications are associated with nonspecific cytotoxicity and potentially severe complications such as bleb leak and conjunctival erosion over the tube. Recent studies are thus focusing on different medications, targeting new molecular pathways, and designing new delivery vehicles to minimize current antimetabolites side-effects and increase their efficacy. Promising results of these studies have led to development of new collaborative medications and advanced drug delivery systems for better modulation of GDD surgeries' predictable outcomes. Summary: The development of small molecule therapeutics, combination therapies, and innovative drug vehicles to prevent postsurgical fibrosis and achieve better surgical outcome in glaucoma filtration surgeries is promising.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: The purpose of this review is to discuss whether vascular dysfunction and autonomic dysfunction are related to primary open-angle glaucoma stratified by the intraocular pressure (IOP) level. Recent findings: Patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) across the spectrum of IOP exhibit a variety of ocular and nonocular vascular abnormalities. Interestingly, common genetic variation in nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) and the caveolin 1/caveolin 2 (CAV1/CAV2) genomic regions, which code for proteins involved in setting vascular tone, are associated with POAG. These markers seem to stratify with POAG subtypes stratified by sex or pattern of initial visual field loss and not by IOP level. Overall, it is clear that there is also cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in high-tension glaucoma and normal-tension glaucoma but it is unclear if this dysfunction is more common in normal-tension glaucoma compared with high-tension glaucoma. Summary: Overall, POAG is likely a heterogeneous disease but stratifying cases by IOP level associated with initial optic nerve damage may be less useful than using other endophenotype approaches. Embracing the evidence suggesting systemic endothelial and autonomic dysfunction are operative in POAG will help us move beyond an IOP-centric view of the disease and facilitate 'tearing down the wall' that divides treating physicians and a better understanding of POAG pathogenesis.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: The aim of the present review was to summarize the new developments in anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) for glaucoma. Recent findings: Recent years have demonstrated significant advances in the measurement of glaucoma through the use of AS-OCT. Furthermore, a more widespread use of AS-OCT in the clinical study of various glaucomas warrants review, which includes angel assessment, trabecular meshwork and Schlemm's canal assessment, and assessment of the filtering bleb and tube. Summary: AS-OCT was recently developed and has become a crucial tool in glaucoma clinical practice. AS-OCT is a noncontact imaging device that provides the detailed structure of the anterior part of the eyes. In this review, the author will discuss the various clinical applications of AS-OCT for glaucoma disease, such as angle assessment, trabecular meshwork and Schlemm's canal assessment, or assessment of the filtering bleb and tube.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: This article describes important aspects of postoperative management after trabeculectomy and glaucoma drainage implant surgery. Recent findings: Postoperative management of glaucoma drainage implant surgery includes stabilization of intraocular pressure, possible ligature release, and management of complications such as corneal edema, and tube/plate exposure. Postoperative management of trabeculectomy includes evaluation of bleb encapsulation, management of hypotony, and assessment of need for adjuvant therapy. Recent advances in surgical techniques, device/tissue availability, and imaging continue to shape the postoperative course. Summary: Careful preoperative planning and postoperative care may decrease the likelihood of complications in tube surgery or trabeculectomy.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: Electrophysiological measures of vision function have for decades generated interest among glaucoma researchers and clinicians alike because of their potential to help elucidate pathophysiological processes and sequence of glaucomatous damage, as well as to offer a potential complementary metric of function that might be more sensitive than standard automated perimetry. The purpose of this article is to review the recent literature to provide an update on the role of the electroretinogram (ERG) in glaucoma diagnosis. Recent findings: The pattern reversal ERG (PERG) and the photopic negative response (PhNR) of the cone-driven full-field, focal or multifocal ERG provide objective measures of retinal ganglion cell function and are all sensitive to glaucomatous damage. Recent studies demonstrate that a reduced PERG amplitude is predictive of subsequent visual field conversion (from normal to glaucomatous) and an increased rate of progressive retinal nerve fiber layer thinning in suspect eyes, indicating a potential role for PERG in risk stratification. Converging evidence indicates that some portion of PERG and PhNR abnormality represents a reversible aspect of dysfunction in glaucoma. Summary: PERG and PhNR responses obtained from the central macula are capable of detecting early-stage, reversible glaucomatous dysfunction.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: The purpose of this article is to highlight some common issues when planning cataract surgery in patients with preexisting ocular pathologies and to assess the role of ocular dominance in cataract surgery. Recent findings: In addition to routine ocular examination, determination of ocular dominance and orthoptic evaluation for tropias, phorias, amblyopia, and diplopia can be helpful in planning for cataract surgery as these factors can affect postoperative outcomes. Although once controversial, cataract surgery by phacoemulsification is often a well tolerated and effective option for patients with coexistent retinal conditions including epiretinal membrane, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and macular holes. Summary: It is mandatory to recognize phorias, tropias, anisometropia, and amblyopia when planning cataract surgery. Visual potential, ocular dominance, refractive errors, and other retinal comorbidities influence cataract surgery planning and outcome.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: To evaluate the incidence of blepharoptosis following ocular surgical procedures, to elucidate mechanisms for its cause, and to identify potential risk factors for ocular surgeons to avoid. Recent findings: Postoperative blepharoptosis has been a poorly understood concept. In the search for a definitive cause, various technical components of surgery have been implicated. Recent research highlights the importance of individual anatomy and proposes new mechanisms for postoperative ptosis, including excessive eyelid tension from specula, topical prostaglandin analogue use, and direct trauma at the level of the tarsal plate. Summary: Blepharoptosis is common following ocular surgery and can occur through multiple mechanisms. Certain individuals are at a higher risk for postoperative blepharoptosis, but all surgeons and patients undergoing ocular surgery should understand this risk when providing informed consent. Operative techniques can be adjusted to decrease rates of postoperative blepharoptosis.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: Femtosecond lasers for use during cataract surgery carry significant purchase and use costs. The aim of this article is to help surgeons and surgery centers anticipate financial issues related to implementing femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS). Such scenarios hopefully can help to inform decision making around the purchase and use of these lasers. Recent findings: FLACS has several potential advantages over traditional phacoemulsification. However, although studies have demonstrated noninferiority of FLACS, there continues to be few data to support significantly improved visual outcomes. The literature does show a significantly higher cost for FLACS. As this cost can be passed on to patients under Medicare rules, there is the potential for increased physician revenue, which can be a motivator for adoption of this new technology. The magnitude of this increase is heavily influenced by the financial details of the implementation, like the cost of the laser, the volume of surgery performed, and the incremental increase in revenue. Summary: A financial analysis should be performed prior to purchasing a femtosecond laser. This analysis can help predict if FLACS is going to be a financial windfall or a money loser.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: The review evaluates the past 18-month literature related to cost-effectiveness of treating ocular hypertension (OHT) and give an opinion of the state of research. Recent findings: Three studies question the value of intensive monitoring in OHT and glaucoma. One study suggests that implementing Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study - European Glaucoma Prevention Study risk prediction in every day practice overestimates the risk of open-angle glaucoma. While two models suggest that treating all intraocular pressures above 21 mmHg would be cost-saving (but disagree on the impact of this strategy on conversion to glaucoma), another study in turn suggests than we could safely reduce medications in almost half of the patients. Two studies suggest that effective early treatment could decrease follow-up costs in OHT and one modeling study suggests that using laser in preference to medication would be cost effective in glaucoma. Summary: The results of this time-limited review are confusing as they challenge many current beliefs to continue to do more than what we are currently doing. We have a huge gap in understating whether we are currently doing the 'right' things in our every day practices.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: Cataract surgery in high myopes is challenging. Using third-generation intraocular lens (IOL) formulas, without adjustments, hyperopic refractive outcomes are common. We discuss these issues, focusing on the various lens formulas and transformations that have improved postoperative accuracy. Recent findings: Axial length measurement error has been largely overcome by the use of optical interferometry. Despite this, consistent hyperopic errors are still reported. We reviewed the postoperative refraction results compared with the predicted refractions using: standard formulas (Holladay 1, SRK/T, Hoffer Q, and Haigis) with manufacturers' optical lens constants, the User Group for Laser Interference Biometry (ULIB) constants, manufacturers' constants with axial length adjustment method, and fourth-generation IOL formulas (Barrett Universal II, Holladay 2, and Olsen). Summary: Improved predictive results is obtained with the Barrett Universal II (software constants), Haigis (ULIB), SRK/T, Holladay 2 (software constants), and Olsen (software constants) formulas in eyes with axial lengths greater than 26.0 mm and IOL powers greater than 6.0 D. In eyes with axial lengths greater than 26.0 mm and IOL less than 6.0 D, the Barrett Universal II formula (software constants) and the Haigis (axial length adjusted) and Holladay 1 formulas (axial length-adjusted) should be used.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: To discuss the increasing utilization of cataract extraction in the management of glaucoma and to highlight advances in surgical care that can promote synergistic treatment of these comorbid conditions. Recent findings: Recent years have demonstrated significant advances in the management of glaucoma through the use of novel microinvasive glaucoma devices. Furthermore, an increased understanding of the role of cataract surgery in the treatment of various glaucomas warrants review. Nevertheless, cataract surgery in the glaucoma patient warrants specific preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative planning to optimize visual function and quality of life while mitigating potential risk factors for adverse events. Summary: Although the challenges of performing cataract extraction on glaucoma patients exist, the potential benefit to these patients is substantial. With attention to pre- and perioperative surgical planning and intraoperative technique, as well as with awareness and potential utilization of novel devices and treatment strategies, cataract extraction offers a unique platform for anatomical and functional improvement in this increasingly common cohort of patients.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: To review the relationship between cognitive function and cataract surgery, as it is rarely addressed, and yet is becoming increasingly important as the number of elderly people in the world continues to rise. Recent findings: From US Census and international data, it is expected that the predicted proportion of people over 65 years of age in a number of countries will increase drastically over a half century. Therefore, the percentage of patients with cataracts and cognitive impairment, which are both age-related diseases, will be expected to rise as well. Although there are many papers reporting on the association between visual impairments and cognitive impairments, there is a relative dearth of research supporting the hypothesis that cataract surgery can improve cognitive function in patients with cognitive impairment. This reflects some inherent problems with most cognitive tests, which include both vision-dependent and vision-independent items. There may also be an element of learning from repeated cognitive tests, which may falsely elevate test scores. Summary: There is an increase in reports supporting the hypothesis that cataract surgery can improve cognition; however, there is still insufficient evidence for cognitive improvement after cataract surgery. As this is a growing area of research, we expect more studies to shed light on this relationship.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of review: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) aids in the diagnosis and long-term monitoring of various ocular diseases, including glaucoma. Initially, the retinal nerve fiber layer was the only OCT structural parameter used in glaucoma. Subsequent research has resulted in more retinal and optic nerve head parameters. In addition, OCT is being investigated for its ability to assess ocular hemodynamics. This review summarizes these spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) parameters in the context of glaucoma. Recent findings: Several new SDOCT retinal nerve fiber layer, optic nerve head, and macular parameters with good glaucoma diagnostic ability have been added to existing ones recently. The combination of SDOCT and Doppler or angiography has also resulted in hemodynamic parameters that may prove to be useful in the functional assessment in glaucoma. Summary: OCT technology is advancing not only as a tool for structural assessment, but also as a multimodality tool to assess both structure and function to enhance our understanding of glaucoma, and ultimately clinical decisions.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Current opinion in ophthalmology