Organisational Transformation and Social Change

Publisher: Intellect

Journal description

The International Journal of Organisational Transformation and Social Change (OTSC) is timely in its appearance in that there is now a general awareness in both societies and organisations that change is endemic. In the 1980s, the Business guru, Tom Peters, wrote a book in which he examined the nature of enterprise excellence, and he listed the top ten companies ranked according to their profitability. He later realised that it was more adaptability than profitability but that was important. This, perhaps coupled with positive and proactive perspective, can come under the heading of the learning/intelligent organisation. The two are connected, but while learning organisations are more associated with knowledge management, intelligent organisations are more concerned with viability and draw on cybernetics and systems. These subject areas are close to the interests of this Journal. The Journal looks to research on the shaping of organisational theory - through more traditional areas like human resource development and management systems - that has led to some interesting changes in recent years. Organisational theory has at its base the sociological ideas that concern the interests of societies. Interestingly, as the subject has developed, ideas are now being fed back into sociology that have impact upon the way we see societies. The distinction between societies and organisations is now expressible in terms of scale and focus or level. The population of an entire nation state might see culture at a macroscopic level just as the population of an organisation might see the same at a microscopic level. In this way, societies can be seen as macroscopic organisations and common principles can be applied: the Journal encourages such a perspective.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website International Journal of Organisational Transformation and Social Change website
Other titles Organisational transformation and social change (Online), Organizational transformation and social change, OTASC, Journal of organisational transformation & social change
ISSN 1477-9633
OCLC 60628620
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Intellect

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • DOI details to be given where possible
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As transcendent technologies, information communication technologies (ICTs) exist beyond the divergent equivalence of human categories of difference such as race, gender, and class, as well as operating outside traditional binary oppositions such as good/bad, love/hate, and rational/irrational. While a material grounding in earlier forms of embodied social experience remains a necessary prerequisite of interaction with virtual systems, a vast collection of technological applications now exhibit some degree of agency as they interact with humans and their environment. This development has enormous consequences for human life, human flourishing, and social organisation, raising significant ethical concerns relevant to public and policy debates. It is, therefore, pertinent to explore key epistemological questions relating to the radical and accelerated remapping of the limits of what it now means to be human. While this article does not purport to offer a pragmatic solution, it constitutes an interdisciplinary conceptual platform from which to consider the nature of the evolving human-nonhuman-machine relationship and the possible implications for humanity, civilisation, and other forms of social organisation in the modern hypermediated world. It is suggested that, by reflecting on the various representations of contemporary technoculture and biotechnology from the perspective of the arts and humanities, it may be possible to isolate those important questions which relate to subjectivity, ethics, community, and social transformation in order to prepare the groundwork for a comprehensive and critical theory of technology.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Understanding human communication in the technological age is becoming more complex as advances in technology and its use in human exchange are being magnified. New studies show that technology is no longer just a device for human connections; it is an integrated artefact in the human exchange and communication process. As a result, we are witnessing and experiencing new norms and patterns of behaviour, values in human connections, expectations of one another, language, and other symbol systems: a digital culture. This article explores further development of the digital culture model in relation to organisational work culture. Specifically, the dimensions related to digital communication and online group dynamics are further articulated from a literature review. The findings are also presented from a study of e-process teams in a distributed organisation based on data from a digital culture inventory, focus group observations, and participant reflections, which illustrate changes in behaviour, language, group dynamics, and communication exchange between team members working in a distributed organisation. The article aims to contribute new insights which could inform approaches to organisational development that view organisational culture as central to the process.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Self-awareness is a necessary foundation for those seeking to develop emotional intelligence (EI). Yet, the process of developing self-awareness can be deeply disturbing, creating inner turmoil and chaos which EI trainers need to take into consideration and manage in the learning environment. This article describes the nature of this chaos and proposes a learning environment model to assist EI trainers in the design of their EI training programmes, helping trainers to create safe learning environments in which learners can pursue EI training, thereby leading to transformational change. A review of the literature defines EI, constructivism, and chaos theory, as well as exploring elements of a safe learning environment. The literature is considered along with data gathered from a recent study of twenty-one EI trainers in New Zealand, in an effort to identify key characteristics of a safe learning environment, and positive and negative qualities of the trainer and learners which can contribute to creating a safe learning environment. Based on these findings the Emotional Intelligence Learning Environment Model was developed. The article discusses the implications of the model and concludes with suggestions for future research.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article describes the creation of a coalition among three civil society immigrant organisations in Israel. The research questions dealt with the collaborative strategies adopted by these organisations, and investigated through ethnographic interviews and document analysis what factors facilitated inter-organisational collaboration. Results showed that these organisations provided complementary services to newcomers while struggling with hostile government policies. The collaboration dynamic between the groups was successful because these immigrant associations shared similar socialistic views. Furthermore, through the promotion of personal ties, inter-organisational solidarity was forged, but overall, these activities ran counter to the dominant Israeli culture.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Among the serious concerns raised by the socioeconomic development of the twenty-first century is the question of how regional development, especially in economically weak areas, can be supported in such a way as to bring about flexibility and innovation, matters causally associated with the long-term viability and evolution of living systems. This contribution employs research results derived from the management of common-pool resources (commons) to reconstruct the ways and means by which knowledge in robust and enduring organizations of commons may support the regional development of ecosystems of innovation, that is, systems of distributed knowledge featuring polycentric administration and decision mechanisms that mutually facilitate flexible and innovative solutions. All these matters are addressed by the application of the language-information-reality (LIR) framework and its extensions. The use of this framework of analysis helps to broaden awareness and understand where common sense is a synergistic consideration, and where an enhancement of our background knowledge is necessary.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article analyses the nature of leadership in the Israeli labour unions (the Histadrut) from a theoretical perspective encompassing industrial relations and organisational change. The research questions were: How did union leaders (Ramon and Peretz) effect privatisation, downsizing, and goal transformation in the Histadrut? Which leadership style characterised the Israeli labour unions? The research was conducted using qualitative methods for a case study approach, interviewing 25 Histadrut members, and analysing organisational documents. The old Histadrut was founded as a welfare agency. As a socialist entity, the Histadrut was linked politically and economically to the Labor party, which helped to fund it while in government. In 1994, a new leader, Haim Ramon, was elected. He transformed the Histadrut into a confederation of autonomous labour unions. The Histadrut underwent downsizing and focused on trade union goals. A year later, Ramon resigned, to be replaced by Amir Peretz. He wanted to restore the labour unions’ power and broaden the goal system. This article explains Ramon’s and Peretz’s leadership styles, and how they brought about privatisation, downsizing, and transformation of union goals.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article argues that, in a non-hierarchical organisation, when value determined by position is taken away, other hierarchies emerge which introduce new power dynamics and can undermine the equality afforded by this context. It discusses various forms of hierarchy that can emerge and implications for non-hierarchal organisations. Research was undertaken with four non-hierarchical community projects on how value can be found for individuals and how they value their colleagues outside of any forms of hierarchy. The article argues that there is uncertainty as to the role of processes in this context, and they are often associated with power and control in a hierarchical context. It discusses findings from the research that show how processes can be reinvented and created to suit the relational and operational needs according to the setting.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Considering the lack of research on the historisation of educational technologies, the current study attempts to fill this void. To do so, the following research question is posed: To what extent have educational technologies and local histories controlled one another? Data for this question came from a naturalistic enquiry into a university in the Saudi Arabian public sector. Having analysed documents, interviews, and observations by means of the grounded theory technique, two key themes emerged: local histories controlling educational technologies and educational technologies controlling local histories. The consideration of both themes brought forth a theoretical proposition — that there are political dynamics between educational technologies and micro histories, with one continuously directing and driving the other. The recommendation is therefore that policymakers, scholars, and commentators should be more cognisant of the political tensions between local histories and educational technologies.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: With today’s competition, organisations are facing challenges from the economic, social, and scientific environment, workplace environment, and never-ending expectations of customers. To win over these situations requires a learning organisation that has the capability to adopt, renew, and energise itself to match the changing and challenging environment. This study analyses the level of learning of individuals and the organisation, which in turn influences the performance of a private-sector bank. The study used a questionnaire to collect the primary data based on the theoretical framework developed by Watkins and Marsick (1993). For the purpose of this assessment the researchers used regression analysis and the partial least squarestructural equation model (PLS-SEM). The analysis throws light on the fact that there exists association between the learning organisation and the bank’s performance. A leading, established, private-sector bank in south India has been taken as a sample study for understanding how the concept of a learning organisation has helped the bank to improve its performance.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In Sweden, as in many other Western countries, public health care is challenged by increasing demands for care and continuing budget deficits. Person-centred care (PCC) has been introduced as a new strategy to ameliorate the perceived fragmentation in care and is expected to decrease treatment time, reduce the need for return visits, as well as increase patient satisfaction. However, the changing clinical practices necessary for the PCC approach are assumed to require new accountability practices. This article is primarily an attempt to provide a conceptual analysis of ethical accountability, i.e. a type of accountability that takes into account the human relational responsibility, partial incoherence, and power of reflection. On the grounds of this characterisation, the article aims to provide a basis, among other things, for a discussion of the possibilities of identifying and empirically studying the multimodal expressions in communication that are relevant for this type of accountability. After an initial discussion of the debate on the limits of viewing accountability as transparency, we then turn to our methodological approach and introduce a conceptual analysis of accountability. Next, we discuss some additional features of accountability. Finally, we discuss the possibilities of empirically studying the institutionalisation of ethically informed accountability within person-centred health care.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article makes a distinction between global, organisational, and individual sustainability. It argues that sustainability relates to ethics, and that individuals and organisations are expected to follow different ethical standards. When, in a society of organisations, individuals adopt an organisational kind of ethics, global sustainability is at risk. The article discusses some effects of an organising — rather than an organisational — perspective. It is suggested that global sustainability depends on how individuals define their true interests.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In providing free access to educational resources from some of the most prestigious universities in the world, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have been hailed as both a revolution and threat for the 'traditionally elite' higher education system. Stepping away from the label of 'traditionally elite', this article argues that universities actually have relatively open origins and that the democratisation of higher education, as espoused by the big MOOC providers, is not entirely new. Instead, this retrospective analysis of the development of universities indicates a cyclical model of change, one in which waves of inclusivity alternate with bouts of exclusivity. In highlighting this issue, and parallel ideas about university as a 'place', this historical overview provides a useful backdrop to contemporary debates about MOOCs. It shows how MOOCs, as they currently appear, are neither revolutionising nor destroying higher education, they are simply part of its cyclical evolution
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Turkey has been experiencing a migration policy transformation in the wake of a new ruling entitled the ‘Foreigners and International Protection Law’ (FIPL). This qualitative inquiry investigates this major change process by focusing on the planned reorganisation which is a result of the legislation process, with the aim of connecting the change process to a change model. The researcher interviewed twenty-seven middle and upper-level managers and experts from the Foreigners, Border, and Asylum Department (FBAD) and Asylum and Migration Bureau (AMB) of the Turkish Ministry of the Interior. Both their implementation of the change process and perceptions on such a transformation period were investigated. The study also examined the change process of the irregular migration and asylum regime within Turkey’s bid for full European Union membership as well as implementation of the draft FIPL. This study provides an example of a policy change process by analysing how governmental practice and legislation have evolved with regard to irregular migration, asylum seekers, and refugees in Turkey. The results noticeably reveal that, instead of seeing irregular migration and asylum as merely a threat to national security or a welfare issue, Turkey has chosen a way of developing a humanitarian approach in both the legislative and administrative fields. This is the first study which attempts to analyse a particular policy change process in the migration and asylum regime in Turkey. The results could influence policy dynamics and set priorities by suggesting policy solutions.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Leadership requires creativity and demands responsiveness, flexibility, and risk taking. Contemporary business operations acknowledge the need for this leadership capacity at all levels of the organisation. This article reports on an action research project conducted over four years in Brisbane, Australia in which improvisation was applied to training agendas in which the developmental goals included enhancing emerging leaders’ capacities in uncertainty throughout change processes. It gives account of the way in which technical aspects of improvised theatre practice have been applied to develop capacities such as self-confidence, autonomy, trust, and resilience, and responsiveness in collaborative and competitive environments. The improvisation method drew on highly structured physical theatre languages to facilitate participants’ emerging awareness of leadership capacities and competencies through the interrogation of their own habitual positions in relation to listening, leading and following, collaboration, and problem identification.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article aims to examine and describe the power relations between the Israeli police force and Civil Guard (CG). The CG, established as an independent organisation adjacent to the police, was intended to fight terrorism. Within a few years of its 1974 establishment, the CG began encroaching upon police duties. This research has revealed that the CG adopted goal displacement as a strategy for survival, that is, for coping with police threats which were leading to its decline as an organisation. To face these threats, and in an attempt to fend them off, the CG adapted its goals to suit the police, but this strategy did not help it to survive. Instead, the similarities between its goal system and that of the police led to the CG becoming absorbed within the police, as an internal department, thereby losing its independence.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Organisational Transformation and Social Change