Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie (Can J Surg)

Publisher: Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Medical Association

Journal description

Mission Statement: To contribute to the effective continuing medical education of Canadian surgical specialists, using innovative techniques when feasible, and to provide surgeons with an effective vehicle for the dissemination of observations in the areas of clinical and basic science research.

Current impact factor: 1.51

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.507
2013 Impact Factor 1.267
2012 Impact Factor 1.631
2011 Impact Factor 1.054
2010 Impact Factor 0.723
2009 Impact Factor 0.85
2008 Impact Factor 0.961
2007 Impact Factor 0.917
2006 Impact Factor 0.515
2005 Impact Factor 0.591
2004 Impact Factor 0.567
2003 Impact Factor 0.627
2002 Impact Factor 0.448
2001 Impact Factor 0.503
2000 Impact Factor 0.422
1999 Impact Factor 0.527
1998 Impact Factor 0.57
1997 Impact Factor 0.522
1996 Impact Factor 0.563
1995 Impact Factor 0.476
1994 Impact Factor 0.658
1993 Impact Factor 0.427
1992 Impact Factor 0.312

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.60
Cited half-life 7.70
Immediacy index 0.23
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.55
Website Canadian Journal of Surgery / Journal Canadien de Chirurgie website
Other titles Canadian journal of surgery (Online), Canadian journal of surgery, Journal canadien de chirurgie, CJS
ISSN 1488-2310
OCLC 45048853
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Canadian Medical Association

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Articles are placed in PubMed Central immediately on behalf of authors.
  • Classification
    white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Surgeon unemployment has become a crisis within Canadian surgery in recent years. Without dedicated governmental workforce planning, ensuring that new residency graduates can find employment will require new models of employment. Practice sharing, whereby a new graduate and a senior surgeon partner to divide their practices, allows the senior surgeon to wind down and the newer surgeon to ramp up. Importantly, this arrangement builds in formal mentoring, which is so important in the early years of starting a surgical practice. Practice sharing may be a solution for the workforce issues currently afflicting new surgical graduates across Canada.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The optimal timing of initiating low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in patients who have undergone nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt solid organ injuries (SOIs) remains controversial. We describe the safety of early initiation of chemical venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis among patients undergoing NOM of blunt SOIs. Methods: We retrospectively studied severely injured adults who sustained blunt SOI without significant intracranial hemorrhage and underwent an initial NOM at a Canadian lead trauma hospital between 2010 and 2014. Safety was assessed based on failure of NOM, defined as the need for operative intervention, in patients who received early (< 48 h) or late LMWH (≥ 48 h, or early discharge [< 72 h] without LMWH). Results: We included 162 patients in our analysis. Most were men (69%), and the average age was 42 ± 18 years. The median injury severity score was 17, and splenic injuries were most common (97 [60%], median grade 2), followed by liver (57 [35%], median grade 2) and kidney injuries (31 [19%], median grade 1). Combined injuries were present in 14% of patients. A total of 78 (48%) patients received early LMWH, while 84 (52%) received late LMWH. The groups differed only in percent of high-grade splenic injury (14% v. 32%). Overall 2% of patients failed NOM, none after receiving LMWH. Semielective angiography was performed in 23 (14%) patients. The overall rate of confirmed VTE on imaging was 1.9%. Conclusion: Early initiation of medical thromboembolic prophylaxis appears safe in select patients with isolated SOI following blunt trauma. A prospective multicentre study is warranted. Contexte: Le moment optimal pour commencer le traitement à l'héparine de bas poids moléculaire (HBPM) chez les patients ayant subi un traumatisme fermé à un organe plein (TFOP) avec prise en charge non chirurgicale (PCNC) demeure un sujet controversé. Nous décrivons l'innocuité d'une initiation hâtive de la chimioprophylaxie de la thromboembolie veineuse (TEV) chez les patients dont le TFOP est pris en charge de façon non chirurgicale. Méthodes: Nous avons étudié rétrospectivement les cas d'adultes gravement blessés ayant subi un TFOP sans hémorragie intracrânienne importante pris en charge de façon non chirurgicale dans un hôpital canadien de premier plan spécialisé en traumatologie entre 2010 et 2014. L'innocuité a été évaluée en fonction du taux d'échec de la PCNC, défini comme la nécessité de recourir à une intervention chirurgicale, chez des patients qui ont reçu de l'HBPM plus tôt (< 48 h) ou plus tard (≥ 48 h, ou qui ont reçu un congé précoce [< 72 h]). Résultats: Pour notre analyse, nous avons retenu 162 patients, en majorité des hommes (69 %), dont l'âge moyen était de 42 ± 18 ans. L'indice médian de gravité de la blessure était de 17; les lésions à la rate étaient les plus fréquentes (97 [60 %], stade médian 2), suivies des lésions du foie (57 [35 %], stade médian 2) et des lésions du rein (31 [19 %], stade médian 1). Il y avait présence de lésions combinées chez 14 % des patients. Au total, 78 patients (48 %) ont reçu de l'HBPM plus tôt, comparativement à 84 (52 %) qui en ont reçu plus tard. Seul le pourcentage de lésions spléniques graves était différent chez les 2 groupes (14 % comparativement à 32 %). La PCNC a échoué chez 2 % des patients, et chez aucun patient après l'administration d'HBPM. Une angiographie semi-urgente a été réalisée chez 23 patients (14 %). Le taux global de TEV confirmée par imagerie était de 1,9 %. Conclusion: L'initiation hâtive de la prophylaxie de la TEV semble être sans danger chez certains patients ayant subi un traumatisme fermé et isolé à un organe plein. Il y a lieu de réaliser une étude multicentrique prospective.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    ABSTRACT: The potential for transmission of hematogenously transmitted pathogens during exposure-prone procedures is a clinically important concern to both patients and surgeons. There is inconsistency among regulatory bodies in Canada regarding the management of infection risk among surgeons, particularly with regard to screening and the postexposure management of infected surgeons. The Canadian Association of General Surgeons commissioned a task force to review the evidence regarding the management of blood-borne pathogens and transmission risk during surgical procedures. The results of this review indicate a need for several jurisdictions to update their guidelines to reflect current evidence-based practices.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    ABSTRACT: The Standardized Trauma and Resuscitation Team Training (S.T.A.R.T.T.) course focuses on training multidisciplinary trauma teams: surgeons/physicians, registered nurses (RNs), respiratory therapists (RTs) and, most recently, prehospital personnel. The S.T.A.R.T.T. curriculum highlights crisis management (CRM) skills: communication, teamwork, leadership, situational awareness and resource utilization. This commentary outlines the modifications made to the course curriculum in order to satisfy the learning needs of a bilingual audience. The results suggest that bilingual multidisciplinary CRM courses are feasible, are associated with high participant satisfaction and have no clear detriments.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    ABSTRACT: This review is intended to raise awareness of placing a pelvic mesh to prevent perineal hernias in cases of minimally invasive (MIS) abdominoperineal resections (APR) and, in doing so, causing internal hernias through the mesh. In this article, we review the published literature and present an illustrative series of 4 consecutive cases of early internal hernia through a pelvic mesh defect. These meshes were placed to prevent perineal hernias after laparoscopic or robotic APRs. The discussion centres on 3 key questions: Should one be placing a pelvic mesh following an APR? What are some of the technical details pertaining to the initial mesh placement? What are the management options related to internal hernias through such a mesh?
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The choice of bearing articulation for total hip arthroplasty in younger patients is amenable to debate. We compared mid-term patient-reported outcomes and survivorship across 2 different bearing articulations in a young patient cohort. Methods: We reviewed patients with cobalt-chrome or oxidized zirconium on highly crosslinked polyethylene who were followed prospectively between 2004 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to determine predicted cumulative survivorship at 5 years with all-cause and aseptic revisions as the outcome. We compared patient-reported outcomes, including the Harris hip score (HHS), Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Short-form 12 (SF-12) scores. Results: A total of 622 patients were followed during the study period. Mean follow-up was 8.2 (range 2.0-10.6) years for cobalt-chrome and 7.8 (range 2.1-10.7) years for oxidized zirconium. Mean age was 54.9 ± 10.6 years for cobalt-chrome and 54.8 ± 10.7 years for oxidized zirconium. Implant survivorship was 96.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94.9%-97.1%) for cobalt-chrome and 98.7% (95% CI 98.0%-99.4%) for oxidized zirconium on highly crosslinked polyethylene for all-cause revisions, and 97.2% (95% CI 96.2%-98.2%) for cobalt-chrome and 99.0% (95% CI 98.4%-99.6%) for oxidized zirconium for aseptic revisions. An age-, sex- and diagnosis-matched comparison of the HHS, WOMAC and SF-12 scores demonstrated no significant changes in clinical outcomes across the groups. Conclusion: Both bearing surface couples demonstrated excellent mid-term survivorship and outcomes in young patient cohorts. Future analyses on wear and costs are warranted to elicit differences between the groups at long-term follow-up.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    ABSTRACT: Background: When fracture management includes operative fixation with a load-sharing construct in good-quality bone, screening for healing problems or hardware failure with radiographs in the first 6 postoperative weeks may be unnecessary. I sought to determine Canadian orthopedic surgeons' current protocol for early postoperative radiographs of stable, internally fixed fractures as well as their willingness to adopt a simplified protocol. Methods: Members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association were surveyed electronically. Five examples of surgically treated fractures were chosen to represent the spectrum of load-sharing constructs. The survey collected demographic data and inquired about current postoperative radiograph protocols and consideration of a simplified protocol. Results: Of the 822 emailed invitations to complete the survey, 400 were opened and 243 surveys were completed. Most participants (91%) practised in Canada and managed some trauma (91%), but were not trauma specialists (82%). Surgeon experience was equally distributed. Sixty-six percent of respondents acquire immediate postoperative radiographs after femur and tibia intramedullary nails, and 62% repeat radiographs at 2-week follow-up. Fifty-one percent of respondents acquire immediate postoperative radiographs after forearm, humerus and ankle internal fixation, and 69% repeat radiographs at 2-week follow-up. Of the respondents who currently acquire radiographs, 33% would consider foregoing immediate postoperative radiographs after intramedullary nailing of femur and tibia fractures, while 25% would forego them at 2-week follow-up. Similarly, 58% would consider foregoing radiographs immediately after internal fixation of forearm, humerus and ankle fractures, while 24% would forego them at 2-week follow-up. Conclusion: Many Canadian orthopedic surgeons do not acquire screening postoperative radiographs after stable fracture fixation, and many more are willing to adopt this practice. These findings support investigating the safety and cost-effectiveness of a simplified postoperative radiographic protocol.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The introduction of 4-joint operating rooms (ORs) to meet provincial wait time targets represented a major change in practice, providing an opportunity to optimize patient care within an OR time allotment of 8 hours. We reviewed our success rate completing 4 joint replacements within 8 hours and defined benchmarks for successful completion. Methods: We reviewed the surgeries performed in the 4-joint ORs between May and October 2012. Using prospectively collected data from the Surgical Information Management System, each surgery time was divided into the following components: anesthesia preparation time (APT), surgical preparation time (SPT), procedure duration, anesthesia finishing time (AFT) and turnover time. We defined success as 4 joint replacements being completed within the allotted time. Results: We reviewed 49 4-joint OR days for a total of 196 joint surgeries. Of the 49 days, 24 (49%) were successful. Only 2 surgeons had a success rate greater than 50%. Significant predictors of success were APT (odds ratio 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.16), procedure duration (odds ratio 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.05) and AFT (odds ratio 1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.34). We calculated probabilities for each component and derived benchmark times corresponding to the probability of 0.60. These benchmarks were APT of 9 min, SPT of 14 min, procedure duration of 68 min, AFT of 4 min and turnover of 15 min. Conclusion: We established benchmark times for the successful completion of 4 primary joint replacements within an 8-hour shift. Targeted interventions could maximize OR efficiency and enhance multidisciplinary care delivery.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie
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    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie