Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering (COMPUT METHOD BIOMEC)

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Journal description

The primary aims of the journal are to provide a means of communicating the advances being made in the areas of biomechanics and biomedical engineering, and to stimulate interest in the continually emerging computer based technologies which are being applied in these multidisciplinary subjects. The journal will also provide a focus for the importance of integrating the disciplines of engineering with medical technology and clinical expertise. Such integration will have a major impact on health care in the future. High quality research articles form the main body of the journal. These contributed papers will cover both the engineering and clinical aspects of computer methods in biomedical engineering. Topics covered include the mechanical response of bone and bone/tissue/ implant analysis, modelling of biomaterials, material identification, human body impact, computer assisted surgery, surgical simulation, computer animation, and medical imaging. Dental mechanics, biofluids, cardiovascular mechanics, soft-tissue modelling, and joint/ ligament mechanics are also topics of primary importance. As well as providing a forum where advances in these complex areas can be published and discussed in open academic debate, the journal also contains review and feature articles, technical notes and short communications and a news and reviews section.

Current impact factor: 1.77

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 1.77
2013 Impact Factor 1.793
2012 Impact Factor 1.393
2011 Impact Factor 0.849
2010 Impact Factor 1.565
2009 Impact Factor 1.454
2008 Impact Factor 0.572
2007 Impact Factor 0.779

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.69
Cited half-life 4.30
Immediacy index 0.69
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.50
Website Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering website
Other titles Computer methods in biomechanics and biomedical engineering (Online)
ISSN 1476-8259
OCLC 50515384
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a method of monocular human motion tracking for estimation of hurdle clearance kinematic parameters. The analysis involved 10 image sequences of five hurdlers at various training levels. Recording of the sequences was carried out under simulated starting conditions of a 110 m hurdle race. The parameters were estimated using the particle swarm optimization algorithm and they are based on analysis of the images recorded with a 100 Hz camera. The proposed method does not involve using any special clothes, markers, inertial sensors, etc. As the quality criteria, the mean absolute error and mean relative error were used. The level of computed errors justifies the use of this method to estimate hurdle clearance parameters.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: This study was to develop a strain analysis method to evaluate the left ventricular (LV) functions in type 2 diabetic patients with an asymptomatic LV diastolic dysfunction. Methods: Two groups (10 asymptomatic type 2 diabetic subjects and 10 control ones) were considered. All of the subjects had normal ejection fraction values but impaired diastolic functions assessed by the transmitral blood flow velocity. For each subject, based on cardiac MRI, global indexes including LV volume, LV myocardial mass, cardiac index (CI), and transmitral peak velocity, were measured, and regional indexes (i.e., LV deformation, strain and strain rate) were calculated through an image-registration technology. Results: Most of the global indexes did not differentiate between the two groups, except for the CI, LV myocardial mass and transmitral peak velocity. While for the regional indexes, the global LV diastolic dysfunction of the diabetic indicated an increased strain (0.08 ± 0.044 vs. -0.031 ± 0.077, p = 0.001) and a reduced strain rate (1.834 ± 0.909 vs. 3.791 ± 2.394, p = 0.033) compared to the controls, moreover, the local LV diastolic dysfunction reflected by the strain and strain rate varied, and the degree of dysfunction gradually decreased from the basal level to the apical level. Conclusions: The results showed that the strain and strain rates are effective to capture the subtle alterations of the LV functions, and the proposed method can be used to estimate the LV myocardial function based on cardiac MRI.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Understanding collagen and stress fiber remodeling is essential for the development of engineered tissues with good functionality. These processes are complex, highly interrelated, and occur over different time scales. As a result, excessive computational costs are required to computationally predict the final organization of these fibers in response to dynamic mechanical conditions. In this study, an analytical approximation of a stress fiber remodeling evolution law was derived. A comparison of the developed technique with the direct numerical integration of the evolution law showed relatively small differences in results, and the proposed method is one to two orders of magnitude faster.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Initial stability is essential for open reduction internal fixation of intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Geometrical feature of a calcaneal plate is influential to its endurance under physiological load. It is unclear if conventional and pre-contoured anatomical calcaneal plates may exhibit differently in biomechanical perspective. A Sanders' Type II-B intraarticular calcaneal fracture model was reconstructed to evaluate the effectiveness of calcaneal plates using finite element methods. Incremental vertical joint loads up to 450 N were exerted on the subtalar joint to evaluate the stability and safety of the calcaneal plates and bony structure. Results revealed that the anatomical calcaneal plate model had greater average structural stiffness (585.7 N/mm) and lower von Mises stress on the plate (774.5 MPa) compared to those observed in the conventional calcaneal plate model (stiffness: 430.9 N/mm; stress on plate: 867.1 MPa). Although both maximal compressive and maximal tensile stress and strain were lower in the anatomical calcaneal plate group, greater loads on fixation screws were found (average 172.7 MPa compared to 82.18 MPa in the conventional calcaneal plate). It was noted that high magnitude stress concentrations would occur where the bone plate bridges the fracture line on the lateral side of the calcaneus bone. Sufficient fixation strength at the posterolateral calcaneus bone is important for maintaining subtalar joint load after reduction and fixation of a Sanders' Type II-B calcaneal fracture. In addition, geometrical design of a calcaneal plate should worth considering for the mechanical safety in practical usage.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: The dielectric properties of human bone are one of the most essential inputs required by electromagnetic stimulation for improved bone regeneration. Measuring the electric properties of bone is a difficult task because of the complexity of the bone structure. Therefore, an automatic approach is presented to calibrate the electric properties of bone. The numerical method consists of three steps: generating input from experimental data, performing the numerical simulation, and calibrating the bone dielectric properties. As an example, the dielectric properties at 20 Hz of a rabbit distal femur were calibrated. The calibration process was considered as an optimization process with the aim of finding the optimum dielectric bone properties that match most of the numerically calculated simulation and experimentally measured data sets. The optimization was carried out automatically by the optimization software tool iSIGHT in combination with the finite-element solver COMSOL Multiphysics. As a result, the optimum conductivity and relative permittivity of the rabbit distal femur at 20 Hz were found to be 0.09615 S/m and 19522 for cortical bone and 0.14913 S/m and 1561507 for cancellous bone, respectively. The proposed method is a potential tool for the identification of realistic dielectric properties of the entire bone volume. The presented approach combining iSIGHT with COMSOL is applicable to, amongst others, designing implantable electro-stimulative devices or the optimization of electrical stimulation parameters for improved bone regeneration.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: During the larval stages of development, the imaginal disc of Drosphila Melanogaster is composed by a monolayer of epithelial cells, which undergo a strain actively produced by the cells themselves. The well-organized collective contraction produces a stress field that seemingly has a double morphogenetic role: it orchestrates the cellular organization towards the macroscopic shape emergence while simultaneously providing a local information on the organ size. Here we perform numerical simulations of such a mechanical control on morphogenesis at a continuum level, using a three-dimensional finite model that accounts for the active cell contraction. The numerical model is able to reproduce the (few) known qualitative characteristics of the tensional patterns within the imaginal disc of the fruit fly. The computed stress components slightly deviate from planarity, thus confirming the previous theoretical assumptions of a nonlinear elastic analytical model, and enforcing the hypothesis that the spatial variation of the mechanical stress may act as a size regulating signal that locally scales with the global dimension of the domain.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: A computational approach is proposed for efficient design study of a reducer stent to be percutaneously implanted in enlarged right ventricular outflow tracts (RVOT). The need for such a device is driven by the absence of bovine or artificial valves which could be implanted in these RVOT to replace the absent or incompetent native valve, as is often the case over time after Tetralogy of Fallot repair. Hemodynamics are simulated in the stented RVOT via a reduce order model based on proper orthogonal decomposition, while the artificial valve is modeled as a thin resistive surface. The reduced order model is obtained from the numerical solution on a reference device configuration, then varying the geometrical parameters (diameter) for design purposes. To validate the approach, forces exerted on the valve and on the reducer are monitored, varying with geometrical parameters, and compared with the results of full CFD simulations. Such an approach could also be useful for uncertainty quantification.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: A novel concept for rib fixation is presented that involves the use of a bioresorbable polymer intramedullary telescoping splint. Bone cement is used to anchor each end of the splint inside the medullary canal on each side of the fracture site. In this manner, rib fixation is achieved without fixation device protrusion from the rib, making the splint completely intramedullary. Finite element analysis is used to demonstrate that such a splint/cement composite can preserve rib fixation subjected to cough-intensity force loadings. Computational fluid dynamics and porcine rib experiments were used to study the anchor formation process required to complete the fixation.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the mechanical effects of tissue responses, such as remodelling, in the arteries of the elderly, it is important to evaluate stress in the intimal layer. In this study, we investigated a novel technique to evaluate the effect of layer-specific characteristics on stress in the arterial wall in an elderly subject. We used finite element analysis of a segment of carotid artery with intimal thickening, incorporating stress-released geometries and the stress-strain relationships for three separate wall layers. We correlated the stress-strain relationships and local curvatures of the layers with the stress on the arterial wall under physiological loading. The simulation results show that both the stress-strain relationship and the local curvature of the innermost stress-released layer influence the circumferential stress and its radial gradient. This indicates that intimal stress is influenced significantly by location-dependent intimal remodelling. However, further investigation is needed before conclusive inferences can be drawn.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work is to show a quick and simple procedure able to identify the geometrical parameters of the intervertebral disc that strongly affect the behavior of the FEM model. First, we allocated a selection criterion for the minimum number of geometrical parameters that describe, with a good degree of approximation, a healthy human vertebra. Next, we carried out a sensitivity analysis using the 'Taguchi orthogonal array' to arrive at a quick identification of the parameters that strongly affect the behavior of the Fem model.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we evaluated computational efficiency of finite element (FE) simulations when a numerical approximation method was used to obtain the tangent moduli. A fiber-reinforced hyperelastic material model for nearly incompressible soft tissues was implemented for 3D solid elements using both the approximation method and the closed-form analytical method, and validated by comparing the components of the tangent modulus tensor (also referred to as the material Jacobian) between the two methods. The computational efficiency of the approximation method was evaluated with different perturbation parameters and approximation schemes, and quantified by the number of iteration steps and CPU time required to complete these simulations. From the simulation results, it can be seen that the overall accuracy of the approximation method is improved by adopting the central difference approximation scheme compared to the forward Euler approximation scheme. For small-scale simulations with about 10,000 DOFs, the approximation schemes could reduce the CPU time substantially compared to the closed-form solution, due to the fact that fewer calculation steps are needed at each integration point. However, for a large-scale simulation with about 300,000 DOFs, the advantages of the approximation schemes diminish because the factorization of the stiffness matrix will dominate the solution time. Overall, as it is material model independent, the approximation method simplifies the FE implementation of a complex constitutive model with comparable accuracy and computational efficiency to the closed-form solution, which makes it attractive in FE simulations with complex material models.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: While locking plate fixation is becoming increasingly popular for complex and osteoporotic fractures, for many indications compression plating remains the standard choice. This study compares the mechanical behaviour of the more recent locking compression plate (LCP) device, with the traditional dynamic compression plates (DCPs) in bone of varying quality using finite element modelling. The bone properties considered include orthotropy, inhomogeneity, cortical thinning and periosteal apposition associated with osteoporosis. The effect of preloads induced by compression plating was included in the models. Two different fracture scenarios were modelled: one with complete reduction and one with a fracture gap. The results show that the preload arising in DCPs results in large principal strains in the bone all around the perimeter of the screw hole, whereas for LCPs large principal strains occur primarily on the side of the screw proximal to the load. The strains within the bone produced by the two screw types are similar in healthy bone with a reduced fracture gap; however, the DCP produces much larger strains in osteoporotic bone. In the presence of a fracture gap, the DCP results in a considerably larger region with high tensile strains and a slightly smaller region with high compressive strains. These findings provide a biomechanical basis for the reported improved performance of locking plates in poorer bone quality.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: It is now commonplace to represent materials in a simulation using assemblies of discrete particles. Sometimes, one wishes to maintain the integrity of boundaries between particle types, for example, when modelling multiple tissue layers. However, as the particle assembly evolves during a simulation, particles may pass across interfaces. This behaviour is referred to as 'seepage'. The aims of this study were (i) to examine the conditions for seepage through a confining particle membrane and (ii) to define some simple rules that can be employed to control seepage. Based on the force-deformation response of spheres with various sizes and stiffness, we develop analytic expressions for the force required to move a 'probe particle' between confining 'membrane particles'. We analyse the influence that particle's size and stiffness have on the maximum force that can act on the probe particle before the onset of seepage. The theoretical results are applied in the simulation of a biological cell under unconfined compression.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to evaluate the fracture union or non-union for a specific patient that presented oblique fractures in tibia and fibula, using a mechanistic-based bone healing model. Normally, this kind of fractures can be treated through an intramedullary nail using two possible configurations that depends on the mechanical stabilisation: static and dynamic. Both cases are simulated under different fracture geometries in order to understand the effect of the mechanical stabilisation on the fracture healing outcome. The results of both simulations are in good agreement with previous clinical experience. From the results, it is demonstrated that the dynamization of the fracture improves healing in comparison with a static or rigid fixation of the fracture. This work shows the versatility and potential of a mechanistic-based bone healing model to predict the final outcome (union, non-union, delayed union) of realistic 3D fractures where even more than one bone is involved.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Simplified material models are commonly used in computational simulation of biological soft tissue as an approximation of the complicated material response and to minimize computational resources. However, the simulation of complex loadings, such as long-duration tissue swelling, necessitates complex models that are not easy to formulate. This paper strives to offer the updated Lagrangian formulation comprehensive procedure of various non-linear material models for the application of finite element analysis of biological soft tissues including a definition of the Cauchy stress and the spatial tangential stiffness. The relationships between water content, osmotic pressure, ionic concentration and the pore pressure stress of the tissue are discussed with the merits of these models and their applications.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack, is caused by reduced blood supply and damages the heart muscle because of a lack of oxygen. Myocardial infarction initiates a cascade of biochemical and mechanical events. In the early stages, cardiomyocytes death, wall thinning, collagen degradation, and ventricular dilation are the immediate consequences of myocardial infarction. In the later stages, collagenous scar formation in the infarcted zone and hypertrophy of the non-infarcted zone are auto-regulatory mechanisms to partly correct for these events. Here we propose a computational model for the short-term adaptation after myocardial infarction using the continuum theory of multiplicative growth. Our model captures the effects of cell death initiating wall thinning, and collagen degradation initiating ventricular dilation. Our simulations agree well with clinical observations in early myocardial infarction. They represent a first step toward simulating the progression of myocardial infarction with the ultimate goal to predict the propensity toward heart failure as a function of infarct intensity, location, and size.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Thrombus in a femoral artery may form under stagnant flow conditions which vary depending on the local arterial waveform. Four different physiological flow waveforms - poor (blunt) monophasic, sharp monophasic, biphasic and triphasic - can exist in the femoral artery as a result of different levels of peripheral arterial disease progression. This study aims to examine the effect of different physiological waveforms on femoral artery haemodynamics. In this regard, a fluid-structure interaction analysis was carried out in idealised models of bifurcated common femoral artery. The results showed that recirculation zones occur in almost all flow waveforms; however, the sites at where these vortices are initiated, the size and structure of vortices are highly dependent on the type of flow waveform being used. It was shown that the reverse diastolic flow in biphasic and triphasic waveforms leads to the occurrence of a retrograde flow which aids in 'washout' of the disturbed flow regions. This may limit the likelihood of thrombus formation, indicating the antithrombotic role of retrograde flow in femoral arteries. Furthermore, our data revealed that the flow particles experience considerably higher residence time under blunt and sharp monophasic waveforms than under biphasic and triphasic waveforms. This confirms that the risk of atherothrombotic plaque initiation and development in femoral arteries is higher under blunt and sharp monophasic waveforms than under biphasic and triphasic flow waveforms.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering