Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy (J Infant Child Adolesc Psychother)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

Launched in 2000, JICAP has brilliantly fulfilled its mandate: it provides child psychotherapists with a psychodynamically based forum dedicated to child practice and addresses the impact of recent theories and research findings on child treatment issues. From attachment research on child therapy to the treatment of self-pathololgy in childhood; from therapeutic issues attendant on foster care and divorce to the role of parent work in child and adolescent treatment to the special therapeutic challenges posed by adolescent substance abuse--JICAP provides a comprehensive overview of child therapy as it is conceptualized and practiced in the 21st century.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy website
Other titles Journal of infant, child, and adolescent psychotherapy (Online), Journal of infant, child, and adolescent psychotherapy, JICAP
ISSN 1528-9168
OCLC 60616427
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This commentary, “Envisioning a Home,” takes the paper “A View from the Margins” a step further, as a result of probing discussions. I am appreciative of the discussions by Karen Starr and Lewis Aron, Sara Chazan, and Linda Jacobs for helping to elaborate upon the place of children and parents in the relational model. The ideas in the paper gain clarity in response to discussions that moved the concepts forward.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: The author discusses the binary posited by Laurel Silber between child and adult therapies. However, this paper shifts the focus to the binary between classical and relational models. Classical child therapists fail to conceptualize the child’s experience as embedded in attachments and real relationships. In contrast, the relational turn in psychoanalytic theory has repudiated the idea of the “isolated mind.” Rather, relational child therapists see child and adult treatment on a continuum and maintain a view of the mind as dyadically created and shared. These seminal shifts, based on attachment theory and infant research, have created a new paradigm which rests on greater collaboration between therapist and parent. Thus, relational, intersubjectively organized child therapists have turned to an increasing degree, to working with parents in consultative relationships. The growing body of research that supports work with parents is seen as more compatible with the relational turn and more consistent with current attachment research.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: reviews the contributions to child psychoanalysis of several key child clinicians whose work has in one way or another been contributory to an evolving relational perspective / explicating aspects of the work of Melanie Klein, Anna Freud, D. W. Winnicott, and Margaret Mahler, [the author] notes that these primary contributors to the child psychoanalytic treatment literature were practitioners whose work was rooted in instinct theory / discusses the place of relational thinking within each of their treatment perspectives and the conceptions of each with respect to mutative factors in child treatment / discusses the implications of attempting to develop a child-treatment approach using a non-drive-relational model of mind (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: A European mother and her young adopted African son were referred to this clinician for an evaluation due to extreme behavior problems in school and significant difficulty learning in a group. The evaluation process quickly becomes quite complex: do we assign Western diagnoses such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder? Or do we instead consider his life experiences? The stakes are higher since only the diagnosis of a learning disorder will grant him school accommodations and fee reimbursement from the insurance. The author concludes that diagnosis does not always allow the complexity of a child to appear and be helped, and ultimately affects how a teacher will interpret the child’s character.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: In the preceding article, “How Do You Solve a Problem Like Agbon?: The Trials and Tribulations of Applying Diagnoses to Children of a Foreign Culture,” Dr. duPlessis describes the complex case of Agbon, a six-year-old African child who was referred for a cognitive-academic evaluation. Dr. duPlessis thoughtfully reflects on a number of important ethical and clinical considerations involved in evaluating and diagnosing a child with unique and challenging experiences. This article further explores the complex issues involved in the assessment and diagnosis of children from diverse cultures. Issues including acculturation stress, the appropriateness of using tests developed for Western cultures with children from diverse backgrounds, as well as the sensitivity of the DSM-5 to cultural influences are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: Classical psychoanalysis segregated the worlds of children from adults for training and professional development. This hierarchical organizational framework remains the same despite a paradigm shift that privileges relationships. The relationship that is not privileged in this organizational structure is the parent-child relationship. This article attempts to expose the explicit and implicit interferences to deconstructing this divide, thereby allowing more access to relational considerations between adults/parents and children within psychoanalysis. Relational work with children and adolescents departs significantly from adult work by moving intersubjectively within and between dyads and triads in the nonlinear dynamic system of the child’s relational context. The developmental and technical similarities and differences across the mutual worlds of child and adult can potentially form rich dialectic exchanges within the relational model. The continued organizational reliance on the division between children and adults, reflected in the procedural life within relational psychoanalysis (e.g., separate training, professional societies, journals) undermines progress, for both the science and people it is to serve.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: “There is no such thing as a relational analyst; there are only analysts whose backgrounds may vary considerably, but who share a broad outlook in which human relations—specific unique human relations—play a super ordinate role in the genesis of character and of psychopathology, as well as the practice of psychoanalytic therapeutics” (Ghent, 1992b). Attempting to capture the historical and theoretical underpinnings of what over the next 25 years was to become a relational psychoanalytic tradition. Ghent, in his foreword to Relational Perspectives in Psychoanalysis (Skolnick & Warshaw 1992), also articulated the idealistic goals and spirit of those who were central contributors to what is now an acknowledged psychoanalytic perspective. Central to the spirit of “relationalism” as a “movement” was the desire to move beyond the “idiosyncratic languages and conceptions, of extant traditions, to push beyond political polemics” and to explore the commonalities and differences of the analytic traditions from which the perspective was emerging (Ghent, 1992, p. xx).
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: Many therapists who treat adolescents encounter patients who frequently hurt themselves. Although this generates concern and anger in those around them, these teenagers often appear to be quite indifferent to the consequences of their maladaptive behaviors. This article introduces Noshpitz’s theory of self-destructive behavior and its relationship to trauma. Noshpitz emphasizes the need to define the influence of what he terms the “negative ego ideal” on self-destructive behavior in adolescents. He claims that the negative ego ideal and trauma work together to strengthen self-destructive behavior. He identifies numerous similarities between the torturous thoughts that occur after being exposed to a traumatic event, and the torturous thoughts that derive from the negative ideal. Thus, the traumatic encounter undergoes a new interpretation within the superego when it is interpreted by the negative ideal ego. Noshpitz’s emphasis on the negative ideal ego can shed light on many manifestations of self-destructive behaviors, and can contribute to work with adolescents and young adults who have lived through some type of traumatization. Two vignettes are presented that illustrate these tenets, including the transference-countertransference dynamics involved.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the construct of countertransference and its role in the treatment of a traumatized child, with emphasis on the perspective of a psychology trainee. A review of the countertransference literature is provided and then multiple aspects of the phenomenon are explored within the context of psychotherapy with one 11-year-old boy who was a victim of trauma. The relevance of three specific countertransference roles—rescuer, abuser, and victim—is depicted through an in-depth account of psychotherapy sessions with the child. The paper emphasizes the underlying challenges associated with taking on these three countertransference roles as a nascent and curious trainee.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: The authors provide the historical background for an understanding of how childism, or prejudice against children, is related to the psychoanalysis/psychotherapy binary. They show how childism is inextricably linked with racism, misogyny, homophobia, and anti-Semitism, all of which have played a problematic role in the historical development of psychoanalysis, and all of which continue to reverberate in current theorizing and clinical practice.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence suggests that insecure attachment operates on daily life through anomalies in social cognitive processing. This study sought to evaluate the relation between one type of social-cognitive processing, mentalizing, and attachment insecurity in inpatient adolescents, examining how both relate to peer problems. The aims were to examine (1) attachment-based differences in mentalizing, (2) attachment-based differences in peer functioning, and (3) whether attachment-based differences in peer functioning are explained by differences in mentalizing. Two-hundred and seventy-one adolescents (Mage = 15.95 years, SD = 1.43, 62.0% female) were recruited from an inpatient psychiatric hospital. Attachment was evaluated using an interview-based measure, mentalizing was assessed with an experimental task, and peer problems were assessed using two measures. Findings revealed attachment-related group differences in mentalizing and peer problems. Mentalizing mediated the relation between disorganized attachment and peer problems. This study contributes to knowledge of how attachment relates to mentalizing and interpersonal functioning.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: This paper uses mentalization theory to describe a style of intervention with adolescents in short-term, mandated residential treatment. The externalizing defenses—projection and projective identification—on which these adolescents tend to rely function as a barrier to engagement in treatment. Mentalization theory posits that these defenses originate from early experiences of unmarked, realistic mirroring. During childhood and adolescent development, individuals exposed to unmarked mirroring are more likely to deploy externalizing defenses, experienced in the mode of psychic equivalence, to regulate affect and manage interpersonal conflict. In their relationships with authority figures, this tendency can lead them to become stuck in a negative cycle of estrangement, frustration, disruptive behavior, and disciplinary intervention. When these youth are mandated into treatment, they are liable to externalize an alien-self representation of a critical and inconsiderate authority figure onto their treatment providers. Clinical material from a residential treatment setting demonstrates how encouraging playfulness with the treatment frame assists in marking these adolescents’ externalizations. Marking externalizations relaxes externalizing defenses, resulting in these youth being more open to treatment.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: The developing capacity to “read” the mental states of others within an empathic context is aptly considered a bellwether for enhanced psychological development. Cognitive impairments, in addition to their more obvious impact on academic performance, may also play a subtle but insidious role in limiting the child’s capacity for psychological mindedness. Developing the capacity for play and playfulness may markedly lessen the impact of these difficulties in learning. In this article, a young girl’s remarkable ability to play is described as a vital means for working around her cognitive limitations and enhancing her very real capacity to articulate aspects of herself with subtlety and nuance.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy
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    ABSTRACT: Working with parents has often been a neglected area in the field of child psychoanalysis. However, in the last three decades new conceptualizations regarding ways of working with parents have emerged in the field. This article explores ways of approaching our work with parents by integrating existing psychodynamic approaches under the conceptual umbrella of contemporary attachment research and practice.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Infant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy