Central Europe (Cent Eur)

Publisher: University of London. School of Slavonic and East European Studies. Centre for the Study of Central Europe, University College London, School of Slavonic and East European Studies

Journal description

Central Europe publishes original research articles on the history, languages, literature, political culture, music, arts and society of those lands once part of the Habsburg Monarchy and Poland-Lithuania from the Middle Ages to the present. It also publishes discussion papers, marginalia, book, archive, exhibition, music and film reviews. Central Europe has been established as a refereed journal to foster the worldwide study of the area and to provide a forum for the academic discussion of Central European life and institutions. From time to time an issue will be devoted to a particular theme, based on a selection of papers presented at an international conference or seminar series.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Central Europe website
Other titles Central Europe (Leeds, England: Online)
ISSN 1479-0963
OCLC 60621910
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

University College London, School of Slavonic and East European Studies

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 2 years embargo
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website or institutional repository
    • Published source must be acknowledged with full citation
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used (provided on request)
  • Classification
    white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article details the impact of heroin in the early to mid-1970s leftist scene, with a focus on Frankfurt am Main, but an eye to larger developments in West Germany as a whole. Heroin challenged leftist assumptions about substance use and made a deep impact on the West German counter-culture, student left, and New Left at large. Early heroin users saw themselves as part of the left, and the practices of heroin consumption can be usefully seen as a sort of everyday radical praxis. Heroin users saw in the substance a way to ‘do something’ against a society they deemed oppressive. The wider counter-culture never embraced the drug and, indeed, repudiated its use as reactionary much in the same way that they eventually repudiated the violent activism of West German terror groups. As such, heroin users took part in and helped shape the process of splintering and radicalization that defined the early 1970s counter-culture in West Germany.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: In the years following the end of the First World War, cocaine achieved unprecedented popularity in Europe, a development reflected in the number of novels dealing with cocaine use by writers from across the Continent. One such is Max Pulver’s Himmelpfortgasse, first published in 1927, which tells of a Munich-based intellectual torn between his respectable bourgeois existence and his cocaine-fuelled passion for a young Viennese painter. After a brief interlude in Berlin, the protagonist follows his new love to Vienna, but their relationship soon deteriorates. The plot of the novel is unremarkable, but its depiction of three separate cocaine-using cliques, each based in a different city and each with a distinct social position and political orientation, vividly illustrates the extent to which recreational use of cocaine spread across geographical, socio-economic, and ideological divides in the period in question. Moreover, the narrator’s essayistic reflections on the function, effects, and social practice ...
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: This article concentrates on the 'drug scare' caused by the introduction of heroin to Greece in the inter-war period. It will first retrace the story of heroin's introduction into the Greek drug scene and assess the reasons for its speedy diffusion among drug users. Following this, it will examine some central themes in the discourse on drugs and heroin in particular, such as the actual or projected harm caused to individuals, society, or the nation as a whole. Then the focus will shift to perceptions of heroin and its users, considering broader debates which circulated in Greek inter-war society, for example, the country's identity and its position within two parallel and interrelated conceptual frameworks: traditional vs. modern and 'East' vs. 'West'. The paper will conclude by addressing drug users' self-representations that were influenced, to a certain degree, by the prevailing approaches to drug addiction.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Central Europe

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: Hungarian elites saw wine consumption as a matter of national pride. The glorification of wine, and particularly of the luxury vintage Tokaji, reflected the economic interest and social customs of the Hungarian aristocracy, whose members tended to see themselves as the Hungarian nation. When liberal reformers began rationalizing the wine sector for mass production and export in the early nineteenth century, wine patriotism also became merged with the economic nationalism of Hungary's Reform Era. Hungarian wine patriotism involved the denigration of alcoholic beverages other than wine, such as beer and spirits, since Hungarian public opinion associated these other alcoholic beverages with non-Magyar minorities in the Kingdom of Hungary, such as Slovaks, Croats, Germans, or Jews. Hungarian wine patriotism thus also illustrates the rise of Magyar chauvinism, anticipating ethnic conflict in the Kingdom of Hungary.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: Transylvanian Saxon writings on wine and viniculture provide unusually informative insights as to the small East European community's responses to the impacts of modernization: loss of corporate privileges, minority status in first Habsburg Hungary and after the First World War, Romania, and increasing integration into a global economy. Transylvanian Saxons imbued wine with symbolic functions beyond its dietary or economic importance; viniculture and wine embodied Saxon aspirations and fears for the future. While ethnographers invoked the traditions embodied in wine to shore up Saxon status within Transylvania, economists extolled viniculture as an industry capable of modernization and a secure financial future for the community. Conversely, Saxon abstinence campaigners identified wine as the root of the Saxons' decline, and hoped to build a better future through its abolition. Through its symbolic roles, wine and viniculture reveal the potentials and limitations the Transylvanian Saxon community faced in confronting modernization.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: An underplayed area in democratization research, the problem of historical legacies is examined with reference to regime change theory and its negative and positive aspects. These include different patterns and types of legacies, the political utilization of the past and conflicting reactions to the communist period as well as the emergence of political learning and possibilities for 'overcoming' the past. It is concluded that such legacies may have a powerful influence during democratization but do not determine its outcome, that they rarely play an objective role in regime change, and that there is considerable cross-national variation in their impact.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: This article examines the recent discussion of Romanian-German writers' involvement with the Securitate since the airing of Oskar Pastior's file in 2010. Drawing principally on German and Romanian newspapers, journals, and blogs from 2010-11, I argue that while the Stasi debates of the early to mid-1990s were more concerned with examining literary and political traditions in order to effect reorientation in a new political and societal landscape, the Romanian-German discussion recognizes the need to transcend personal loyalties and enmities, but rarely achieves it. The Romanian-German discussion's high degree of differentiation and moderation represents an advance on the German polemics of the early 1990s, but the debate appears to be stuck somewhere between the documentation of biographical detail and a search for an effective way to read contentious source material.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Central Europe

  • No preview · Article · May 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: This article argues that literary texts can serve as 'lieux de memoire' of the Central European dictatorships of the twentieth century. The study considers literary representation of features common to the dictatorships of the last century, in particular the trauma of 'forced disappearance'. It analyses the memory strategies used by the selected authors with a particular focus on the use of photography. The article demonstrates the cathartic function of writing as it is represented in the chosen texts. It considers the following authors and works: German author W. G. Sebald's Austerlitz (2001), Czech author Jiri Kratochvil's The Pledge: Requiem for the 1950s ('Slib: Requiem za padesata leta', 2009), Slovak author Pavel Vilikovsky's The Autobiography of Evil ('Vlastny zivotopis zla', 2009), and Polish author Pawel Huelle's Mercedes Benz: From Letters to Hrabal ('Mercedes Benz: Z listow do Hrabala', 2001).
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: This article assesses the potential for memory of communism to become part of the EU’s memory culture by comparing three contrasting case studies: the Baltic states, Hungary, and Germany. It argues that, rather than the emergence of a western European memory culture that is challenged by a uniform eastern memory culture within the EU, as some commentators have claimed, the different positions of EU member states tend to be conditioned by a range of domestic and international factors. In terms of the promotion of the memory of communism within the EU, these factors can vary significantly from state to state, demonstrating the continued dominance of the national frame in the mobilization of historical memory.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: This paper revisits the controversies surrounding commemoration of the Second World War in the Baltic states and explores the difficulties of translating the complexities and ambivalences of history, personal experience, and memory into monolithic statues and acts of commemoration. In particular, the Baltic states are faced with the difficult challenge of commemorating the atrocities of two dictatorships and are failing to meet that challenge. A fundamental impediment to such collective remembrance and commemoration is the breadth and depth of historical displacement and suffering of different ethnic communities. The lack of commemoration of two marginalized groups, namely, the Roma and psychiatric patients is also examined.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: Our fascination with the ambivalences of ruin shows little sign of abating. Taking as its focus the Baltic resort of Prora, this paper explores the particular ambivalences that arise when the East German socialist past inhabits the ruins of the preceding National Socialist dictatorship. Developing a theoretical approach to the ruin as palimpsest and heterotopia, I examine three types of intervention that have been made in the post-socialist present at this largely derelict and disused site: redevelopment; musealization; and photographic representation. In each case I consider, first, the strategies that stabilize the ruin in the present and, second, the processes through which the ruin persists as a more troubling and destabilizing force. Ultimately, I argue that the ambivalences of these ruins of dictatorship are increasingly being simplified and consolidated in the post-dictatorship setting, often at the expense of the socialist phase of the site.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this article is to explore the remaking of national identity in post-communist Poland through the analysis of urban spaces, and, in particular, two controversial monuments that were erected under communism and survive to this day in two Polish cities. By systematically tracing the trajectory of the contested monuments, from their inception through their changing symbolism to their disputed legacies, this article will pose important questions not only about the development of cultural memory and of Polish civic society, but also the role of various agents involved in these processes. The article will examine the interaction between the official and local ‘politics of memory’ and individual initiatives centred on these monuments in an attempt to unravel the intricacies of Poland’s de-communization and nation-building following the fall of communism.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: Dezső Szabó (born 1879, Klausenburg/Kolozsvár/Cluj, Austria-Hungary, died 1945, Budapest) was a towering figure of his generation. Literary critic, social pamphleteer, satirist, and novelist, he aroused strong passions on all sides with his rhetorically freighted prose and his fluid, yet forceful, political views. All accounts of his work concentrate on its intent, content, or consequences, and it is widely agreed that Szabó’s ‘style’ was his most prominent trait. And yet it is as if the political and ideological impact of the man has all but eclipsed the writing itself: with the exception of one brief monograph of 1937, we have no study devoted to the detailed examination of the ways in which he used Hungarian. Such a study is what is attempted in this essay. The method is primarily linguistic: all pertinent features of Szabó’s use of Hungarian are discussed, from the submorphemic (alliteration and other sound-patterning) through his immoderate derivational morphology, overstuffed noun phrases, and idiosyncratic lexis.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: This article explores the interaction between the historical landscape of Hungary and the structure of rural society that developed therefrom. It establishes the means through which the Hungarian peasantry were able to construct the spatial order of the village in response to the particular environment of the Hungarian plain, and how this informed attempts to reform Hungarian rural society in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In this, it argues that customary practices and customary rights, in particular 'beating the bounds' (határjárás), provided a means for the peasantry to assert their own claims to the landscape in the face of reforms imposed from beyond the boundaries of the village.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Central Europe
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this article is to explore the remaking of national identity in post-communist Poland through the analysis of urban spaces, and, in particular, two controversial monuments that were erected under communism and survive to this day in two Polish cities. By systematically tracing the trajectory of the contested monuments, from their inception through their changing symbolism to their disputed legacies, this article will pose important questions not only about the development of cultural memory and of Polish civic society, but also the role of various agents involved in these processes. The article will examine the interaction between the official and local ‘politics of memory’ and individual initiatives centred on these monuments in an attempt to unravel the intricacies of Poland’s de-communization and nation-building following the fall of communism.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: This article explores how the GDR dealt with intellectual remigrants, in particular ‘bildungsbürgerlich Marxist intellectuals’, who had survived the Third Reich in Western exile. It analyses the political biographies of three such remigrants, namely the journalist Hermann Budzislawski, the publisher and author Wieland Herzfelde, and the journalist and party functionary Hans Teubner. In the late 1940s and 1950s, these three men were appointed to professorships at the Faculty of Journalism at Leipzig University, a future training school of party journalists, and thus filled important strategic positions at the intersection of higher education, mass media, and politics. However, their biographies testify to more than just individual success stories. They point to the difficulties of returning Communists in adapting to the political realities of the GDR in the 1950s, marked by widespread distrust and coercion. Behind the scenes, the remigrants in question here were put under enormous pressure to bow to Party command. As Budzislawski and Herzfelde were Jewish, the article also discusses to what extent their problems were related to antisemitic prejudices in the Stalinist period of the GDR. Regardless of individual differences, this article demonstrates that one of the central hopes of the remigrants, that is, to erase the scars of emigration, remained unfulfilled.
    No preview · Article · May 2013 · Central Europe
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    ABSTRACT: This article considers the Czech cliché ‘the heart of Europe’ and its sentimentalization. It ends by linking the Czech heart with another nationalist symbol, the heart-leaved linden. The article derives the nationalist symbolism of the heart from medieval Saxon mysticism and its descendants, the Baroque cult of the Sacred Heart, taking in Cupid and his arrows on the way. Sources from the seventeenth to the twentieth century include belles-lettres, but also political writing from the Romantic historian Palacký to Václav Havel.
    No preview · Article · May 2013 · Central Europe