Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials

Publisher: BioMed Central

Journal description

Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials is an Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal focusing on information concerning clinical microbiology, infectious diseases and antimicrobials. The management of infectious disease is dependent on correct diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial treatment, and with this in mind, the journal aims to improve the communication between basic and clinical science in the field of clinical microbiology and antimicrobial treatment. Manuscripts submitted to Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials can report on: any aspect of diagnosis of infectious diseases; case management and antimicrobial treatment; and antibiotic development and antimicrobial resistance. Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials has a broad scope, incorporating microbiology and antimicrobials in almost all branches of medicine. Furthermore, the journal has no restrictions on space or access; this ensures that the journal can reach the widest possible audience.

Current impact factor: 2.19

Impact Factor Rankings

2016 Impact Factor Available summer 2017
2014 / 2015 Impact Factor 2.189
2013 Impact Factor 1.514
2012 Impact Factor 1.623
2011 Impact Factor 2.64

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 5.40
Immediacy index 0.13
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials website
Other titles ACMA
ISSN 1476-0711
OCLC 51164619
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

BioMed Central

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used
    • Eligible UK authors may deposit in OpenDepot
    • Creative Commons Attribution License
    • Copy of License must accompany any deposit.
    • All titles are open access journals
    • 'BioMed Central' is an imprint of 'Springer Verlag (Germany)'
  • Classification
    green

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Background Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the most prevalent Salmonella serotypes that cause gastroenteritis worldwide and the most prevalent serotype causing Salmonella infections in China. A rapid molecular typing method with high throughput and good epidemiological discrimination is urgently needed for detecting the outbreaks and finding the source for effective control of S. Enteritidis infections. Methods In this study, 194 strains which included 47 from six outbreaks that were well-characterized epidemiologically were analyzed with pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Seven VNTR loci published by the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were used to evaluate and develop MLVA scheme for S. Enteritidis molecular subtyping by comparing with PFGE, and then MLVA was applied to the suspected outbreaks detection. All S. Enteritidis isolates were analyzed with MLVA to establish a MLVA database in Shenzhen, Guangdong province, China to facilitate the detection of S. Enteritidis infection clusters. Results There were 33 MLVA types and 29 PFGE patterns among 147 sporadic isolates. These two measures had Simpson indices of 0.7701 and 0.8043, respectively, which did not differ significantly. Epidemiological concordance was evaluated by typing 47 isolates from six epidemiologically well-characterized outbreaks and it did not differ for PFGE and MLVA. We applied the well established MLVA method to detect two S. Enteritidis foodborne outbreaks and find their sources successfully in 2014. A MLVA database of 491 S. Enteritidis strains isolated from 2004 to 2014 was established for the surveillance of clusters in the future. Conclusions MLVA typing of S. Enteritidis would be an effective tool for early warning and epidemiological surveillance of S. Enteritidis infections.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2016 · Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
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    ABSTRACT: Background Antibiotic resistance in bacteria leads to massive health problems. Incidence of carbapenem and multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria are increasing globally and turn out to be a very urgent challenge in health care. Resistant bacteria play an important clinical role during hospital outbreaks as well as in sepsis. Rapid diagnostic tests are necessary to provide immediate information for antimicrobial treatment and infection control measures. Methods Our mass spectrometry-based assay was validated with 63 carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacterial isolates, and 35 carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative species with no carbapenemase production. These were analyzed from solid culture media and positive blood culture vials. After 4 h of incubation the carbapenemase products were analyzed with the MALDI-TOF MS. All the isolates were genotyped for carbapenemase genes by PCR and sequencing. Results For culture isolates the concordance of hydrolysis assay to genetic results was 98 % for OXA variants, KPC, VIM, IMP, GIM, and NDM. In contrast, only 14 of 29 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates carrying the OXA and NDM genes could be identified from blood culture. However, from blood culture vials our method allowed the detection of carbapenemases in 98 % of Pseudomonas and Enterobacteriaceae isolates harboring different genes. Conclusions This MALDI-TOF MS–based assay permitted the detection of carbapenemases either from solid culture media (98–100 %) or blood culture vials (96 %) for all non-A. baumannii isolates within 4 h. In case of A. baumannii isolates the assay was highly sensitive for the detection of carbapenemases directly from solid culture media.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2016 · Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
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    ABSTRACT: Background Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (CPKP) strains have emerged as a major problem for healthcare systems. The aim of this study was to determine the circulating clones and analyze the clinical and molecular characteristics of CPKP in our hospital. Methods A total of 74 carbapenemase producers collected from our hospital from 2012 to 2014 were analyzed for the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs), plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQRs), exogenously acquired 16S rRNA methyltransferase (16S-RMTase), and plasmid-mediated AmpC enzyme (pAmpCs) by PCR and DNA sequencing. The sequence types (STs) of the carbapenemase producers were analyzed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). And Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to investigate the genetic relationship of KPC-2 producing strains. Clinical data were retrieved from the medical records. Results KPC-2 (n = 72) was the predominant enzyme followed by NDM-1 (n = 2); The genes blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM-1, blaDHA-1, rmtB, armA, oqxA, oqxB, and qnrB were present in 29 (39.2 %), 27 (36.5 %), 46 (62.2 %), 2 (2.7 %), 25 (33.8 %), 1 (1.4 %), 60 (81.1 %) and 56 (75.7 %), 6 (8.1 %) isolates, respectively. MLST analysis revealed 10 different STs. The most dominant ST was ST11 (78.4 %, 58/74), followed by ST15 (8.1 %, 6/74). PFGE patterns of the KPC-2 producing K. pneumoniae isolates exhibited clonal dissemination of ST11 and ST15 clones as well as a genetic diversity of the remaining strains. Conclusion The intra- and inter-hospital cross-transmission of KPC-2-producing K. pneumoniae ST11 co-carrying oqxAB and rmtB in our hospital strongly suggested that rapid identification of colonized or infected patients and screening of carriers is quite necessary to prevent a scenario of endemicity.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2016 · Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
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    ABSTRACT: Background Recently, new carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae strains and non-fermentative gram-negative bacilli have been reported. The New Delhi metallo‐β‐lactamase-1 (NDM-1) is a major problem around the world. The purpose of this article is to address the NDM-1 Klebsiella pneumoniae epidemic detected in eight cases in our hospital. Methods Bacteria identified in this epidemic were from patients already admitted to the intensive care unit of the Sakarya University Training and Research Hospital during efforts toward establishment of infection surveillance and control program. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of strains was performed using the VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux, France), E-test gradient strips (bioMérieux, France), and the disc diffusion test. For the metallo-beta-lactamase activity, the combined disc diffusion test and modified Hodge test as phenotypic tests were performed. To identify the resistance gene, the Xpert Carba-R kit (Cepheid Inc., USA) and an in-house multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method designed for five common carbapenemase genes (IMP, VIM, KPC, NDM-1, and OXA-48) were employed. The clonal relationship of these strains was explored by the repetitive PCR (rep-PCR, DiversiLab System, bioMérieux, France) method. Results During the December 2014 to March 2015 period, NDM-1 positive K. pneumoniae strains were detected in eight patients. All of these strains were found to produce NDM-1, while two of them also revealed the presence of OXA‐48. The rep-PCR results reveal a clonal proximity of 95 % for six of the eight strains. Conclusions Our findings suggest the tendency of NDM-1-producing strains to spread in our country as well. A carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae threat may pose a great risk to our country. It is clear that more comprehensive infection control precautions should be implemented in our hospitals.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2016 · Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
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    ABSTRACT: Background Community acquired infections due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) had been increased. The fecal flora of children in the community represents a huge potential reservoir for ESBLs which are located on highly transmissible plasmids. This study examined the prevalence of ESBL-PE fecal carriage, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, possible risk factors, and characterized the genes encoding these ESBL enzymes in Lebanese children community. Methods A total of 125 rectal swabs were taken from healthy children aged from 1 to 5 years. Detection of ESBLs was carried out using combination-disc method test and multiplex PCR. A questionnaire concerning child’s lifestyle and risk factors for ESBL carriage was illustrated. Results Thirty-one of 125 participants (24.8 %) carried ESBL-PE. Regular consumption of meat, and chicken were significantly associated with high carriage rate of ESBL-PE, while dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese) association was non-significant. Intimate hygiene habits were found also affecting the carriage rate. Multiple bla genes were the most common, 48.4 % (15/31) of ESBL-PE carried both bla CTX-M and bla TEM, and 22.6 % (7/31) carried bla CTX-M, bla SHV, and bla TEM, 29 % (9) carried bla CTX-M only. Concerning CTX-M-types, CTX-M-9 was the most predominant (24/31) and mostly in combination with CTX-M-15 type. Conclusion High rate of colonization in healthy children with ESBL-PE was observed, regular consumption of dietary products from animal source (meat or chicken) were associated with this colonization in the community in non-hospitalized children. To our best knowledge it is the first study about regular consumption of dairy product as a risk factor for ESBL-PE community carriage, the first data about the carriage rate of ESBL-PE in community children in Lebanon and Middle East, and for the wide dissemination of CTX-M-9 type in this population.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2016 · Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
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    ABSTRACT: Background Staphylococcus aureus is one of the causes of both community and healthcare-associated bacteremia. The attributable mortality of S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) is still higher and predictors for mortality and clinical outcomes of this condition are need to be clarified. In this prospective observational study, we aimed to examine the predictive factors for mortality in patients with SAB in eight Turkish tertiary care hospitals. Methods Adult patients with signs and symptoms of bacteremia with positive blood cultures for S. aureus were included. All data for episodes of SAB including demographics, clinical and laboratory findings, antibiotics, and outcome were recorded for a 3-year (2010–2012) period. Cox proportional hazard model with forward selection was used to assess the independent effect of risk factors on mortality. A 28-day mortality was the dependent variable in the Cox regression analysis. Results A total of 255 episodes of SAB were enrolled. The median age of the patients was 59 years. Fifty-five percent of the episodes were considered as primary SAB and vascular catheter was the source of 42.1 %. Healthcare associated SAB was defined in 55.7 %. Blood cultures yielded methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) as a cause of SAB in 39.2 %. Initial empirical therapy was inappropriate in 28.2 %. Although overall mortality was observed in 52 (20.4 %), 28-day mortality rate was 15.3 %. Both the numbers of initial inappropriate empirical antibiotic treatment and the median hours to start an appropriate antibiotic between the cases of fatal outcome and survivors after fever onset were found to be similar (12/39 vs 60/216 and 6 vs 12 h, respectively; p > 0.05). High Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score (p = 0.002), MRSA (p = 0.017), intensive care unit (ICU) admission (p < 0.001) and prior exposure to antibiotics (p = 0.002) all were significantly associated with mortality. The Cox analysis defined age [Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.03; p = 0.023], ICU admission (HR 6.9; p = 0.002), and high CCI score (HR 1.32; p = 0.002) as the independent predictive factors mortality. Conclusions The results of this prospective study showed that age, ICU stay and high CCI score of a patient were the independent predictors of mortality and MRSA was also significantly associated with mortality in SAB.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
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    ABSTRACT: Brucellosis is a zoonosis that disseminated by a variety of ways between animals and humans. The effective disinfection of contaminated environments, soil, feces, and animal bodies plays an irreplaceable role in the prevention and control of brucellosis. To kill Brucella effectively, the bactericidal effects of frequently used disinfectants (including aldehydes, halogens, quaternary ammonium compound, phenolics, and alkalines) and the potential factors that influence disinfection effects were determined in the present study. The results revealed that the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the six disinfectants were all significantly lower than the routinely used concentrations, and all the tested disinfectants were effective against B. melitensis NI. The results of quantitative determination showed that the bactericidal effects of the disinfectants were influenced by their concentration, exposure time, dirty condition and the temperature. Under dirty conditions and a low temperatures, sodium hypochlorite and sodium hydroxide showed better bactericidal effect, while benzalkonium chloride was almost without bactericidal ability. In addition, increasing the disinfectant concentration at low temperatures can improve the bactericidal effect. The present study suggested that Brucella is sensitive to commonly used disinfectants. However, the bactericidal effect is vulnerable to dirty conditions and low temperatures. Thus, it is necessary to test the in vitro sensitivity of disinfectants that are commonly used on farms or the new disinfectant formulations periodically, with the aim of improving the efficacy of animal and human brucellosis prevention programs.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Carbapenem resistance among the Enterobacteriaceae is a serious healthcare challenge. bla IMI is a carbapenemase gene mediating resistance to carbapenems but has not been commonly found. A bla IMI-carrying Enterobacter cloacae, which was also resistant to colistin, is reported here. Findings: E. cloacae strain WCHECl-1060 was recovered from a blood sample of a leukemia patient, who was not previously exposed to colistin. Strain WCHECl-1060 belongs to a new sequence type, ST410, and was resistant to carbapenems and colistin but was susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins. A new allelic variant of bla IMI-1, which has two silent mutations compared to the original bla IMI-1 variant, was found in strain WCHECl-1060. Conjugation and transformation experiments failed to transfer bla IMI-1, suggesting a likely chromosome origin. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IMI-1 carbapenemase-producing colistin-resistant E. cloacae in China. Microbiological laboratories should be aware of the unusual carbapenem-resistant but third-generation cephalosporin-susceptible profiles of these IMI-producing isolates. The trend of colistin resistance among the Enterobacteriaceae should be also monitored.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is challenging. It is unclear whether galactomannan (GM) results from bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples differ in a clinically meaningful way. Results: Ninety-six paired (BAL and BW) samples from 85 patients were included. The average age was 53 years, 61 % of the patients were male, and 74.1 % had an underlying diagnosis of AML/MDS (ALL 7.1 %, other hematologic malignancy 18.8 %). 57 (67.1 %) patients were neutropenic, and 56 (65.9 %) patients were receiving mold-active drugs at least 48 h prior to bronchoscopy. The overall agreement between GM detection from BW and BAL was 63.5 % (K = 0.152; 95 % CI 0.008-0.311) and 73 % (K = 0.149; 95 % CI 0.048-0.348) at cut off ≥0.5 and ≥1.0, respectively. Among 43 positive samples, using a GM cut-off of 0.5, 39 (90.5 %) were positive in BW samples whereas 12 (29.3 %) were positive in BAL samples. The median level of GM in BW (0.28) samples was significantly higher than in BAL (0.20) samples among 53 samples with negative results (P = 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the median GM values between the BW and BAL samples with positive results (P = 0.08). There was no significant difference in GM detection between samples with positive and negative results with regard to antifungal, beta lactam antibacterial treatment or neutropenia (60.5 vs 56.6 %; 53.9 vs 46 %; 65.1 vs 54.7 %, respectively). Conclusion: This retrospective study examining two collection techniques suggests that BW may have higher diagnostic yield compared to bronchoalveolar lavage for GM detection.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
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    ABSTRACT: Early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment can significantly reduce mortality of nosocomial bacterial meningitis. However, it is a challenge for clinicians to make an accurate and rapid diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. This study aimed at determining whether combined biomarkers can provide a useful tool for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. A retrospective study was carried out. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The patients with bacterial meningitis had significantly elevated levels of the above mentioned biomarkers. The two biomarkers were all risk factors with bacterial meningitis. The biomarkers were constructed into a "bioscore". The discriminative performance of the bioscore was better than that of each biomarker, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.842 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.770-0.914; p< 0.001). Combined measurement of CSF DcR3 and sTREM-1 concentrations improved the prediction of nosocomial bacterial meningitis. The combined strategy is of interest and the validation of that improvement needs further studies.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials