Neotropical Entomology (NEOTROP ENTOMOL)

Publisher: Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil

Journal description

Publication of the Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil. Mission is to publish results of original research on the several specialties of entomology, like: bionomics, systematics, morphology, physiology, behavior, ecology, biological control, crop protection and on acarology. Extensive reviews or articles concerning current issues in entomology presented in a thought-provoking form are published in the Forum Section, by invitation. Former Title: Anais Da Sociedade Entomologica Do Brasil.

Current impact factor: 0.77

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 0.772
2013 Impact Factor 0.85
2012 Impact Factor 0.675
2011 Impact Factor 0.603
2010 Impact Factor 0.646
2009 Impact Factor 0.586
2008 Impact Factor 0.46
2007 Impact Factor 0.546
2006 Impact Factor 0.413

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.87
Cited half-life 7.60
Immediacy index 0.25
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.28
Website Neotropical Entomology website
ISSN 1519-566X
OCLC 60622301
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Piercing-sucking insects cause mechanical and physiological injury to plants. Ceresa nigripectus Remes Lenicov is a pest of alfalfa in subtropical regions of South America and a carrier of the ArAWB phytoplasma. The aim of this study was to determine the feeding habits of this treehopper and to describe the effects of the feeding injuries on stem vascular tissues in alfalfa. Adults and nymphs of C. nigripectus inserted their stylets repeatedly girdling the stem. One week after feeding, alfalfa stems exhibited numerous feeding canals with salivary deposits, most of which reached the phloem. Two weeks after feeding, cortex and phloem cells next to the salivary sheath collapsed, mature tracheal elements became sparse and appeared with an increased cross-section area, and phenolic compounds increased in cells and cell walls compared to undamaged plants. Three weeks after feeding, an annular callus, formed by abnormal cell division and hypertrophy of preexisting cortex and vascular cambium cells, appeared immediately above the stem girdle. Parenchyma cells from the outer layers of the callus differentiated to form secondary anomalous amphicribal bundles in the wound. The aerial parts above the stem girdle eventually withered and died.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Neotropical Entomology
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    ABSTRACT: Fallen branches are often incorporated into Atta cephalotes (L.) foraging trails to optimize leaf tissue transport rates and economize trail maintenance. Recent studies in lowlands show laden A. cephalotes travel faster across fallen branches than on ground, but more slowly ascending or descending a branch. The latter is likely because (1) it is difficult to travel up or downhill and (2) bottlenecks occur when branches are narrower than preceding trail. Hence, both branch height and width should determine whether branches decrease net travel times, but no study has evaluated it yet. Laden A. cephalotes were timed in relation to branch width and height across segments preceding, accessing, across, and departing a fallen branch in the highlands of Costa Rica. Ants traveled faster on branches than on cleared segments of trunk-trail, but accelerated when ascending or descending the branch—likely because of the absence of bottlenecks during the day in the highlands. Branch size did not affect ant speed in observed branches; the majority of which (22/24) varied from 11 to 120 mm in both height and width (average 66 mm in both cases). To determine whether ants exclude branches outside this range, ants were offered the choice between branches within this range and branches that were taller/wider than 120 mm. Ants strongly preferred the former. Our results indicate that A. cephalotes can adjust their speed to compensate for the difficulty of traveling on branch slopes. More generally, branch size should be considered when studying ant foraging efficiency.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Neotropical Entomology
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    ABSTRACT: Plant secondary metabolites can have opposing effects on adapted specialist and non-adapted, generalist herbivores. In this study, we used Heliothis virescens (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) as a generalist, non-adapted model herbivore to test the possible effects of Crotalaria pallida (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae) defenses on herbivore performance. Neonate H. virescens larvae were able to consume C. pallida leaves and fruits and grow for a few instars, but none of them survived to pupation. We added isolated pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) to an artificial diet at different concentrations, and PA concentration significantly affected the number of larvae that achieved pupation. Larval survival was not reduced at a PA concentration similar to the concentration on green seeds of C. pallida, but it was significantly reduced at PA concentration 5 and 100 times higher. These results suggest that PAs in isolation are not the defense responsible for the mortality in fresh C. pallida plants, indicating the importance of other possible defenses. The negative effect of PAs on fitness of the non-adapted, generalist herbivore is in agreement with few previous studies, but it is in clear contrast to a previous study on the effects of PAs on the adapted specialist herbivore Utetheisa ornatrix (L.) that were able to sequester PAs with no fitness costs.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Neotropical Entomology
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    ABSTRACT: The study of insect succession in cadavers and the classification of arthropods have mostly been done by placing a carcass in a cage, protected from vertebrate scavengers, which is then visited periodically. An alternative is to use specific traps. Few studies on carrion ecology and forensic entomology involving the carcasses of large vertebrates have employed pitfall traps. The aims of this study were to compare both sampling methods (active search on a carcass and pitfall trapping) for each coleopteran family, and to establish whether there is a discrepancy (underestimation and/or overestimation) in the presence of each family by either method. A great discrepancy was found for almost all families with some of them being more abundant in samples obtained through active search on carcasses and others in samples from traps, whereas two families did not show any bias towards a given sampling method. The fact that families may be underestimated or overestimated by the type of sampling technique highlights the importance of combining both methods, active search on carcasses and pitfall traps, in order to obtain more complete information on decomposition, carrion habitat and cadaveric families or species. Furthermore, a hypothesis advanced on the reasons for the underestimation by either sampling method showing biases towards certain families. Information about the sampling techniques indicating which would be more appropriate to detect or find a particular family is provided.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Neotropical Entomology

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Neotropical Entomology
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    ABSTRACT: This study provides information on the number of orchid bees based on a long-term monitoring study in an antropized savanna region in Southeastern Brazil. Sampling was carried out using chemical lures, and 77 samples were monthly collected to assess the number of individuals as well as the annual and seasonal species fluctuation. The number of species varied significantly among years but not among months, and there was a positive correlation between the number of species and the number of individuals in each sample. Monthly number counts revealed a seasonal pattern for Eulaema nigrita Lepeletier and Exaerete smaragdina Perty, which were more numerous during humid months but peaked in December, January, and February. Different species of Euglossa presented a significant variation in number among years, but not among months, with no pattern along the years. The community and the populations studied were less stable when compared to those of well-preserved habitats of equatorial forests. The El Niño phenomenon of 1997/98 did not result in negative effects in the populations studied; on the contrary, there was a peak in the number of E. nigrita. The amplitude in the yearly variation of the male orchid bee population reflects the evolutionary history of species living in unpredictable seasonal weather that led to the development of particular adaptive traits designed to deal with environmental uncertainties. This study suggests that the plasticity of the life cycle may explain population stability and provide greater resilience to severe climate change events in the future.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neotropical Entomology
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    ABSTRACT: Many tropical landscapes are changing rapidly, with uncertain outcomes for biodiversity, landscape function, and the corresponding landscape services. Therefore, monitoring and adaptively managing the drivers and consequences of landscape change while sustaining the production of essential resources have become research and policy priorities. In this perspective, we have applied a recent framework, the stochastic dynamic methodology (StDM), with the purpose of understanding the effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on caves' integrity using cave beetle communities (Coleoptera) as ecological indicators. The proposed method was preceeded by a generalized linear model for discriminating significant relationships between the selected indicators, the structural changes in the caves, and the epigean habitats associated. The obtained results showed different ecological trends in response to the environmental changes. Overall, the simulation results seem to demonstrate the StDM reliability in determining the effects of habitat dynamics, that is, the expansion of agricultural activities, in areas near the caves in the structure of cave beetle communities. The applied method, based on universal information-theoretic principles, can be easily implemented and interpreted by environmental managers and decision makers, enabling anticipating impacts and supporting the development of measures aimed at minimizing the identified problems.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neotropical Entomology
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    ABSTRACT: The psyllid Triozoida limbata (Enderlein) (Hemiptera: Triozidae) is a major pest in guava, feeding primarily on new shoots. Despite its importance, there are no studies on the spatial distribution of T. limbata on guava. Such studies are needed to establish sequential sampling plans for decision making in pest control. Thus, an experiment was carried out in a 9-year-old commercial guava orchard divided into 100 sampling units or plots. Double-sided yellow sticky traps were placed on one plant per plot (sample unit) to capture and monitor T. limbata adults from April 2011 to May 2012. To determine the insect distribution in the area, we calculated the variance-to-mean ratio index (I), the Morisita index (I δ ), Green’s coefficient (Cx), and the k exponent of the negative binomial distribution. Most of the samples showed that the adults had a moderate to highly aggregated distribution. Statistical models were also used to study the pest spatial distribution by fitting the number of adults captured to the Poisson and negative binomial distributions. The negative binomial distribution model best fitted the data of the number of adult psyllids captured by the traps, which is consistent with an aggregated distribution.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neotropical Entomology
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    ABSTRACT: Cotton cultivars expressing Cry proteins are widely used to control lepidopteran pests. The effects of transgenic plants containing insecticidal Cry proteins on non-target species must be comprehended for a better and rational use of this technology for pest management. We investigated the influence of the Bt cotton cultivars NuOPAL and FM 975 on biological parameters of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), a non-target pest of Bt cotton cultivars and on its parasitoid Encarsia desantisi Viggiani (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae). The experiments were conducted in a climatized room, and the non-transgenic near isolines were used for rearing whiteflies as control hosts. The effects of the Bt cotton cultivars on the period of embryonic and larval development and the percentage of adult emergence of B. tabaci were assessed. The period required for embryonic, larval, and pupal development and the percentage of emergence and longevity of E. desantisi females were determined using Bt cotton-fed and non-Bt cotton-fed B. tabaci as hosts. Both Bt cotton cultivars resulted in a decrease of approximately 20% of adult emergence of B. tabaci. Differently, an increase of approximately 10% of adult emergence of E. desantisi was observed for parasitoids that used hosts fed with both Bt cotton cultivars. However, female parasitoid longevity decreased when their hosts were fed on Bt cotton cultivars. Our data suggest that the use of Bt cotton cultivars in association with the biological control agent E. desantisi could be functional for the management of B. tabaci in Bt cotton crops.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Neotropical Entomology
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    ABSTRACT: The bean flower thrips, Megalurothrips usitatus (Bagrall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is an important pest of legume crops in South China. Yellow, blue, or white sticky traps are currently recommended for monitoring and controlling thrips, but it is not known whether one is more efficient than the other or if selectivity could be optimized by trap color. We investigated the response of thrips and beneficial insects to different-colored sticky traps on cowpea, Vigna unguiculata. More thrips were caught on blue, light blue, white, and purple traps than on yellow, green, pink, gray, red, or black traps. There was a weak correlation on the number of thrips caught on yellow traps and survey from flowers (r = 0.139), whereas a strong correlation was found for blue traps and thrips' survey on flowers (r = 0.929). On commercially available sticky traps (Jiaduo®), two and five times more thrips were caught on blue traps than on white and yellow traps, respectively. Otherwise, capture of beneficial insects was 1.7 times higher on yellow than on blue traps. The major natural enemies were the predatory ladybird beetles (63%) and pirate bugs Orius spp. (29%), followed by a number of less representative predators and parasitoids (8%). We conclude the blue sticky trap was the best to monitor thrips on cowpea in South China.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Neotropical Entomology