Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques (SURG LAPARO ENDO PER)

Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

Journal description

Surgical Laparoscopy Endoscopy & Percutaneous Techniques is designed for surgeons who are committed to providing patients with the best, least invasive treatment appropriate for their condition.Six times a year, this revolutionary journal brings you updates on what is happening now...and what is on the horizon. You will hear about the latest clinical advances and the most exciting new academic research. You see the latest training techniques in use today and you even get detailed descriptions of operative procedures.The journal provides complete, timely, accurate, practical coverage of laparoscopic and endoscopic techniques and procedures; current clinical and basic science research; preoperative and postoperative patient management; complications in laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery; and new developments in instrumentation and technology.

Current impact factor: 1.14

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.14
2013 Impact Factor 0.938
2012 Impact Factor 0.876
2011 Impact Factor 1.227
2010 Impact Factor 1
2009 Impact Factor 0.828
2008 Impact Factor 0.789
2007 Impact Factor 0.575
2006 Impact Factor 0.566
2005 Impact Factor 0.865
2004 Impact Factor 1.152
2003 Impact Factor 1.086
2002 Impact Factor 0.983
2001 Impact Factor 0.627

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.28
Cited half-life 6.50
Immediacy index 0.23
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.37
Website Surgical Laparoscopy Endoscopy & Percutaneous Techniques website
Other titles Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques, Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy, and percutaneous techniques
ISSN 1530-4515
OCLC 41219765
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • Pre-print must be removed upon acceptance for publication
    • Post-print may be deposited in personal website or institutional repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must include statement that it is not the final published version
    • Published source must be acknowledged with full citation
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Must link to publisher version
    • NIH authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 12 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • Wellcome Trust and HHMI authors will have their accepted manuscripts transmitted to PubMed Central on their behalf after a 6 months embargo (see policy for details)
    • Publisher last reviewed on 19/03/2015
  • Classification
    yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Minimally invasive approaches (laparoscopic or robotic) are used in various operations. Our aim was to compare them with the open approach in pancreaticoduodenectomy. Methods: We conducted a search for articles published in MEDLINE database comparing minimally invasive (laparoscopic or robotic) with open pancreaticoduodenectomy on June 15, 2014. Results: Our search yielded 136 articles. We excluded 122 articles and we took into consideration 14 (10 for laparoscopic and 4 for robotic pancreaticoduodenectomies). Most cases were related to malignant diseases and tumors treated with minimally invasive operations tended to be smaller. There were relatively high conversion rates in both laparoscopic (0% to 15%) and robotic procedures (4.5% to 10%). There were no significant differences regarding resection margins, rates of pancreatic fistula formation, bile leak, and delayed gastric emptying, reoperation rates, and intraoperative and postoperative mortality. On the contrary, blood loss was less in minimally invasive than open operations, although this difference was not always significant. Moreover, totally laparoscopic and robotic procedures lasted longer than the open ones, whereas hand-assisted laparoscopic procedures did not. However, the findings regarding the number of the retrieved lymph nodes, the length of hospital stay, and costs were inconclusive and controversial. Conclusions: Laparoscopic and robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy are feasible, safe, and oncologically equivalent alternatives to open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Minimally invasive operations have the advantage of the less blood loss, but totally laparoscopic and robotic procedures last longer than open procedures.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To compare 1-year outcomes and costs between severely obese Medicaid and non-Medicaid patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Methods: This is a single-institution retrospective review comparing 33 Medicaid patients to 99 randomly selected non-Medicaid patients (1:3 case-control). Ninety-day and 1-year outcomes were extracted from the electronic health record. Costs were obtained from the UW information technology division. Bivariate analyses were used to compare study variables. Results: Emergency department visits (48.2% vs. 27.4%; P=0.06) and readmissions (37.0% vs. 14.7%; P=0.01) were more common for Medicaid patients. Medicaid patients had less excess body weight loss (50.7% vs. 65.6%; P=0.001) but similar comorbidity resolution and complication rates. One-year median costs were similar between Medicaid and non-Medicaid patients ($21,160 vs. $24,215; P=0.92). Conclusions: One-year comorbidity resolution, complications, and costs following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass were similar between Medicaid and non-Medicaid patients. Focusing on reducing emergency department presentations and readmissions would be a high-impact area for future quality improvement initiatives.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: The use of robotic surgery in liver resection is still limited. Our aim is to present our early experience of robotic liver resection. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective review of Sanchinarro University hospital experience of robotic liver resection performed from 2011 to 2014. Clinicopathologic characteristics, and perioperative and postoperative outcomes were recorded and analyzed. Results: Twenty-one procedures have been performed and 13 (65%) of them were for malignancy. There were 2 left hepatectomies, 1 right hepatectomy, 1 associated liver partition and portal vein ligation staged procedure (both steps by robotic approach), 1 bisegmentectomy and 3 segmentectomies, 9 wedge resections, and 3 pericystectomies. The mean operating time was 282 minutes (range, 90 to 540 min). Overall conversion rate and postoperative complication rate were 4.7% and 19%, respectively. The mean length of hospital stay was 13.4 days (range, 4 to 64 d). Conclusion: From our early experience, robotic liver surgery is a safe and feasible procedure, especially for major hepatectomies.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Risk factors for recurrence postoperative small bowel obstruction in patients who have postoperative abdominal surgery remain unclear. Materials and methods: The study group comprised 123 patients who underwent surgery for ileus that developed after abdominal surgery from 1999 through 2013. There were 58 men (47%) and 65 women (53%), with a mean age of 63 years (range, 17 to 92 y). The following surgical procedures were performed: lower gastrointestinal surgery in 47 patients (39%), gynecologic surgery in 39 (32%), upper gastrointestinal surgery in 15 (12%), appendectomy in 9 (7%), cholecystectomy in 5 (4%), urologic surgery in 5 (4%), and repair of injuries caused by traffic accidents in 3 (2%). Laparoscopic surgery was performed in 75 patients (61%), and open surgery was done in 48 (39%). We examined the following 11 potential risk factors for recurrence of small bowel obstruction after surgery for ileus: sex, age, body mass index, the number of episodes of ileus, the number of previously performed operations, the presence or absence of radiotherapy, the previously used surgical technique, the current surgical technique (laparoscopic surgery, open surgery), operation time, bleeding volume, and the presence or absence of enterectomy. Results: The median follow-up was 57 months (range, 7 to 185 mo). Laparoscopic surgery was switched to open surgery in 11 patients (18%). The reason for surgery for postoperative small bowel obstruction was adhesion to the midline incision in 36 patients (29%), band formation in 30 (24%), intrapelvic adhesion in 23 (19%), internal hernia in 13 (11%), small bowel adhesion in 20 (16%), and others in 1 (1%). Postoperative complications developed in 35 patients (28%): wound infection in 12 (10%), recurrence of postoperative small bowel obstruction in 12 (10%), paralytic ileus in 4 (3%), intra-abdominal abscess in 3 (2%), suture failure in 1 (1%), anastomotic bleeding in 1 (1%), enteritis in 1 (1%), and dysuria in 1 (1%). Enterectomy was performed in 42 patients (38%). On univariate analysis, 2 risk factors were significantly related to the recurrence of small bowel obstruction: open surgery (P=0.017) and bleeding volume (P=0.031). On multivariate analysis, open surgery was an independent risk factor for the recurrence of small bowel obstruction (odds ratio, 5.621; P=0.015). Conclusions: Open surgery was an independent risk factor for the recurrence of small bowel obstruction after abdominal surgery. In the future, laparoscopic surgery should be performed to prevent the recurrence of small bowel obstruction.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: The diagnosis of occult traumatic diaphragm injury (TDI) has posed a dilemma to trauma surgeons. No imaging modality can accurately and conclusively identify small defects in the integrity of the diaphragm following penetrating trauma. Diagnostic laparoscopy (DL) offers a minimally invasive method of evaluating the integrity of the diaphragm. Methods: An Electronic Surgical Registry (ESR) and a Hybrid Electronic Medical Record (HEMR) system have been maintained within the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service since January 1, 2012. The study was conducted between 2 hospitals located in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa, namely, Greys (tertiary) and Edendale (regional). Patient data were entered into the registries at the end of patient care (discharge, interhospital transfer, or death). The registries were interrogated to retrieve all cases of DL performed for left-sided penetrating thoracoabdominal trauma. Results: A total of 96 patients underwent semielective DL following penetrating left-sided thoracoabdominal trauma. This included 94 stab wounds and 2 gunshot wounds. The mean patient age was 29 years (range, 15 to 68 y, SD=8.8). The majority (59/96) of patients were male. Twenty-two (23% incidence) cases of TDI were identified at DL. Eighteen (82%) were repaired laparoscopically, and the remaining 4 required conversion to laparotomy and open repair. Conclusions: TDI presents in a spectrum from the obvious to the occult. Our results validate the utilization of DL as a minimally invasive intervention for both the diagnosis and repair of TDI in selected patients presenting with penetrating left-sided thoracoabdominal trauma.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: The aim of this article was to compare the outcomes of tissue adhesive fixation and the staple fixation of meshes in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Materials and methods: A systematic literature review was undertaken to identify studies that compare adhesive fixation and staple fixation of meshes in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Results: The present meta-analysis pooled the effects of outcomes of a total of 1228 patients enrolled into 8 randomized controlled trials. Tissue adhesive fixation of the mesh was associated with less chronic postoperative pain after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair compared with staple fixation (risk difference=-0.06; 95% confidence interval, -0.08, -0.04). However, statistically, there was no significant difference in the incidence of acute postoperative pain, recurrence, hematoma/seroma, and wound infection. Conclusion: The use of the tissue adhesive fixation method reduces the incidence of chronic postoperative pain after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair, and without any changes in the other outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: When performing an open duodenal web excision, it is helpful to identify the web using a nasogastric tube because it is often difficult to determine where the web origin is located when looking at the serosal side of the bowel. However, it may be challenging to navigate the nasogastric tube to the web during laparoscopy. We present a novel technique that utilizes intraoperative endoscopy to precisely identify the location of the duodenal web, facilitating laparoscopic excision. Intraoperative endoscopy was implemented in the case of a 3-month-old boy undergoing laparoscopic excision of a duodenal web. With endoscopic visualization and transillumination, the duodenal web was precisely identified and excised laparoscopically. A supplemental video of the case presentation and technique is provided in the online version of this manuscript (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/SLE/A134). The procedure was completed successfully and the patient did well postoperatively. Flexible endoscopy is a useful adjunct for duodenal web localization during laparoscopy, improving on the previous method of estimating the location based on a change in duodenal caliber.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Our study evaluated outcomes of laparoscopic access in a surgical residency program and identified variables associated with adverse outcomes. Following IRB approval, we reviewed prospectively collected data from consecutive laparoscopic surgeries from a single surgeon August 2008 to November 2011. Descriptive statistics were generated, and successful and unsuccessful access techniques were compared using the t test, Fisher exact test, and χ test of independence, with P<0.05 considered significant. Five hundred consecutive laparoscopic surgeries were evaluated; the average patient age was 47 years and 55% of patients were female. The most common procedures included laparoscopic cholecystectomy (29%), laparoscopic ventral hernia (15%), laparoscopic appendectomy (12%), laparoscopic colon/small bowel (11%), and laparoscopic inguinal hernia (10%). Successful laparoscopic access was obtained in 98% of patients. The most common access techniques were umbilical stalk technique (57%) and Veress followed by optical trocar technique (29%). The complication rate was 7% and included multiple access attempts in 3.4%, attending physician having to take over access in 1.6%, bleeding/solid organ injury in 0.8%, insufflating peritoneum in 0.6%, and bowel injury in 0.2%. There was a significant relationship between entry technique and failure rate. Open cutdown away from umbilicus had a higher failure rate than other techniques (P=0.0002). There was also a significant relationship between type of surgery and failure rate of technique, with laparoscopic ventral hernia and laparoscopic small bowel cases having the highest failure rate (P=0.005). We observed no difference in success rate based on age, sex, race, previous surgery, and resident training level (P>0.05). Laparoscopic access using appropriate techniques can be safely performed in a residency training program. Laparoscopic ventral hernia and small bowel procedures for obstruction can be difficult cases to obtain access, and surgeons should be able to use multiple strategies to obtain access.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE:: Restoration of intestinal continuity after Hartmann’s procedure has significant associated morbidity. There has been a trend toward increasing utilization of laparoscopy in colorectal surgery, with improvements in short-term outcomes. This study evaluates our experience with laparoscopic Hartmann’s procedure reversal. METHODS:: All patients who underwent laparoscopic and open reversal of Hartmann’s procedure between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. Demographics, length of stay, postoperative morbidity, and mortality were compared between the 2 groups. RESULTS:: Nineteen patients underwent laparoscopic Hartmann’s reversal and 62 underwent open reversal. There were no statistically significant differences in demographics, comorbidities, mean operative times, blood loss, reoperation, and readmission rates between the groups. The laparoscopic group had a shorter length of hospitalization (5.7 vs. 7.9 d, P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS:: Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann’s pouch is a safe and feasible alternative to the open reversal technique. Patients who undergo the laparoscopic technique have a shorter length of hospital stay.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Diaphragmatic hernia is a quite uncommon disease, being congenital or posttraumatic. Its diagnosis is frequently accidental. Surgical treatment can be performed through the abdomen as well as through the chest. Laparoscopy and thoracoscopy offer a surgical benefit because of reduced wall trauma and added advantages of minimally invasive surgery. Besides the improved cosmetic result, transumbilical single-incision laparoscopy can add other advantages to minimally invasive surgery like reduced postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, and improved patient's comfort. The authors describe the technique of transumbilical single-incision laparoscopic suture and mesh reinforcement for a nontraumatic left lateral diaphragmatic hernia, discovered accidentally in a 45-year-old male.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective:To evaluate the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic versus open resection for liver cavernous hemangioma (LCH).Materials and Methods:A total of 131 patients suffering from LCH operated in our department between January 2013 and December 2014 were divided into 2 groups: 31 for laparoscopic liver resection (LR) and 100 for open liver resection (OR).Results:Age, sex, presence or absence of chronic liver disease, tumor size, tumor location, type of resection, estimated intraoperative blood loss, operative time, length of postoperative hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality were equivalent between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences in estimated intraoperative blood loss between the LR and OR groups. The operation time of the LR group was longer than the OR group and the hospitalization expenses less than the OR group. However, the time of postoperative hospital stay and time of oral intake were shorter in the LR group than the OR group. The tumor of the LR group was smaller than the OR group. In liver function, alanine aminotransferase after operation of the LR group was lower than the OR group, the same as aspartate transaminase after operation. But there were no significant differences in total bilirubin after operation.Conclusions:Laparoscopic resection for LCH is a safe and feasible procedure as OR.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Robotic colorectal surgery is an emerging technique. In this study, we aimed to compare outcomes of robotic colorectal operations to laparoscopy. Patients undergoing robotic colorectal surgery between November 2010 and July 2013 were case matched to laparoscopic counterparts based on diagnosis and operation type. Perioperative and short-term postoperative outcomes were compared. There were 57 patients who underwent robotic colorectal surgery. American Society of Anaesthesiologists score was higher in patients who underwent robotic surgery (2 vs. 3, P=0.01). Blood loss (200 vs. 300 mL, P=0.27) and conversion rate to open surgery (6 vs. 5, P=0.75) were similar between the groups. Operating time was longer in robotic surgery (172 vs. 267 min, P<0.0001). Time to first bowel movement (3 vs. 3 d, P=0.38), hospital stay (5 vs. 6 d, P=0.22), and postoperative complications were comparable between the groups. In the early learning curve period, robotic colorectal surgery shows similar short-term outcomes with longer operating time compared with conventional laparoscopy.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare the outcomes of laparoscopic insertion method with a conventional open surgery. A systematical search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library up to June 2014. Relative risks (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used as estimates. Four randomized-controlled trials and 10 cohort studies involving 2323 patients were identified. The pooled results showed that laparoscopic insertion technique significantly prolonged the 1- year survival (RR=1.23; 95% CI, 1.12-1.35) and 2-year survival (RR=1.36; 95% CI, 1.16-1.60). Meanwhile, laparoscopic insertion significantly decreased the probability of surgical intervention or catheter revision (RR=0.32; 95% CI, 0.15-0.69) and risk of migration (RR=0.31; 95% CI, 0.18-0.53) and obstruction (RR=0.43; 95% CI, 0.28-0.66). Thus, laparoscopic catheter placement may be superior to open surgery in peritoneal dialysis catheter placement.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE) has been proven to be a safe, efficient, and cost-effective option for the management of common bile duct (CBD) stones. There are two guiding methods during LCBDE: fluoroscopic or choledochoscopic. Most surgeons prefer the use of flexible choledochoscopy at LCBDE, but it is a fragile, delicate, and expensive instrument. The aim of this work was to report our experience in fluoroscopically guided LCBDE. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of all patients who underwent LCBDE in the Mansoura Gastroenterology surgical center between March 2007 and September 2014 was performed. Patients with gallstones and concomitant CBD stones were included. After the initial assessment, all patients fulfilling the criteria of enrollment underwent magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and only patients with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evidence of CBD stones were included. Choledochoscopy was not used in any patient, and we depended on fluoroscopic guidance for CBD stone retrieval in all LCBDE. Results: A total of 290 patients were assessed for LCBDE: 76 patients were excluded; 11 patients were not completed laparoscopically due to negative intraoperative cholangiography (n=7) and conversion to laparotomy (n=4); the remaining 203 patients were analyzed. LCBDE failed in 16 of the 203 (7.9%) cases, with a success rate of 92.1%. The median operative time was 79 minutes, and the median hospital stay was 2.4 days. Complications were bile leakage (n=4), mild pancreatitis (n=2), wound infection (n=2), port hernia (n=1), and internal hemorrhage (n=1). Conclusions: Compared with published studies using choledochoscopy at LCBDE, we found comparable results in terms of the success/failure rate, the morbidity and mortality, the operative time, and the length of hospital stay. LCBDE under fluoroscopic guidance may be as safe and efficient as with choledochoscopic guidance.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Traditionally, nonparasitic hepatic cysts are marsupialized using laparotomy. In the last 2 decades, laparoscopic fenestration has become the preferred treatment for hepatic cysts. However, this technique is limited by 2-dimensional view and the limited mobility of straight laparoscopic instruments. These limitations may be overcome by the use of a robotic system. We describe laparoscopic fenestration of giant hepatic cysts using the da Vinci Si robotic system with the use of the Endowrist One Vessel Sealer. Methods: Our first patient is a 32-year-old female with a solitary hepatic cyst. The second patient is a 51-year-old female with polycystic liver disease. Results: We performed robot-assisted laparoscopic cyst fenestration with good clinical outcome. No intraoperative complications occurred and patients recovered rapidly. Conclusion: These data show that the da Vinci Si robotic system is eminently suited for the laparoscopic fenestration of large hepatic cysts and that this procedure is associated with rapid recovery.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background and Aim: Surgery is the mainstay for treatment of liver hydatid cyst. Different surgical procedures have been suggested, but it is important to select the most appropriate treatment to obtain the best results with the lowest rate of recurrence and minimal morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early outcomes of open and laparoscopic surgery of hydatidosis. Materials and Methods: In this study, 75 patients with uncomplicated liver hydatid cyst were assigned prospectively to either groups of laparoscopic surgery (37, 50.68%) or open procedure (36, 49.32%) during the period of 2007 to 2012. Conversion to open surgery was required in 2 patients (2.67%), who were excluded from the study. Patients were followed for about 17.86±17.64 months. Results: Participants included 73 patients: 49 (67.12%) female and 24 (32.88%) male patients, with the mean age of 38.97±16.48 years. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups with regard to the sex, the occupation, and the mean diameter of the cysts. Bilious staining of the cyst content was observed in 23 (35.94%) patients during surgery, and a maximum diameter of 91mm was considered as a cut point for predicting postoperative fistula with 69.2% sensitivity and 41.1% specificity. The mean duration of operation, postoperative pain, the hospitalization time, and the time to return to work were significantly lower in the laparoscopic group. Postoperative biliary fistula, cyst cavity infection, and wound infection were not different between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Laparoscopic surgery seems to be effective and safe, with low morbidity rates for uncomplicated cysts in accessible segments of the liver.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Implementation of a robotic system may influence surgical training. The aim was to report the charge of the operating surgeon and the bedside assistant at robot-assisted procedures in urology, gynecology, and colorectal surgery. Materials and Methods: A review of hospital charts from surgical procedures during a 1-year period from October 2013 to October 2014. All robot-assisted urologic, gynecologic, and colorectal procedures were identified. Charge of both operating surgeon in the console and bedside assistant were registered. Results: A total of 774 robot-assisted procedures were performed. In 10 (1.3%) of these procedures, a resident attended as bedside assistant and never as operating surgeon in the console. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate a severe problem with surgical education. Robot-assisted surgery is increasingly used; however, robotic surgical training during residency is almost nonexisting.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques